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Daily Roundup: Samsung's EMC lab, interview with Qualcomm's Raj Talluri, new Chromecast apps and more!

Andy Bowen, @An_dbowen
December 10, 2013
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You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

Chromecast adds 10 new apps

Google's bringing 10 new apps to its $35 Chromecast dongle that are set to roll out within a few days. Click the link for more details.

Samsung's EMC lab (video)

Engadget's Mat Smith took a stroll through Samsung's EMC lab where future products are tested for interference levels. Click on through for the video tour.

Microsoft updates Photosynth

The latest beta release for Microsoft's popular panorama capture, Photosynth, brings several significant features. Along with ultra high-res imagery support, the update allows users to snap 3D models. Follow the link for more details.

Qualcomm's Raj Talluri on wearables

Today, Engadget sat down with Qualcomm SVP of Product Management, Raj Talluri, to chat about the company's Toq smartwatch. Click through to read the rest of the story.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
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