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Image credit: Mobvoi

The latest TicWatch Pro includes 4G LTE to free you from your phone

It’s one of the most affordable Wear OS smartwatches.
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Mobvoi's second generation TicWatch Pro is available today, and the company hopes it will free you from your phone. The Wear OS-powered TicWatch Pro 4G/LTE offers wireless connectivity, so you can receive voice calls and app notifications, send and receive texts and use popular messaging apps. You can also hit an SOS button that will dial 911, and it will automatically sync your data with the cloud -- all without tethering you to another device.

The smartwatch comes with TicMotion 2.0, which promises to improve its fitness tracking capabilities. Like the TicWatch S2 and E2, the new TicWatch Pro uses AI to detect if you're running or "fast-walking," and it will soon be able to tell when you're swimming. You won't need to manually tap a mode to begin tracking, and you won't need your phone to sync data to the cloud. It will also measure workouts on a more granular level, monitoring things like time spent, distance and pace, and the new TicPulse feature will monitor your heart rate 24/7.

The updated watch includes features that made the original TicWatch Pro popular, like a dual-screen that lets users toggle between Smart Mode and Essential Mode to extend battery life up to 30 days. Like its predecessor, the new TicWatch Pro includes Google Assistant and Google Pay for NFC payments.

You can buy the TicWatch Pro 4G/LTE on Amazon and Mobvoi's website starting today, but you'll have to wait until next month for carrier support from Verizon. To compensate for the delayed 4G LTE service, Mobvoi is offering a 6.5 percent discount, meaning you can snag the watch for $279 until August 10th. After that, it will retail for $299. While that's slightly more than the first TicWatch Pro, which sold for $250, it's still one of the most affordable Wear OS-powered smartwatches on the market.

Verizon owns Engadget's parent company, Verizon Media. Rest assured, Verizon has no control over our coverage. Engadget remains editorially independent.

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