AMD unveils a liquid-cooled version of the Radeon RX 6900 XT GPU

It appears to have a memory bandwidth increase from the standard version of the graphics card.

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AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT Liquid Edition
AMD/Maingear

AMD is bringing liquid cooling to the Radeon RX 6900 XT with a new version of the GPU. The graphics card can run at higher clock speeds than its sibling, up to 2,250Mhz instead of 2,015Mhz. It also has a higher board power of 330 watts, compared with the standard RX 6900 XT's 300W board power, according to VideoCardz.

Perhaps most interestingly, the Radeon RX 6900 XT Liquid Edition seems to have increased memory bandwidth from the standard model, as The Verge notes. It appears to be up from 16Gbps to 18Gbps. Engadget has contacted AMD for confirmation. Otherwise, the liquid-cooled GPU has the same amount of memory size and infinity cache, and an identical number of compute units to the RX 6900 XT.

It has a two-slot height, so it's smaller than the air-cooled model, which required 2.5 slots. The Radeon RX 6900 XT Liquid Edition boasts an HDMI 2.1 slot, two DisplayPort ports and a a single USB-C one.

“The AMD-designed liquid-cooled Radeon RX 6900 XT graphics card is a limited-edition product for select system integrators," an AMD spokesperson told Engadget. "AMD will be making a limited number of Radeon RX 6900 XT liquid cooled reference design graphics cards available to select system integrators, who are a critical part of the gaming ecosystem, to offer this this model through their channels. Please contact system integrator partners for system pricing.”

The $1,000 RX 6900XT is at the higher end of the Radeon 6000 series lineup. It was one of AMD's first RDNA 2 PC cards. The company made another addition to the 6000 series line in March, with the $479 Radeon RX 6700 XT.

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