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US Army developing body armor to protect against 'X-threats'

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This one's unsurprisingly been in the works for a little while now, but it looks like the US Army is getting a bit closer to actually deploying a new type of body armor that it hopes will protect soldiers against both known threats and so-called "X-threats." While no one's saying exactly what those threats might be, the key to guarding against them, it seems, is an "advanced generation" of X-Sapi armor plating, which is apparently built from the same materials as current E-Sapi plates but built differently for "additional capabilities." That armor has been the subject of some criticism, however, since it actually adds some additional weight to the soldier's already heavy load, but Lt. Col. Jon Rickey of the Army's Soldier Protective Equipment program says there's still plenty of room for improvement in that respect. It's also, of course, still looking at plenty of other alternatives, including BAE's Ultra Lightweight Warrior program, which promises to cut the weight of helmets, vests and other equipment by twenty to thirty percent.

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