Blackmagic

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  • Blackmagic drops Cinema Camera price to $1,995

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    08.04.2013

    Do you like the prospect of shooting 2.5K video with Blackmagic's Cinema Camera, but turn pale at spending $2,995 for the privilege? We have good news: Blackmagic just dropped the pro video camera's price to $1,995. While that isn't exactly impulse purchase territory, it's low enough to put the greater-than-HD shooter in the same price bracket as semi-pro DSLRs. Think of the discount as consolation for delays in launching the Production Camera 4K.

  • Blackmagic's 4K camera delayed, Pocket Cinema model to ship in '3-4 days'

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    07.26.2013

    If you've pre-ordered one of the two Blackmagic cinema cams announced at NAB this year, there's good, not-so-good and bad news coming out of a Blackmagic event yesterday. First the good: Blackmagic's Pocket Cinema model, which stunned observers with its 1080P RAW specs and sub-$1,000 price tag, should start shipping in a few days. That's close to the July 25th date promised for both cameras, although there could be a not-so-good caveat. John Brawley (who showed off the Pocket Cinema's first pristine images) told forum users that it would likely only have ProRes 422 support, and not RAW, at first -- though Blackmagic told us they "couldn't confirm" that. As for the bad part, those who laid down the most cash ($4,000 or so) will have to wait for the Production Camera 4K. The company told event-goers it wouldn't arrive until early September now, but when we reached out for clarification, it gave the following statement: With regards to the Production Camera 4K there is still several weeks of work to do before this enters full production manufacturing, however we expect to ship the first quantities of this model before the end of August. Still, given the company's track record of delays with the original Cinema Camera, you may want to avoid relying on that info for any time-specific projects.

  • Watch the first footage from Blackmagic's Pocket Cinema Camera (video)

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    04.26.2013

    Noted Blackmagic Design shooter John Brawley has released the first footage from the company's upcoming $995 Pocket Cinema Camera that might leave your DSLR green with envy. Though it's always tough to judge compressed web footage, to our eyes it looks completely untouched by the moire, aliasing and compression artifacts that tends to plague other digital cameras. While not specifying whether he used the compressed RAW setting or not, Brawley said he shot it using a Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 Micro Four Thirds lens with image stabilization turned on, meaning that feature's likely to be enabled on the camera when it arrives in late July. He also said he was "literally grabbing shots whilst I was shopping," which bodes well for serious filmmakers with a bit more time to spare. Head past the break to admire the video.

  • The Daily Roundup for 04.22.2013

    by 
    David Fishman
    David Fishman
    04.22.2013

    You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

  • IRL: Bluelounge Messenger and the Blackmagic Cinema Camera

    by 
    Engadget
    Engadget
    04.22.2013

    Welcome to IRL, an ongoing feature where we talk about the gadgets, apps and toys we're using in real life and take a second look at products that already got the formal review treatment. How do you make our one-man French bureau really, really happy? Obviously, the answer is to give him sparkling wine, a baguette and maybe a striped boatneck shirt. And also, hand him a $3,000 camera to tinker with. If you're at all interested in the three-grand Blackmagic Cinema Camera, Mr. Steve Dent has some detailed impressions (and complaints) after the break. And if you're not, we're still on the hunt for the perfect gear bag.

  • The Daily Roundup for 04.08.2013

    by 
    David Fishman
    David Fishman
    04.08.2013

    You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

  • Blackmagic announces Production Camera 4K, $995 Pocket Cinema Camera with MFT mount (hands-on)

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    04.08.2013

    A sub-$1,000 price tag makes any product a relative steal on the floor of NAB -- impressive specs and industry standard compatibility are just icing on the cake. If such figures are any indication, however, Blackmagic's new Pocket Cinema Camera, which leaked earlier today and ships in July, is potentially a very solid buy at $995, with a Super-16 Cinema 1080HD sensor with 13 stops of dynamic range, CinemaDNG RAW recording, SD card storage, Micro HDMI monitoring and a Micro Four Thirds lens mount. We got an early look at the shooter on the showroom floor, and the compact size is truly striking -- the body is comparable in size to any other mirrorless camera, though it definitely pushes the limits of what we'd consider pocketable. The design is very similar to Blackmagic's larger Cinema Camera launched at last year's NAB, with the same Micro Four Thirds lens mount. There's a very sharp built-in matte LCD for viewing footage and adjusting settings, and the build is quite solid -- it's significantly heavier than you'd expect. Naturally, the camera isn't as capable as Blackmagic's pricier NAB model, the Production Camera 4K, which also made its debut today and ships in July. With that flavor, $3,995 buys you a Super 35 sensor with native Ultra HD and 4K support, a built-in SSD recorder, compressed CinemaDNG RAW and compatibility with EF lenses. We spent a few minutes with that model as well, and were equally impressed. The screen was very bright, sharp and not at all reflective, and the camera includes your standard array of inputs and outputs, including dual mic jacks, an SDI port, power and control. Both models are very competitively priced, as you might expect from Blackmagic, and with this wide range of appeal, there's now a little something for everyone. Be sure to head past the break to check out our hands-on video as we take a closer look at both models. Update: B&H Photo now has both cameras up for pre-order with an expected availability of July 25th. Bearing in mind previous delays for BlackMagic Design's past model, you can place your order at the More Coverage links below. %Gallery-185012%

  • Blackmagic's Production Camera 4K gets full size cinema sensor, $3,995 pricetag

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    04.08.2013

    No matter how hard companies try and keep secrets, when it comes to trade show floors there's always the risk that someone will snap a picture and steal their thunder. The latest casualty is Blackmagic, which will be announcing both a Pocket Cinema Camera and this, its Production Camera 4K. We're fairly sure that this will sit above its Cinema Camera, offering a bigger Super 35 sensor, global shutter and Thunderbolt connector alongside the SSD recorder, touchscreen LCD and EF lens mount we found on last year's model. When the company gets around to announcing the hardware properly, it'll be available for $3,995 -- low enough to make even the most ardent of DSLR fans think twice. [Image Credit: Danielo Garcia]

  • Blackmagic's $995 Micro Four Thirds Pocket Cinema Camera gets snapped at NAB

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    04.08.2013

    We may lament the death of the point-and-shoot, but we doubt Blackmagic's forthcoming Pocket Cinema Camera will go as quietly into the night. Whilst wandering the halls at NAB, Danielo Garcia snapped a billboard announcing the device a little before its expected arrival time. The stats in the promotional flag (in full, after the break) reveal that it's the budget-brother of Blackmagic's Cinema Camera MFT. This new unit keeps the same Micro Four Thirds lens mount, with a Super-16 Cinema 1080HD sensor, 13 stops of dynamic range, lossless CinemaDNG RAW recording and Micro HDMI monitoring. When it's officially announced, the unit will retail for $995, putting smiles on the faces of indie filmmakers and people who need their Disneyland recordings ready for the silver screen. [Image Credit: Danielo Garcia]

  • Blackmagic launches Cinema Camera MFT with Micro Four Thirds mount, sans autofocus, for $3K

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    09.09.2012

    Blackmagic Design has thrown its Cinema Camera MFT into the Micro Four Thirds arena, but it will only work with lenses that have manual iris and focus capability. The shooter is otherwise identical to the original Cinema Camera, with a 2.5k, sub-MFT sensor; CinemaDNG RAW, ProRes and DNxHD capture formats; built-in SSD; capacitive touchscreen; and an included copy of DaVinci Resolve color correction software. That means cineasts already on board that format will have another mount for their glass, and MFT's mirrorless aspect will also permit other lens formats, like PL or Nikon, to be added with third party adapters. So, if the relatively low price, claimed 13 stop dynamic range, higher-than-HD resolution and new mount is enough to push your "start" button, check the PR for the entire skinny.

  • Blackmagic Design starts shipping Cinema Cameras in limited quantity

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    09.04.2012

    Remember that $2,995 Blackmagic Cinema Camera that shoots full-res 21:9 16:9 video? It's now hitting shelves, or maybe we should say "a shelf," because the initial shipment was "rather small," according to the company. The arrival date was pushed back earlier, and now the 2.5k, 12-bit RAW, sub-four-thirds video camera won't roll out in volume until the "parts supply ramps up." Meanwhile, B&H got a handful along with several other dealers, but if you just decided to order one for tomorrow's shoot, you may wanna cool your ardor -- there's quite a back order to get through, first.

  • Blackmagic Cinema Camera pushed back a few weeks, new footage shown

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    08.01.2012

    Unfortunately, there's a delay for cinéastes anxiously awaiting their 12-bit RAW Blackmagic Cinema Cameras, but the news isn't all bad. The camera is "in the final stages of Thunderbolt certification and internal testing" and manufacturing will follow as soon as that's done -- probably in the second week of August, according to the company. It will still hit the market with the $2,995 price tag, Canon lens mount, 15.6 x 8 mm sensor and built-in SSD recorder intact. In more positive news, the company has identified the cause of aliasing noticed by some viewers and blames it on the workflow used. It's posted a few new videos to back up the claim, which can be viewed at the source link below. Considering the company might soon have similar competition, it's probably best to work out any bugs before shipping a boatload out to finicky cinema clients.

  • Blackmagic Cinema Camera packs 'feature film' 2.5K quality, touchscreen for $2,995

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    04.16.2012

    While Canon, Sony and Red have already stolen the show with new camera announcements here at NAB 2012, Blackmagic Design is trying to carve out a niche for its new Cinema Camera. Priced at $2,995, where the company sees this as differing from the competition is its ability to capture film quality video on its 2.5K sensor and output it to CinemaDNG RAW, ProRes and DNxHD file formats. That camera housing can take Canon or Zeiss lenses on the front, contains a built-in SSD within and has a capacitive touchscreen display for control and metadata entry. Once you've captured the video, the included copy of DaVinci Resolve can take care of all color correction needs, while the video can be pulled from the SSD over a variety of high speed ports including BNC SDI and Thunderbolt. Check out a few in-person pics in our gallery below and more specs in the press release after the break.

  • Thunderbolt devices are still irritatingly thin on the ground

    by 
    Richard Gaywood
    Richard Gaywood
    12.11.2011

    Apple's announcement of Thunderbolt on Feb 24th was greeted by excitement, as Mac users became aware of the tantalising possibilities of this new high-speed port. There's lots of things Thunderbolt can do that were simply not possible before -- driving multiple external displays from a single port, "docking" a laptop to a selection of external ports via a single cable, expanding a laptop with high-performance desktop graphics cards. Then there are applications that older standards like Firewire and USB simply aren't fast enough to cope with, such as capturing uncompressed 1080p video or very fast external drives like RAID arrays or sold state drives. Our own Chris Ward went so far as to ask if Thunderbolt could foretell the end of the line for the Mac Pro as we know it, by allowing a Mac mini sized chassis to be endlessly exapanded via external Thunderbolt-connected peripherals. And yet... ten months later, if you go to Apple's store and search for 'Thunderbolt', you'll see just 11 products, three of which are Apple's own ultra-expensive Thunderbolt Display (plus its VESA mount) and the official Thunderbolt cable. There's three LaCie BigDisks, at $500 for 1 TB and $600 for 2 TB, or $900 for an ultra-fast SSD unit. There's four types of Promise Drobo-like RAID boxes, starting from $1150. Finally, there's a Promise Thunderbolt-to-Fibre-Channel adaptor, for $800 (Fibre Channel is an multi-gigabit enterprise-grade communication protocol used to connect with storage-area networks like Apple's Xsan, among other applications), allowing Thunderbolt-equipped machines to participate in distributed video workflows. None of these are remotely mainstream devices. The 2 TB LaCie disk is almost twice the price of an equivalent eSATA/Firewire model, at $329, which will be just as fast using eSATA as it is Thunderbolt. So where are all the devices that normal humans might want to buy? Has Thunderbolt arrived as more of a damp fart? My research for this post started when I was considering an iMac purchase. I'm not keen on Apple's official SSD pricing, because a top-of-the-line aftermarket model (twice as fast) is available for about $150 less. If possible, though, I'd also like to avoid the work of swapping my own drive in -- I'm sure I'll spend half my life trying to remove dust from the inside of the screen afterwards. Logically, I thought to myself, I should be able to buy some sort of reasonably priced Thunderbolt-connected drive bay that would be just as fast as an internal drive, right? Wrong. Such a thing doesn't exist. The only thing close is the $900 LaCie model I mentioned above, and it's a whopping $500 more expensive than the OCZ drive I am considering. No-one is offering a cradle you can put your own drive into. Nor can you buy... well, most of the things I mentioned in the first paragraph, actually. There's been plenty of promises from third parties, to be sure. Sonnet, in particular, has announced a broad range of exciting products, such as an Expresscard/34 adaptor (pre-order now, ships by December 14th). With that card cage, lots of expansion options open up (like eSATA ports). However, Sonnet's PCIe Thunderbolt Expansion Chassis, which will connect any normal PCIe x16 card -- like a high-performance graphics card -- and the RackMac mini Xserver -- which will convert a Thunderbolt-equipped Mac mini into a 1U server -- won't be available until "early January." Another raft of devices were announced at the Intel Developer Forum in September of this year, but manufacturers were long on promises and short on firm prices or ship dates. Blackmagic's HDMI capture device is available now, but that's a rather specialist piece of kit with a hefty $300 price tag. Belkin's Thunderbolt Express Dock (a dongle with Thunderbolt on one end and USB/ethernet/etc. on the other) won't be out until "spring 2012" and has no suggested price. mLogic's mDock looks interesting, but the company doesn't even have a full website up so we couldn't contact them for any updated information on when it might ship. Even Apple itself hasn't showed much follow through for Thunderbolt devices. We've got the Thunderbolt Display, with its extremely handy forest of ports which are ideal for laptop users working on a desk. The 27" 2560x1440 screen is certainly sumptuous, but at $999 it's a pretty specialised device -- and there's nothing else on offer. So, almost ten months after Thunderbolt was announced, its initial high promise is still mostly unfulfilled. TUAW reached out to several of the manufacturers mentioned above but frustratingly none of them would comment about why the peripherals have been exceedingly slow to ship. I have theories -- Thunderbolt remains highly expensive to implement and purchase, for example. Consider that a single Thunderbolt cable costs more than an entire eSATA-equipped drive dock. Also, despite Apple's high Mac sales of late, and all current Mac models (except the Mac Pro) coming suited and booted with at least one Thunderbolt port, there can still only be a few tens of millions of Macs out there with it. In the grand scheme of things that isn't a substantial install base for OEMs to target, compared to (say) the sheer volume of PCs with USB ports. Hopefully we will soon see Thunderbolt ports on PCs, which will help address both of these issues by giving OEMs a wider base to target and bringing some volume to manufacturing to bring prices down. For now, though, Thunderbolt's strong early promise remains mostly unfulfilled.

  • Daily Mac App: Disk Speed Test

    by 
    Samuel Gibbs
    Samuel Gibbs
    10.24.2011

    You've got a shiny new SSD-equipped machine, but you're wondering just how fast that SSD really is. Disk Speed Test from Blackmagic will give you a quick, straightforward answer. It's incredibly easy to use. Disk Speed Test writes large chunks of data to your chosen disk and then reads that data, giving you a real-world read/write speed in MB/s. The program then tells you what kind of uncompressed video that drive will be able to handle and allows you to save the results as a screenshot. As you can see from the image above, my magnetic hard drive-equipped MacBook Pro isn't going to win any speed awards. It also couldn't handle anything above uncompressed SD video according to the app -- but then again that's not the sort of thing I would even dream of trying. If you're looking to capture uncompressed video direct to a disk, Disk Speed Test will give you an indication of whether it's going to be up to the job. So, if you're curious about your hard disk speed, regardless of whether it's just a simple magnetic hard drive, an internal SSD, a network mounted disk array, or even a beast of a Thunderbolt SSD drive -- Disk Speed Test will quickly and easily answer that for you with just one click. Blackmagic's Disk Speed Test is available for free from the Mac App Store.

  • Thunderbolt accessories at IDF 2011: Belkin's Express dock, Seagate drives and PCIe expansion cards (video)

    by 
    Dante Cesa
    Dante Cesa
    09.14.2011

    Seeing as Wintel fans will soon join in on the Thunderbolt fun, how about a smorgasbord of devices toting the interconnect, conveniently laid out in a two pane vitrine here at IDF? Alongside the usual suspects -- such as LaCie's Little Big Disk, Promise's Pegasus and Sonnet's Echo -- are a few devices we've never seen before, namely Belkin's Express dock, some unnamed Seagate drives and two PCIe expansion chassis from Sonnet and Magma. We're particularly smitten with the latter two -- you know, dreams about extending our future Ultrabooks with some serious external graphics horsepower. Check out the entire spread in our gallery below and the video after the break. Myriam Joire contributed to this report. %Gallery-133792%

  • Blackmagic announcing a free version of DaVinci Resolve

    by 
    Chris White
    Chris White
    04.12.2011

    This week at NAB 2011, Blackmagic Design has announced version 8 of the very high-end dedicated color-grading solution DaVinci Resolve. The upgrade brings XML support, multi-layer timelines, curve grading, noise reduction, stabilization, automatic 3D matching and OpenCL acceleration to the solution, making it a substantial upgrade. Unfortunately, if you don't have an equally high-end paycheck then the US$29,995 price for the full system is probably prohibitively expensive, and even the software-only version costing US$995 may stretch many people's budgets. If you're in that boat, Blackmagic has some good news for you: it's releasing a free version in the form of DaVinci Resolve 8 Lite to "help promote the art of color correction."

  • Vodafone's HTC Magic gets unboxed on video

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    04.28.2009

    While white seems to have been the color of choice for most official demos of the HTC Magic, there's also a black version headed to Vodafone (and other carriers, eventually), and the folks at Netbooknews.de got their hands on one of those once mythical handsets for a video unboxing. As you can see above (and in the video after the break), the packaging is a pretty sparse affair, as are the bundled accessories, which includes only a USB cable, a power adapter, a basic wired headset, and a case that apparently "feels a little cheap." And, if by some chance you still haven't seen the Magic in action, you can get a glimpse of that in the video as well.[Via Android Community]

  • HTC black Magic (Sapphire) hands-on: a Vodafone exclusive

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    03.05.2009

    Make no mistake, the all-black HTC Magic is for real. Separated here at CeBIT from its glistening white counterpart by an equally white G1, this near-final Magic looked just stellar in its glossy dark coat. We chatted it up with an on-hand representative who confirmed that the handsets on display weren't absolutely finalized, and that when launched exclusively on Vodafone in Europe (you read that correctly), the Voda logo would be proudly plastered on. He stated that there were no immediate plans for selling an unlocked one in Europe or abroad, but that's just the standard line given when a carrier has yet to get their special toy. He also affirmed that HTC "believed deeply" in Android, and that the world at large would be seeing a lot more where this came from in the near future. Have a look at what these lucky Europeans will soon have access to in the gallery below.%Gallery-46910%

  • Blackmagic intros DeckLink HD Studio: "world's first" HDMI / analog capture card

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    01.13.2007

    Although Blackmagic already tossed out a budget-friendly way to capture direct from HDMI sources via PCI-Express, now the firm is hittin' the high-end by offering up the DeckLink HD Studio to handle both newfangled HDMI-capable decks as well as component / analog renditions. Thanks to the HDMI input / outputs and the multifaceted breakout D-sub cable, users can connect a variety of inputs new and old into a single card, and it also touts the ability to "instantly switch between high definition and standard definition video connections," giving you one less reason to ditch those analog decks you just can't stand to part with. The card supports HDMI (up to 1080i), component, and 14-bit analog video, and of course, plays nice with both Macs and PCs. Those looking to get serious about capturing, but aren't quite ready to go purely HD just yet, can pick up the DeckLink HD Studio for $995 and juggle both worlds.[Via MacNN]