Amazon will let businesses use its Twitch streaming tech for livestreams

AWS makes it easy for clients to host livestreams on their websites and apps.

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Amazon Web Services has announced a new product that will give businesses an easy way to integrate video livestreams into their websites and apps. It’s called the Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS), and it will allow brands and corporations to provide a more personalized experience for their audiences compared to YouTube or Twitch livestreams. Speaking of Twitch, IVS uses the same technology that powers the Amazon-owned video platform’s livestreams.

Martin Beeby, Amazon Principal Developer Advocate, wrote in a blog post that he was “blown away by how simple the team have made it to integrate interactive, low latency, live video into an application.” AWS customers can start the process by creating a channel and then using any standard streaming software to stream videos to it.

They can personalize their streams to, say, show additional information or a buy button when specific products appear on screen. But IVS does the heavy lifting to make sure the video will be viewable to anybody in the world. Even better, the service includes access to a player SDK that makes integrating videos into websites and apps straightforward.

Seeing as businesses have to rely more heavily on livestreams and other virtual means to reach potential customers these days, IVS could end up being a hit among AWS clients. "Customers have been asking to use Twitch's video streaming technology on their own platforms for a range of use cases like education, retail, sports, fitness, and more,” Amazon IVS General Manager Martin Hess said in a statement. “Now with Amazon IVS, customers can leverage the same innovative technology that has taken Twitch over a decade to build and refine. Any developer can build an interactive live streaming experience into their own application without having to manage the underlying video infrastructure.”

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