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Image credit: Stephen Lam / Reuters

Facebook's latest acquisition is all about fighting video piracy

Source3's tech will help the social network track illegally-shared media.
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Stephen Lam / Reuters

Facebook might be rolling out even more tools for video creators, but it still has a pressing problem: Folks passing off other people's video content as their own. To fight that piracy, the social giant has acquired Source3, a startup that will turn its IP-tracking powers to catch folks illegally sharing content across Facebook.

The social network started clamping down on illegitimate video back in August 2015 when it introduced the Rights Manager. This tool automatically matched media for content shared without permission and identified the rights owners, who could request it to be taken down. Then Facebook took a different tack in April: Give content producers the option to keep offending posts up, but claim their ad revenue. Source3's tech will help the social giant better pick out and track that erroneous content.

"We're excited to work with the Source3 team and learn from the expertise they've built in brand intellectual property, trademarks and copyright. As always, we are focused on ensuring we serve our partners well," a Facebook spokesperson told Engadget.

Via: Recode
Source: Source3
In this article: facebook, internet, piracy, Source3, video
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