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With iTunes overrun with apps that do little more than find creative ways to promote products or otherwise suck time, it's nice to see mobile technology doing something that's, well, not so trivial. VerbalVictor, a $10 program, which should be available in the App Store next week, uses iPhone and i

3 years ago 0 Comments
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We like to joke about reinventing the wheel, but that's kind of what NASA engineer Salim Nasser has done -- he won a $20,000 innovation prize earlier this month for designing a wheelchair where the occupant can pull, thus avoiding repetitive stress injuries associated with pushing by using the (typ

4 years ago 0 Comments
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We've seen quadriplegic transportation directed by brainwaves, speech and even the occasional Wiimote, but your best bet might be to follow your nose. Israeli nasal researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science unveiled a \"sniff controller\" this week, that measures nasal pressure to control a wh

4 years ago 0 Comments
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Making our all so stealthy escape from the Intel booth today, we came across the Reader -- the big chipmaker's text scanning device which reads aloud and provides a high contrast, large-sized reading facility for people with visual or mental impairments. We tried it out on a real quick and dirty sc

4 years ago 0 Comments
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It's still largely unclear just what the heck cellphone-sized doses of radiation do to the human body -- but whatever happens, you've gotta figure those effects are multiplied many times for folks spending their days standing in front of carriers' antenna arrays. An Alaskan equipment installer worki

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Early last year, gurus at the University of Michigan were devising a newfangled type of cochlear implant, but now it looks like the Wolverines are more interested in a fresh auditory nerve implant that is being dubbed \"a superior alternative\" to the (now) old fashioned option. The uber-thin electrod

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We've seen robots that help humans diagnose autism, but a team of researchers at the University of Hertfordshire have developed a number of robots and humanoids that can help autistic children cope and form relationships. The €3.22 million ($4.33 million) Interactive Robotic Social Mediators a

7 years ago 0 Comments
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No, this prototype toilet paper dispenser isn't for you lazy lumps out there, but rather serves to aid disabled folks who sometimes have trouble using those frustrating plastic boxes in public restrooms or even the simple rolls in their own homes. Called the 'TPer' -- we think -- this model operat

7 years ago 0 Comments
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As people age and develop ocular diseases such as glaucoma and retinitis pigmentosa, an unfortunate side effect is the gradual inability to locate and recognize objects not directly in front of them -- a condition more commonly known as tunnel vision. Previous gadgets designed to combat this proble

8 years ago 0 Comments