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Windows Vista "Brute Force Keygen" a hoax

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It sounded too good to be true, and it turns out it was. KezNews forum frequenter "Computer User" confessed last night that his Brute Force Keygen hack for Windows Vista is a scam. "Fact is the brute force keygen is a joke, i [sic] never intended for it to work. I have never gotten it to work, everyone should stop using it! Everyone who said they got a key a probably lying or mistaken!" Oddly enough, Adrian Kingsley-Hughes of ZD Net, who we sourced the news from yesterday, claims to have found two activation keys with this method, so it's hard to tell who to believe: a confessing prankster, or a potentially duped but trusted source. For the moment, we're going to go with Computer User's word on this one, because the likelihood that Microsoft would issue enough keys to make a random key generator at all viable for obtaining 25-character product keys is pretty dang slim.

[Via Slashdot; thanks Matt]

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