Latest in Science

Image credit:

'Cards Against Humanity' re-opens STEM scholarship for women

Building gender equality through horrible party jokes.
Andrew Dalton, @dolftown
September 19, 2016
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Last year, the wildly popular potty-mouthed card game Cards Against Humanity channeled the profits from its $10 Science Pack into a full-ride college scholarship for women studying science, technology, engineering or math. With Science Pack sales still going strong, and gender equality in STEM fields still sorely lacking, Cards is ready to accept another round of applications for the scholarship's second year.

Like last year, the scholarship offers full, four-year tuition to any woman seeking an undergraduate degree in any STEM field and applications will be reviewed by a board of over 60 women working in places like NASA JPL, Harvard Medical School and the National Science Foundation. Ideal candidates will be "an ambassador for their field" and are asked to submit a three-minute video lecture on a science topic they are passionate about. Applicants must be enrolled or planning to attend college in United States during the 2017 academic year, but any STEM field is fair game. (Sorry, no graduate students, however.) The deadline for submissions is December 11th at midnight and ten finalists will be asked to submit additional materials.

"I'm so excited that we're able to offer another scholarship for a woman studying STEM. A lot of us at Cards Against Humanity have backgrounds in science and tech, and the underrepresentation of women in these fields is staggering," Cards Against Humanity's community director Jenn Bane said in a statement.

To date, the scholarship has raised over $975,000 on the profits of that aforementioned Science Pack. More details about the application process can be found at the Science Ambassador Scholarship website, and for prospective applicants who need a little inspiration, here's last year's winning submission from Sona Dadhania, who studies Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania:

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

RISC-V is trying to launch an open-hardware revolution

RISC-V is trying to launch an open-hardware revolution

View
Chevy will start selling EV retrofit kits in 2021

Chevy will start selling EV retrofit kits in 2021

View
Some of Ubisoft's PS4 games won't run on PS5

Some of Ubisoft's PS4 games won't run on PS5

View
Ford reveals how much its Active Driver Assist option will cost

Ford reveals how much its Active Driver Assist option will cost

View
Scientists found an Earth-sized ‘rogue’ planet in the Milky Way

Scientists found an Earth-sized ‘rogue’ planet in the Milky Way

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr