XM

Latest

  • XM vehicle to showcase real-time "infotainment"

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    01.04.2007

    Although XM's supererogatory features that compliment the actual music transmissions have been available for awhile, the company is apparently going all out to demonstrate its latest inclusions at CES. Dubbed the "infotainment" concept vehicle, this mysterious whip will reportedly feature the "first personal weather tracking system for GPS navigation," which is intended to compliment XM's real-time traffic service (NavTraffic). The system is designed to focus on weather patterns for your specific route, and also provides short-term forecasts to help you decide whether the scenic route would suit you better. Partnering with Baron Services, XM plans to bring the WxWorx technology already used in "airplanes, boats, and emergency responders" to the comforts of your ride. Additionally, the company is set to showcase "in-car video systems" co-developed by On2 Technologies that can not only receive audio, but even video (sound familiar?) from the same satellites and ground repeaters that XM already delivers tunes by. Of course, we can expect to see a fleshed-out demonstration of the parking locator technology (dubbed ParkingLink) that has been in the works, and XM even plans to demonstrate a voice-recognition control scheme developed by VoiceBox Technologies. Notably, XM suggested that its weather-tracking system should be officially available "this summer," while the other introductions might just hold off until this whole "sorta maybe merger" thing gets ironed out.

  • Sirius wooing XM into merging?

    by 
    Ryan Block
    Ryan Block
    01.03.2007

    XM and Sirius, Sirus and XM -- fanboys, start your engines. Not that there's really much to go by here, but a very fluffy bit from the NY Times suggests that the company with the larger market cap (Sirius, at $5.26B) is increasingly saccharine about the idea of forming with its market-leading counterpart (XM, at $4.08B). Sure, judging by a number of statements and quotes from senior Sirius execs who seem anxious at the idea of cutting their losses, pooling their subscribers, and letting America live in one content-bountiful satellite radio utopia, one might think this is a real possibility. Unfortunately we don't yet have any real reason to believe there have been talks going on behind the scenes, nor has XM said much of anything of the idea -- and don't even get us started on what the SEC and FCC would think about the only two players in the market merging to become a sat-rad monopoly. We're not saying it's not gonna happen, but the NY Times is singing the same tune about an XM and Sirius merger that many have sung since day one. Still, Howard and Oprah peacefully coexisting on the same network? Bring it on.

  • Audiovox's XM2go X2G-100 Inno clone revealed

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    12.05.2006

    As exciting as it was to stare at the back of this thing a couple of months ago, we're kind of glad the FCC decided to flip the unit over and give us some more shots of this new satellite radio device from Audiovox. The latest in a series of XM2go clones, the X2G-100 looks like it's just about ready to party down with the Helix and Inno players, which were released earlier this year. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be a whole lot new here: the player features the same 50 hours of recording time as its siblings, and while Audiovox was kind enough to toss in those clunky, Sirius-esque antenna headphones, they left out the home and car kits, so it's a bit of a wash. We are liking the new all-black look, but assuming a similar price tag on this thing, we don't see much reason to go with this sucker when it debuts in February, since we're sure there'll be another generation of portable XM devices not long after. Keep reading for a couple more pics.[Via Orbitcast]

  • Dueling unboxings: Delphi SkyFi3 vs. Pentax K10D

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    11.24.2006

    Ok, so they don't exactly have all that much in common but, you know us, we can't just let good unboxings (or even not so good ones) slide by unnoticed. The first comes courtesy of the fine folks at Orbitcast, who managed to get their hands on Delphi's SkyFi3 portable XM satellite radio. While they're promising a full review in the coming days, like the good geeks that they are, they snapped a few shots of the box and its contents to whet your appetite. The second product to go through the traditional unboxing ritual is Pentax's K10D 10.2 megapixel DSLR, which found its way into the hands of a Flickr user coincidentally named K10D. If the pics above aren't enough for ya, you can check out a couple of bigger ones after the break, and then hit up the links below for the complete unboxing action.Read - Orbitcast, Delphi SkyFi3 - UnboxedRead - Flickr, Pentax K10D[Thanks, A. Parker]

  • Nexus Audio's T-2: the 1U AM/FM/XM Radio tuner

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    11.06.2006

    If you're in the market for a portable XM Satellite Radio tuner, there's plenty of options to keep you occupied, but if you're scouting a more studio-oriented alternative, Nexus Audio Systems has your gig. Claiming to be the "first Canadian manufacturer to receive approval to produce an XM Satellite Radio-ready tuner," the T-2 also touts AM/FM reception and a snazzy blue LCD display for showing off track and artist information. Geared towards "the custom AV market," the unit is housed a in rackmoutable 1U chassis, and was designed to play nice with the company's own C-6 series AV controllers. The brushed aluminum tuner features "audio grade" components and output circuitry along with a "highly regulated" toroidal power supply. While the firm doesn't list an expected price nor ship date, we're sure the mounties will be strapping the trifecta of tuners into that custom AV rack real soon. [Via Orbitcast]

  • Delphi's SkyFi3 receives FCC blessing

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    11.01.2006

    Even though CNET was able to get its grubby hands on a test unit to review, the SkyFi3 was apparently not yet really, really approved by the FCC for sale en masse. Nevertheless, Delphi had a right to feel confident, as the oh-so-powerful agency has officially given its blessing to the on-the-go XM device, and assured us all that it doesn't boast excessive transmission power which could prove harmful to our health radio firms' wealth. Dodging the ever-popular bullet of broadcasting signals too intense for humanity's well being, the SkyFi3 is free and clear to hit shelves "this holiday season" for $229, while "some retailers" will reportedly bundle in the $49 Live Wearable Kit (SA10252) for free during those mad end-of-year promotions. [Thanks, Dustin]

  • Radio companies want the FCC to recall offending FM transmitters

    by 
    Conrad Quilty-Harper
    Conrad Quilty-Harper
    10.28.2006

    It turns out that FM radio stations -- like NPR -- don't particularly like personal FM transmitters, such as the (pictured, blown-up) iTrip. While you're no doubt gasping for breath at this shocking revelation, we'll present the evidence. While certain countries have been hesitant to allow the use of FM transmitters, the use of such devices in the US has so far remained legal -- much to the chagrin of radio stations which "own" the frequencies that these devices broadcast on. Although the FCC has been investigating the issue of motorist's radio experiences being harmed by FM transmitters, specifically ones integrated into portable satellite radios from XM and Sirius, it seems that the radio companies still aren't satisfied -- to the point at which NPR has carried out its own investigation into the matter. Their findings were that 40% of the devices exceed FCC power limits, with a separate study showing that 75% of devices are too powerful. NPR's assessment that all offending transmitters should be recalled is a fair one, but their claim that "these modulators pose a significant threat" to public radio is a little dramatic. To us the solution seems pretty clear: if you are going to use an FM transmitter, make sure to choose a frequency that isn't occupied. You won't piss off other drivers (unless they're partial to a bit of static), and you'll get better sound quality. Everybody wins!**Except the companies that own the radio stations which you aren't listening to.

  • Delphi's SkyFi3 portable XM radio recorder / DAP reviewed

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    10.26.2006

    Now that the SkyFi3 is finally on the market and presumably safe from the RIAA / FCC, Delphi's jack-of-all-trades has been deemed a success -- at least mostly, anyway. The folks over at CNET were able to give the portable XM recorder / DAP hybrid a thorough once over, and they were fairly impressed with its functionality, but less than thrilled with its build quality and lack of an integrated receiver. Reviewers admired the "expansive and bright 2.8-inch display," 30 minutes of XM recording capacity, and the ability to playback your own MP3 / WMA files via the built-in microSD slot. It was noted, however, that the "budget build quality" left a lot to be desired, and the inability to listen to XM on the go without purchasing the "optional goofy headphones" was certainly not a strong point. The player, while not perfect, did perform as advertised, and was deemed a "flexible solution for home, car, and on the go for those who don't want to spend big bucks." But if you're looking to spend more time tuning in to XM Live on your daily run than in your daily commute, you may want to consider the lackluster "90 minute" battery life (when utilizing that oh-so-draining headphone receiver) before throwing down.

  • Delphi's SkyFi3 gets official-er

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    10.17.2006

    We've been tossed around a bit with this new SkyFi3 player from Delphi, but they've finally gotten one of those fancy press releases out for the thing, so hopefully this will stick. At least all the specs are the same: 2.8-inch monochrome display, microSD slot, external card-dock or Live Wearable Kit for live XM radio, 30 minutes of pause-replay, 10 hours of XM recording, etc. What's new is that the player's price has been jacked up to $230, and the release date has been pushed back to December 1st. Luckily, the Live Wearable Kit ($50) should come free with most retail purchases, but we're not exactly stoked about the price hike and new launch date all the same.Update: Delphi pinged to let us know the $230 package includes a running / wearable kit, whereas the base $199 package is for the regular car kit.

  • Details on new FCC-compliant satellite radio FM transmitters

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    10.17.2006

    The good folks at Orbitcast have the rundown on what the FCC's crackdown leaky FM modulators means for you and your next satellite radio; in short: more wires. The complete details on XM's and Sirius' answers to the FCC's demands have emerged in (what else?) FCC certification filings, with each company coming to similar solutions. Sirius' FM Extender, seen above, requires you to affix a wire inside the vehicle as close to the external FM antenna as possible which, in most cases, means a wire on your front or rear windshield. XM's FM coupler takes things one step further,with a coupling clip that attaches directly to the external antenna or sticks to an on-glass antenna. Not exactly an ideal solution in either case, though we tend to agree with Orbitcast's assessment that professional installers have got to be digging it. Too bad, too, we were kind of digging on the short-range pirate radio stations we'd been broadcasting in traffic these last few years.

  • XM's new "X2G-100" XM2go player found in FCC

    by 
    Ryan Block
    Ryan Block
    10.16.2006

    Details are still mondo sketchy at this point, but the FCC just delivered satellite radio fans a new present today: XM's "X2G-100" XM2go portable. Looks vaguely like a Pioneer Inno from the rear and we're hoping it's not some upgrade we're getting ourselves all worked up over, but if it was it'd likely not be filed by XM. Now watch as XM goes about its own business until one day it "suddenly" announces this mysterious device.Update: Steve T writes to let us know it might just be Audiovox's XM2go device. Could be, but we still don't know for sure if this is going to be that same device which will provide "the ultimate music experience."

  • Delphi's SkyFi 3 spotted

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    09.20.2006

    It's sure been a while, but Delphi is finally getting around to updating their SkyFi series with the new SkyFi 3 portable player, and the folks at xm411.com managed to get their hands on one for a little bit of alone time. They definitely like what they see, and while the bigger screen makes the device a decent bit larger than the Inno and Helix players, the unit should make for a good roadtrip companion, while still managing some portable action in a pinch. The 30-minute pause buffer is great for when you need to make a call or talk to your fellow car-riding companions, and the 8 hour battery isn't terrible for some pre-recorded XM action on the go. Unfortunately, the SkyFi 3 doesn't include a built-in antenna, so you'll have to strap on a dorky Wearable Kit (not included) to get live XM radio, and the battery can only handle 90 minutes of that. Luckily, the car kit is included, and the $200-ish price isn't too bad for what you're getting, so if it suits your purposes, it at least shouldn't break the bank.[Via Orbitcast]

  • Switched On: Why XM should nab Napster

    by 
    Ross Rubin
    Ross Rubin
    09.20.2006

    Each week Ross Rubin contributes Switched On, a column about technology, multimedia, and digital entertainment: