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Verizon's 'six strikes' policy will reportedly make users watch an anti-piracy video before bandwidth is throttled

Donald Melanson, @donmelanson
January 11, 2013
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We got some details on Verizon's (and Time Warner Cable's) so-called six strikes policy for dealing with piracy back in November, but TorrentFreak has now turned up more details on just how it will work. According to a copy of Verizon's full policy obtained by the site, the six strikes are actually divided into three tiers, giving users increasingly serious alerts before their bandwidth speeds are reduced to 256 kbps.

The first of those are fairly straightforward emails and voicemails informing users that copyright owners have filed a complaint against them, but the second tier goes a bit further, automatically redirecting users to a website where they'll have to acknowledge that they've been receiving the alerts and then be prompted to watch an anti-piracy video. If you get to the fifth and sixth alerts, you'll again be redirected to a page where you must agree to either an immediate reduction in speed for two to three days or the same 2-3 day speed reduction delayed until 14 days later. At that point, you'll also be able to request a review of your situation, for which you'll be charged a $35. A TorrentFreak notes, Verizon won't take any further action after the sixth alert, but users could then face possible litigation from the MPAA and RIAA.

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