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Image credit: Electric Jukebox

Electric Jukebox has a new music streaming karaoke machine

Meet the Roxi.
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Electric Jukebox

You might recall the Electric Jukebox, a wand-style microphone and streaming stick that let you sing along to a Spotify-style music catalog at home. The company is still around — in fact, according to Music Ally, its first device sold out five weeks after launch — and is back with a new version called the Roxi. The basic concept is the same: For £199/$199, you get all of the necessary hardware (you'll need your own TV, however) and a one-year subscription to its music library, which boasts "tens of millions" of tracks. Once the year is up, you'll need to pay £52/$52 every 12 months.

At first blush, it's an expensive proposition. But Electric Jukebox is bullish about the quality of its library and the pricing, which is cheaper than a 12-month Apple Music subscription. The difference, of course, is that your Roxi library is locked to a single device — you can't listen to those same tunes on your smartphone or PC. Instead, you're getting a living room experience that promotes party-play and karaoke shenanigans. There's a "Sing with the Stars" mode that let's you rock out to iconic anthems, a "Name that Tune" trivia game, and access to global radio stations.

To sweeten the deal, there's a "Sound Machine" mode that will fill the room with relaxing yoga and meditation melodies, as well as a photo feature that puts your favourite Facebook albums on the TV. As before, it's all backed up with a raft of celebrity endorsements that include Sheryl Crow, Robbie Williams, Alicia Dixon and Stephen Fry. On the business side, Electric Jukebox has raised $14 million (£10.8 million) and plans to IPO later this year. The company is certainly confident, though we're skeptical about the product and how its pricing will be received by the public.

Origin: Engadget UK

Nick is a reporter for Engadget, covering video games, internet culture and anything else that takes his fancy. He has a bachelor's in multimedia journalism and holds an NCTJ certificate. Before joining Oath, he was a staff writer at The Next Web and an investigative journalist at FE Week, an education-focused newspaper in the UK. He lives in Greenwich, London with a stack of half-finished Gundam model kits.

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