Apple Watch at Colette in Paris

Can't help but give in to the hype surrounding Apple's "spring forward" event today? You'll have a few ways to satisfy your curiosity about the Apple Watch... and anything else Tim Cook might show. Apple is hosting its own live stream starting at 1PM Eastern, although you'll need to use an iOS device, an Apple TV or Safari on a Mac to tune in. Don't worry if video isn't an option, though. We'll be covering the event live at the same time, so you can catch the goings-on no matter what device you're using.

[Image credit: Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images]

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America is suffering from a lack of tech-savvy workers, and that's one of the reasons that wages are stagnant. It's enough of an issue that President Obama is launching TechHire, a program designed to get citizens into well-paid jobs in the technology sector. In short, the scheme is a way to increase STEM knowledge, connect workers to opportunities and break down the barriers between giving people a chance.

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Tesla Model S

Tesla hasn't had the easiest time selling electric cars, but things have been especially rough in China. The company has confirmed to the Wall Street Journal that it's cutting jobs in the country (180, according to the Economic Times) following slow sales. A spokesperson is adamant that the EV maker is "not just leaving," and is in it for the long haul. However, it's clear that the company has some work to do. Analysts at JL Warren Capital have learned that Chinese customers registered just 2,500 Tesla cars in the first nine months after the April 2014 launch -- a far cry from the 5,000 that Elon Musk wanted to sell in China that year.

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Why 3D print a computer animation? 'Art' is a good enough reason for us, and that's exactly what drove Dutch artists to put a hundred frames into a single mind-bending installation. Using an Ultimaker 2 3D printer and liberal amounts of glue and string, artists Job, Joris and Marieke squeezed all the cells from a short animation (below) into a single mise-en-scene. At a glance, you can see the fate of the teal-hued hero as he vaults off a cup and into a vase, with each detail (including a bouncing ball and shattered cup) faithfully reproduced in PVC. If you want to feel like you're inside a computer where time has lost all meaning, it'll be exhibited at Amersfoort's Kunsthal museum on March 29th.

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A supernova split into four by gravitational lensing

Gravity can play a lot of tricks with light, and we're not just talking about black holes. Take this recent Hubble Space Telescope discovery from UC Berkeley's Patrick Kelly, for example: those four lights are actually a distant supernova magnified and split into four images by the gravitational lensing of a giant galaxy. Besides looking cool, the image promises to be a gold mine for astrophysics. The time delay between those four lights will let researchers study both the properties of the exploding star and the galaxy, including the presence of dark matter. The best part? Due to the light's unusual path, there's a good chance that scientists will get a "rerun" in a few years if they want to see it again.

[Image credit: NASA/ESA/FrontierSN/GLASS/Frontier Fields]

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If you were still picking sides following the launch of HTC's One M9 and the Samsung Galaxy S6, there's now a bit more to work with. Retailer B&H Electronics has (accidentally?) revealed that a 32GB flavor of the HTC One M9 will start shipping on March 25th for $649, SIM-free. That's the exact same price (and release date) as last year's look-alike model and a bit less than an unlocked Galaxy S6 (non-Edge) is expected to cost. That said, you'll also need to weigh factors like Exynos versus Snapdragon CPUs and all-metal versus glass-and-metal designs. The listing could also be inaccurate or premature, so we wouldn't count on the pricing or date without official word from HTC.

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Selfie Stick

Selfie sticks, the logical "extension" of an already irksome activity, were recently banned in Premier League soccer stadiums. Now museums around the world are starting to do the same over worries of accidental damage to artwork. The Smithsonian barred their use effective last week as a "preventative measure to protect visitors and museum objects," especially on crowded days. Meanwhile, a formal ban is pending at Versailles palace and Centre Pompidou in France, and visitors are now being told to stow their sticks by guards at the Louvre. Both Pompidou and the Louvre will continue to allow regular photography and selfies.

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A castle in Minecraft

As a matter of course, Minecraft has required that you install Java's run-anywhere code base -- a big problem when that tends to introduce security exploits and annoying adware. However, the construction game should be considerably safer thanks to a low-key update in recent weeks. The Windows edition of Minecraft (OS X is coming later this year) now installs a standalone version of Java that's used only while you're playing. If you want, you can scrub the full version of Java without losing access to your blocky masterpieces. And the kicker? If you haven't been keeping on top of your software updates, the game may run smoother at the same time. It's not urgent that you get the upgrade, but it's definitely worth considering if you only bother with Java for the sake of living in Mojang's virtual world.

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V1331 Cyg as spied by Hubble

The Hubble Space Telescope spots a lot of stars, but some of them are seemingly more eager to pose for snapshots than others. Take the star you see above, for example. That's V1331 Cyg, a young stellar object that's conveniently sending a jet of gas directly toward Hubble, providing a clear (and rather dramatic) view that isn't clouded by interstellar dust, like its neighbors. Astronomers don't mind that V1331 is hogging the spotlight, though -- this scene offers an ideal way to look for signs of planetary formation and other phenomena that would otherwise be hard to detect. This could be much, much more than a pretty picture if it helps scientists understand how stars grow up.

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Here's a project that could pave way to structures both unique and affordable. A team of researchers from the UC Berkeley's College of Environmental Design has unveiled the Bloom Pavilion, which they call "the first and largest powder-based 3D-printed cement structure." It measures 9 feet high, 12 feet wide and 12 feet deep, with a traditional Thai floral motif design. The pavilion is not the first 3D-printed building, to be clear. A Chinese company built 10 houses in under 24 hours last year and finished a whopping 5-storey apartment block in January using 3D-printed parts. Plus, there's that 3D-printed castle in Minnesota. However, it was created using dry powdered cement, whereas other 3D-printed buildings were made by extruding wet cement through a nozzle.

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