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Fujitsu bets the farm on SSDs

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Good news SSD fans: Fujitsu has halted their planned production of 1.8-inch hard disk drives due to increased interest in using solid state disks in handheld devices. A Fujitsu spokesman said, "We want to see if the market tips toward flash, or if it stays with hard drives." The move effectively leaves the 1.8-inch HDD market to the likes of Seagate, Toshiba, and Samsung. It's interesting to note that Fujitsu already offers SSD drives as options in their Lifebook Q and B laptops and P1610 Tablet PC. However, "their" SSDs aren't home cooked, they come by way of Samsung. To the best of our knowledge Fujitsu has no formal plans to enter the burgeoning flash drive industry at all; a market where Samsung already reigns supreme with Toshiba (via their partnership with Sandisk) coming on strong. With SSDs dropping in price by about 60% annually, we can't say that we blame Fujitsu for bailing.

[Via iLounge, thanks Erion 1]

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