Latest in 802.11

Image credit:

CarTel uses wardriving for science, better driving directions

Samuel Axon
October 10, 2008
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

If you're not satisfied with the driving directions you get on Google Maps, a few smart guys at MIT have created an elaborate new toy called CarTel just for you. They've equipped a fleet of Boston-area cars with computers that automatically connect to any 802.11 access points detected in transit, then send home data recorded by their on board diagnostic systems, all in just a few hundred milliseconds. The result: a website that gives you directions based on information gathered in real-time so you can avoid high-traffic areas or say, if it's raining, roads which have historically been congested in adverse weather conditions -- no GPS required. The project also keeps a record of all access points detected, so think of it as wardriving for the good of humanity -- and you (probably) wouldn't even get arrested for participating!

[Via PhysOrg]



All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Candy Crush creators bring Crash Bandicoot to iOS and Android

Candy Crush creators bring Crash Bandicoot to iOS and Android

View
Canon takes on Sony's A7 series with the full-frame EOS R6 camera

Canon takes on Sony's A7 series with the full-frame EOS R6 camera

View
Probe of failed Boeing Starliner launch finds a long list of problems

Probe of failed Boeing Starliner launch finds a long list of problems

View
Netflix is making a sixth season of 'The Crown' after all

Netflix is making a sixth season of 'The Crown' after all

View
Dell's XPS Desktop fits NVIDIA and AMD graphics inside a smaller case

Dell's XPS Desktop fits NVIDIA and AMD graphics inside a smaller case

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr