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ICYMI: Cadillac takes on Tesla's Autopilot and a biometric thrill ride

The ride of your life will be based on your heartbeat.
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Today on In Case You Missed It: When people think semi-autonomous driving, Tesla's Autopilot system is usually the first thing that comes to mind. But Cadillac wants in on the robot-driving action. The automaker is launching it's own system called Super Cruise on the upcoming 2018 CT6. The company says it's the "industry's first true hands-free driving technology for the highway." The new semi-self-driving technology will not only keep track of the road, but also the driver to make sure that they pay attention even if they don't have to have their hands on the wheel at all times.

Meanwhile Dutch artist Daniel de Bruin built a thrill ride that alters its behavior based on the rider's biometrics. The Neurotransmitter 3000 is a 23-foot tall ride that speeds up or slows down depending on a person's heart rate, body temperature and muscle tension. If the ride determines you're too calm, it'll speed up until it's satisfied with the signals your body is sending out.

As always, please share any interesting tech or science videos you find by using the #ICYMI hashtag on Twitter for @strngwys.

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