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Light Hum: a pure analog theremin that converts rays into electro-grooves (video)

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Who doesn't love a good theremin spectacle? We Engadgeteers are aficionados of the touchless, variable capacitor musical instrument used in countless '50s space films, so a project by student and designer Danne Woo definitely caught our eye. Woo, who appeared on one of our most popular Engadget shows ever, has built a light-sensing version of that instrument controlled by an AC sequencer. No computers are used in the all-analog device, which is played by moving sliders and dials that vary the intensity of eight lamps installed in front of the musician. The light is converted to varying-frequency sound via photocells, resistors and capacitors which feed a "kleebtronics sequencer" designed by Mark Kleback and Ezer Lichtenstein. To show what it could do, Danne performed a short concert at Glasslands in Brooklyn, bringing the "Good Vibrations" instrument to a whole 'nother place -- catch it in the video after the break.

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