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'Rocket League' will replace randomized loot crates with 'blueprints'

You'll be able to see upfront what items you're buying.
Kris Holt, @krisholt
October 1, 2019
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Psyonix

Psyonix revealed in August it planned to kill off Rocket League's randomized loot crates. It's now laid out how it will replace them: with a new type of drop called blueprints.

After every match, you'll have the chance to snag a blueprint, which explains upfront what item you'll obtain if you buy it. You can pay for a blueprint (and item) immediately, or you can hang onto it in your inventory to purchase later. As with crates, painted, certified and special edition items will be available through blueprints. Psyonix also has a new item shop on its roadmap. It'll feature older items that appeared in crates along with new ones.

Both blueprints and the item shop will arrive in December, along with credits, which are replacing keys as the game's premium currency. You'll also be able to use credits to buy Rocket Pass Premium too, but they won't be valid for the esports shop -- only esports tokens will be valid there. Psyonix will automatically convert keys into credits and remaining crates into blueprints once the overhauled system goes live. Until then, one final vindicator crate will be available from Thursday, which includes a battle-car and a goal explosion.

Meanwhile, changes are afoot for Rocket League trade-ins. When the new cosmetics system is up and running, you won't be able to trade in paid-for items from blueprints, the item shop or older ones you got from crates. You'll still be able to trade in items from free post-game drops.

Psyonix reckons blueprints will offer more transparency about the digital goods you're buying. A major criticism of loot boxes is that you don't really know what goodies they contain. Some jurisdictions and regulators believe they're a form of gambling.

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