Excited for the rise of hydrogen economies, but can't wait till 2015? If you work for the Norwegian, Swedish, Danish or Icelandic governments, you might get to see the future personally. Hyundai's signed a memorandum of understanding with the aforementioned four countries to deliver a test fleet of fuel cell electric vehicles, and the Nikkei Shimbun is reporting that the company will personally foot the (possibly quite reasonable) bill. Free hydrogen-powered SUV? Don't mind if we do!
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Hyundai Signs MOU to Supply FCEVs to Europe

- Hyundai joins FCEV test project with Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland
- Hyundai to supply independently-developed FCEV


The Hyundai Motor Group signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with four Northern European countries to operate a test fleet of Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEV) in the European market, paving the way to showcase the company's competitiveness in eco-friendly vehicles.

The initial agreement was signed yesterday in Seoul, attended by Mr. Woong-Chul Yang, President of the Hyundai Motor Group's R&D Center, Mr. Lars Vargö, the Swedish Ambassador to South Korea, and other government and company officials.

"We look forward to demonstrating our advanced eco-friendly technology in Northern Europe, which has great hydrogen infrastructure," said President Yang. "This agreement will be a stepping stone for the Hyundai Motor Group to lead the FCEV market in Europe."

In Northern Europe, the supply of FCEVs and construction of refueling stations are carried out by an agency called `The Scandinavian Hydrogen Highway Partnership (SHHP),' which works closely with related agencies in Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Iceland.

FCEV is part of the Hyundai Motor Group's multi-faceted approach to become most fuel-efficient and eco-friendly automaker in the world. Under Hyundai's Blue Drive initiative, Hyundai has introduced a wide range of eco-friendly products and technologies, including hybrid vehicles and the BlueOn electric car.

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Hyundai brings hydrogen vehicles to Europe, one free fleet at a time