'The Last of Us Part I' accessibility options include DualSense haptic feedback for dialogue

The idea is to help deaf players 'feel the way a line is delivered.'

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A screenshot of The Last of Us Part I, showing Joel taking cover as an enemy walks close by. An onscreen indicator shows the direction of noise created by enemies.
Naughty Dog/Sony Interactive Entertainment

The Last of Us Part I, a complete remake of PS3 classic The Last Of Us, will hit PS5 on September 2nd (and PC at some point in the future). Not only will the game include all of the extensive accessibility options from 2020’s The Last of Us Part II, Naughty Dog has revealed some extra ones that it's including.

One that takes advantage of the DualSense controller seems particularly novel. “[A feature that] started as a prototype but ended up being really successful during playtesting is a feature that plays dialogue through the PS5 DualSense controller as haptic feedback," game director Matthew Gallant told the PlayStation Blog. "That way a deaf player can feel the way a line is delivered, can feel the emphasis, along with the subtitles to give some sense of how that line is delivered."

Another big accessibility update is audio descriptions for cutscenes. Gallant said Naughty Dog teamed up with a company that delivers descriptions for TV, movies and game trailers. The feature will be available across all the localized languages in The Last of Us Part I. “We’re expecting this to be an accessible experience for blind players, for deaf players, for players with motor accessibility needs,” Gallant said.

The blog post details all of the settings, including presets for vision, hearing and motor accessibility. You can expect visual aids and a way to zoom into a specific section of the screen using the touchpad. You'll be able to fully remap the controls — there's even the option to link a command to shaking the DualSense. There are also in-depth settings for motion sickness, navigation, traversal, combat, the heads-up display and, of course, difficulty.

It's heartening to see Naughty Dog place so much emphasis on making its games as accessible as possible. Not every developer has the resources of that studio, but here's hoping more game creators take inspiration from Naughty Dog's work in this area. In the meantime, if you want to find out much more about The Last Of Us Part I, you can read Engadget's review on August 31st.

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