Sonos

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  • Sonos Sub Mini

    The Sub Mini is a much smaller and cheaper way to add bass to your Sonos system

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    09.13.2022

    Sonos has long offered a wireless subwoofer as part of its home theater, a large and powerful product that also costs a whopping $749. For anyone with a smaller room, or a smaller budget, it was a bit of a stretch. Sonos is giving bass-lovers a new option today: the rumored Sub Mini is real — and at $429, it costs a lot less than its bigger sibling.

  • Sonos Five

    Sonos is reportedly developing a speaker that can beam sound in almost all directions

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    08.25.2022

    The company is developing a trio of speakers called Optimo 2, 1 and 1 SL, according to 'The Verge.'

  • A woman passes the logo from the web search engine provider Google during the digital society festival 're:publica', at the Arena Berlin in Berlin, Germany June 9, 2022. REUTERS/Annegret Hilse

    Google and Sonos are now fighting over voice assistant patents

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    08.09.2022

    Google has sued Sonos, alleging that its new voice assistant violates seven patents related to its own Google Assistant technology.

  • A Solo Stove fire pit sitting on grass next to fire wood and an American flag at a backyard party.

    The best 4th of July tech sales we could find

    by 
    Valentina Palladino
    Valentina Palladino
    07.01.2022

    This week's best tech deals include discounts on Google Nest WiFi routers, Solo Stove fire pits and Blink security cameras.

  • Sonos has finally given us an upgrade to the Playbar, and it’s impressive. The Arc has an improved design, modern features and stellar sound. Plus, Arc automatically adjusts if you choose to expand your system.

    Sonos' latest refurbished sale knocks $360 off the Arc soundbar

    by 
    Valentina Palladino
    Valentina Palladino
    07.01.2022

    A bunch of refurbished Sonos speakers and soundbars are on sale, including the Sonos One SL for $119.

  • Apple TV 4K (2021) Siri Remote

    The Apple TV 4K drops to $130, plus the rest of the week's best tech deals

    by 
    Valentina Palladino
    Valentina Palladino
    06.17.2022

    This week's best tech deals include the Apple TV 4K for $130, the third-gen AirPods for $150, Amazon's Fire HD 8 for $50 and Amazon's Kindle for $60.

  • Sonos Roam portable speaker

    Sonos' Roam speaker is still 20 percent off, plus the rest of the week's best tech deals

    by 
    Valentina Palladino
    Valentina Palladino
    06.10.2022

    This week's best tech deals include 20 percent off Sonos speakers, the Apple Watch Series 7 for $329 and up to 43 percent off Solo Stove fire pits.

  • Sonos Roam portable speaker

    Sonos knocks 20 percent off Move and Roam speakers

    by 
    Igor Bonifacic
    Igor Bonifacic
    06.04.2022

    With summer around the corner, Sonos has discounted both of its Bluetooth speakers

  • AirPods Pro

    AirPods Pro drop to $180, plus the rest of the week's best tech deals

    by 
    Valentina Palladino
    Valentina Palladino
    06.03.2022

    This week's best tech deals include Apple's AirPods Pro for $180, Samsung's Galaxy Buds 2 for $95 and iRobot's Roomba 694 for $180.

  • Sonos Arc

    Sonos’ refurbished sale includes $180 off the Arc soundbar

    by 
    Valentina Palladino
    Valentina Palladino
    06.02.2022

    Refurbished Sonos devices are on sale right now, so you can pick up a speaker for as low as $139.

  • Sonos Voice Control

    Sonos' voice assistant is now available on select speakers

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    06.01.2022

    As promised, Sonos has launched its own voice assistant. Sonos Voice Control is now available on every speaker the company has released with a built-in mic. As with most new features, you set it up via the Sonos app on your iOS or Android device, and it's a super simple process.

  • Sonos Ray review photos
    82100
    82100

    Sonos Ray review: A soundbar that nails the basics

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    05.31.2022

    With the $279 Ray soundbar, Sonos is going after a new market. The company’s previous home theater products have all been $400 or more and have primarily been geared toward people intent on getting the best sound possible. The Ray, meanwhile, is more accessible for people who want better sound than their TV speakers can provide, but don’t necessarily care about things like Dolby Atmos support or room-shaking bass. The Ray isn’t exactly a budget speaker, though, so I set out to discover if Sonos made the right compromises here in its effort to make a more mainstream soundbar. Physically, the Ray is smaller than the already-compact Beam, with a tapered design that’s wider in the front than it is in the back. Unlike other Sonos soundbars, though, the Ray’s speakers are all forward-facing; in this way, it reminds me a bit of a wider and flatter version of the Sonos Five speaker. This design means you can tuck the Ray into a media stand and not have to worry about the sound bouncing off of nearby surfaces. Since the Ray doesn’t have a mic for voice assistants, you don’t need to worry about whether it can hear you if you place it in a media stand, either. As with just about every other Sonos product, the Ray has touch-sensitive buttons on top to start and pause music and adjust the volume. There’s also an LED status light on the front, rather than on the top as it is on most Sonos speakers. Again, this is in case you put it on a shelf that would otherwise hide the light if it was on the top. On the back, there’s a power jack, setup button, ethernet port and optical audio jack; Sonos left out HDMI support to cut costs, and since the Ray doesn’t support more advanced audio formats like Dolby Atmos, the additional bandwidth HDMI allows wasn’t needed here. The setup process was simple: I just plugged the Ray into the wall and connected it to my TV with the included optical audio cable. From there, I finished setting it up in the Sonos app on my phone. The process will take a bit longer if you’ve never set up a Sonos speaker in your home before, because you’ll need to do things like authorize the various streaming music services you want to use. But I simply needed to wait for the app to recognize there was a new speaker to set up, tell it which room the Ray was in and then wait for it to get connected to my wireless network. Once that’s done, you have the option of tuning the Ray using what Sonos calls Trueplay. This uses the microphone on an iPhone or iPad to balance the speaker’s audio based on how your room sounds. It’s a bit of a weird process, walking around your space slowly raising and lowering your phone, but I’ve found it always makes my Sonos speakers sound better, so it's worth the five minutes it takes to set it up if you have a compatible device on hand. I’ve spent the last week or so watching movies and shows with the Ray and it’s an obvious improvement over my TV’s built-in speakers. Sonos said it focused on dialogue quality, bass response and a wide soundstage, and it definitely succeeded on two of those fronts. Dialogue sounds extremely clear, whether I was watching a drama like HBO’s The Staircase or enjoying Galadriel’s narration at the beginning of Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. The latter also provided a great chance to hear how the Ray performed in more intense, action-filled sequences. As the prologue of Fellowship continued to its massive battle against the forces of Sauron, swordplay and arrows flying filled the space around the narration in a well-balanced mix. And the rumbling explosion and massive thud of Sauron’s helmet hitting the ground after his defeat were a good opportunity to hear the Ray flex its bass muscles. Another favorite of mine for testing soundbars is the 15-minute intro of Pacific Rim. The beginning of this over-the-top movie has it all – huge battles between giant robots and monsters, cities being destroyed as panicked citizens flee and a solid heroic narration, all of which the Ray faithfully reproduced in a well-balanced mix. The Ray pulls this off despite having much simpler acoustics than the Beam: it includes two center midwoofers, two tweeters with split waveguides to broaden the speaker’s soundstage, a bass reflex system that provides a surprising amount of low-end performance, and four Class-D amplifiers. It’s an effective system, but my main complaint is that the waveguides and computational audio can only do so much to widen the soundstage. While the Ray clearly has a solid stereo presence, it’s not nearly as immersive as the first-generation Sonos Beam that I usually use. Even though my older Beam doesn’t support Dolby Atmos, its larger size and more complex speaker array give it a big advantage over the Ray. The Ray is also not the loudest speaker out there. Again, this isn’t a huge surprise, as Sonos is marketing this device for use in relatively smaller space. That doesn’t mean it was too quiet for me, but I did usually have its volume up over 50 percent for it to be loud enough. If I really wanted to kick things up while watching a big movie, I might get closer to 70 percent. If you’re the kind of person who really wants theater-style audio, you’ll be better off with a more powerful device. The good news is that, as with all other Sonos home theater devices, you can pair the Ray with the Sonos Sub to improve bass performance. You can also use two Sonos One speakers as rear surrounds to make for a much more immersive experience. The Ray might be an ideal choice for a first soundbar to upgrade your TV’s audio and then use it to build out a more complex setup down the line. That said, the Sonos Sub costs a whopping $749; it’s hard to imagine someone buying a Ray and then spending three times as much on a subwoofer. While the Ray is meant to be hooked up to your TV, it’s also a capable music speaker. Sonos says that when it builds its home theater products, music quality is just as important as how it works with movies and shows. In my testing, the Ray sounds great – songs like Dua Lipa’s “Future Nostalgia” and Carly Rae Jepsen’s “Cut to the Feeling” have plenty of low end and super-clear vocals. Meanwhile, the hard left- and right-panned guitars in Metallica’s “Wherever I May Roam” were quite distinct. While it’s still not the loudest speaker, the Ray is more than capable of filling a medium-sized room with clear and lively music. Naturally, the Ray has all the same multi-room audio features as other Sonos speakers. This means you can simultaneously stream the same music to multiple speakers on your WiFi network, or play something different on each one. You can set up custom speaker groups (just the speakers on your first floor, for example) and stream audio directly to the Ray using AirPlay 2. The only real feature it’s missing compared to most other Sonos speakers is voice control. There’s no mic, which means you can’t control the speaker directly with Alexa, Google Assistant or the upcoming Sonos Voice Control feature. That said, if you have other smart speakers, including any other Sonos speaker with a mic, you can use them to control the Ray. There’s no question in my mind that the Ray is a serious upgrade over a TV’s built-in speakers. What’s less clear is how much better it is compared to other small soundbars, like Roku’s $180 Streambar Pro. Sonos has a long history of delivering excellent sound, and the Ray continues that tradition. And just as the portable $179 Sonos Roam is a good gateway drug into the Sonos ecosystem, the Ray is a good first Sonos for someone who wants to improve their TV audio. Yes, you can find cheaper soundbars, but Sonos is betting its reputation for excellent sound quality will make the Ray a success. After spending some time with it, I’d have no problem recommending the Ray to anyone who wants an easy way to upgrade their TV’s audio but doesn't care about having the best speaker that supports the most formats. For a lot of people, particularly those with smaller living rooms, the Ray will be just the right soundbar for their space.

  • Sonos Voice Control

    The new Sonos voice assistant seems faster than the competition

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    05.11.2022

    Sonos devices have supported Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant for almost five years now. The Sonos One from 2017 was the first speaker the company made with built-in microphones, and almost every speaker it’s made since has worked with Alexa, not to mention Google Assistant. Despite supporting those popular services, though, Sonos has decided to build its own voice assistant. Dubbed Sonos Voice Control, the feature is specifically designed to work with music only.

  • Sonos Roam - Spring 2022 colors

    The portable Sonos Roam speaker is now available in three new colors

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    05.11.2022

    Once in a blue moon, Sonos releases its speakers in some fun colors or finishes, but most of the time, people just have to pick between black and white. But starting today, you can get the portable Sonos Roam in three new shades; Wave, Sunset and Olive.

  • Sonos Ray is the company's most affordable soundbar yet at $279

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    05.11.2022

    The Ray is Sonos’ most compact and inexpensive soundbar, which arrives June 7th. At $279, it’s not competing on price with bargain options like Roku’s $130 Streambar. But in an advance demo earlier this week, it was clear that the Ray is a powerful soundbar that will provide a massive upgrade over just about any TV’s built-in speakers.

  • Engadget Podcast

    Engadget Podcast: What's up with 'Overwatch 2?'

    by 
    Devindra Hardawar
    Devindra Hardawar
    05.06.2022

    So does the Overwatch 2 beta live up to all of the hype and anticipation? This week, Jessica Conditt joins Devindra to chat about Blizzard’s long-awaited sequel and why she thinks it’s worth the wait.

  • Sonos Move portable smart speaker

    Sonos may roll out its own voice assistant next month

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    05.04.2022

    Sonos Voice will reportedly be available on all S2-compatible smart speakers and soundbars.

  • Sonos Ray soundbar (leak)

    Sonos' rumored $250 soundbar is reportedly called the Ray

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    05.04.2022

    Sonos' low-cost Ray soundbar has surfaced in leaks that suggest it will be tiny, but still pack some useful features.

  • Sonos is reportedly releasing a $250 soundbar in June

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    04.21.2022

    Sonos isn't exactly known for affordability, but the company has released a few more inexpensive products in recent years like the portable Roam speaker. Now, according to The Verge, Sonos is going to release its first budget soundbar in the first week of June. Apparently codenamed "Fury," this product is expected to cost around $250.

  • Sonos Move portable smart speaker

    Sonos bought a startup that made a light-powered Bluetooth speaker

    by 
    Igor Bonifacic
    Igor Bonifacic
    04.11.2022

    Sonos has acquired Mayht, a Dutch startup best known for co-creating a Bluetooth speaker powered by light.