Latest in Science

Image credit:

iRobot is selling off its military division

If only the bomb-disarming robots could vacuum.
2 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

The US military might seem like an endless cash train for contractors, but it's not always so. Vacuum bot maker iRobot has sold off its defense and security division in order to focus on its core Roomba business. If you were unaware that iRobot even made military toys, the company actually got its start building military hardware for the likes of DARPA as far back as 1998. At one point, it was awarded a $286 million military contract to produce robots that can detect and disarm bombs and do other risky chores.

The reason? There just wasn't enough money in it. According to its financial statements, iRobot raked in around 15 times more money with Roomba vacs than military robots. That doesn't mean its robots will have nothing to do. Much as Google is doing with Boston Dynamics, the new company will no doubt continue to produce existing models like the tossable 110 FirstLook, radiation-shrugging 510 PackBot and the 710 Kobra (below), which can reach up to eleven feet and carry 150 pounds. Hopefully they'll start building new ones, too, because we like writing about robots least as much as you like reading about them.

Via: Gizmodo
Source: iRobot
All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
2 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

The best consoles, games and accessories for students

The best consoles, games and accessories for students

View
CDC identifies a death potentially linked to vaping

CDC identifies a death potentially linked to vaping

View
AT&T and FTC settle lawsuit over data throttling

AT&T and FTC settle lawsuit over data throttling

View
Tesla's solar panels reportedly caught fire at an Amazon warehouse

Tesla's solar panels reportedly caught fire at an Amazon warehouse

View
Qualcomm won't have to offer patent licenses to rivals, for now

Qualcomm won't have to offer patent licenses to rivals, for now

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr