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Hackers hit The Wall Street Journal in support of PewDiePie

They posted a fake note apologizing to the YouTuber.
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John Lamparski via Getty Images

Hackers targeted The Wall Street Journal earlier today, posting a fake apology in support of PewDiePie. In a sponsored post, the hackers published a note that said the publication wanted to apologize to the YouTuber and "due to misrepresentation" by its journalists The Wall Street Journal would be sponsoring PewDiePie. The Wall Street Journal took down the page and a spokesperson told The Verge that the company would be investigating the incident. "The page was owned by WSJ. Custom Solutions, a unit of the advertising arm, which is not affiliated with The Wall Street Journal newsroom," said the representative.

Last month, a hacker exploited thousands of printers around the world, forcing them to print messages that asked people to subscribe to PewDiePie's YouTube channel. This latest stunt appears to be a response to both The Wall Street Journal's 2017 article about the anti-Semitic language used by Felix Kjellberg, aka PewDiePie, as well as PewDiePie's ongoing battle with T-Series, another YouTube channel, for the most subscribers.

Kjellberg has been in the spotlight a number of times for using racist and anti-Semitic language. It led YouTube to cancel his original series and Disney Maker Studios to end a deal with him. Kjellberg was also suspended from Twitter in 2016 for making an ISIS joke. Last week, he came under fire again for promoting a channel known for racist, anti-Semitic and homophobic content.

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