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Postmates' latest service brings you alcohol in 25 minutes or less

Right now, it's only available in Los Angeles and San Francisco.
Billy Steele
01.25.17 in Services
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Let's be honest: It sucks to run out of alcohol at times you really need a drink. And heading to the closest liquor store or beer shop can be a headache when you have friends over. Thanks to a new option from Postmates, that frustration could be a thing of the past. The restaurant and store delivery service will now bring you alcohol in 25 minutes or less.

For now, the new service is only available in Los Angeles and San Francisco, but the company says it plans to expand to "our other markets" in the near future. The process is similar to the one you would use to order food. All you have to do is fire up the app, find the beverages you want and place the order. Yes, beer, wine and spirits are all among the available options. Postmates will then pick up the order form a nearby store and bring it to you -- and check your ID.

If you're a Postmates Unlimited subscriber, you will receive free delivery on any beverage order. Non-subscribers will have to pay a fee unless they order $30 or more worth of booze. Heck, in the near future, your order could be delivered by robots.

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