When Android Marshmallow arrives on your device, you can also get a really handy update for Google Translate. Instead of having to switch between apps to translate text, you'll be able to do some language switching right within the app you're using. Simply highlight the text you want to read or write up and click Translate when it pops up. You can use it, for instance, to read reviews on TripAdvisor about a hotel overseas, scan the LinkedIn profile of a person from another country or talk to someone who's not that fluent in your language on WhatsApp. Mountain View says the feature is ready to use with any app that takes advantage of Android's text selection behavior, and developers can easily update their applications to support it. It's already rolling out within this week, but you might get the latest version of Android itself later than that, depending on your device's manufacturer.

Samsung has given us a glimpse of the earnings report it's releasing in late October, and it shows an operating profit worth 7.3 trillion won or $6.25 billion for July to September 2015. That's a 79.8 increase from the same period last year, according to Reuters, and the company's biggest since the beginning of 2014. Bloomberg's analyst say the mobile division's profit "probably rose 24 percent to 2.2 trillion won ($1.9 billion), the first year-on-year rise in seven quarters." While the S6's shipments have reportedly dropped, a big price cut on Samsung's flagship and the release of lower-end, mostly below-$200 phones for developing nations made the increase possible.

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Verizon To Purchase AOL For 4.4 Billion

In the last year it's become known that Verizon uses "supercookies" (aka UIDH or Relevant Mobile Advertising) to track what its mobile customers are doing, but now it's taking a step further by quietly linking that information to ads from AOL (the parent company of Engadget, which is also now owned by Verizon). According to ProPublica, the AOL ad network reaches across 40 percent of the internet, and by working with Verizon's UIDH (Unique Identifying Device Header) it can track in great detail what apps people on Verizon Wireless use and what websites they visit. Unfortunately, beyond just serving up targeted ads, the information is also unencrypted and could possibly be used by others to track you. The only good news? Verizon subscribers can opt out, which you can do by following this link or calling 1-866—211—0874.

Neutrinos, conceptual artwork

The Nobel Prize for Physics has previously been awarded to scientists for things like the study of the Higgs Boson particle and for complicated work that deals with graphene. This year is no different with Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald coming across a discovery that has the power to change our current understanding of the universe. The two scientists are being awarded the prize for working out that neutrinos have mass. In case you're not down with physics-lingo, a neutrino is a subatomic particle that travels at (almost) the speed of light and passes through almost anything without effect. In fact, billions of neutrinos are passing through your body as you read this.

3D touch on the iPhone 6s

Right now, the only way to get a pressure-sensitive screen in a smartphone is to snag an iPhone 6s or wait patiently for the Force Touch version of Huawei's Mate S. You won't have to be quite so picky in the near future, though: Synaptics has unveiled ClearForce technology that brings pressure sensitivity to many phones (read: Android). The tech enables the kind of finger-savvy features you've already seen in the iPhone and Mate S, such as contextual menus and photo zooming, as well as extra tricks like scrolling and choosing special keyboard characters. Synaptics isn't saying just which phone makers like the concept, but "leading" brands should launch their ClearForce devices sometime in the first quarter of 2016.

AT&T ATandT Store, 2/2015, by Mike Mozart of TheToyChannel and JeepersMedia on YouTube #ATandT

AT&T has received a waiver for its long-awaited WiFi calling feature from the FCC after it was delayed (yet again) by the lack of options for deaf users. It was already made available on a beta version of iOS 9 sometime ago, but it couldn't be launched alongside the platform, since the FCC requires services like it to support teletypewriter (TTY) for the hearing-impaired. The newer technology that the carrier wants to use with it called real-time text (RTT) won't be available until 2016. In a statement posted on the company's website, senior executive vice president Jim Cicconi said that while they're all grateful their request was granted, they're still wondering why T-Mobile and Sprint were allowed to offer WiFi calling without a proper waiver from the commission.

Google's Creative Lab has released an interesting, and potentially super-helpful, new app on Tuesday called Meter. It transforms your boring, static wallpaper into a functional Material Design widget displaying either your remaining battery life, Wi-Fi signal strength or number of pending notifications. The widgets cycle whenever you turn off the screen so you'll never get stuck counting reception bars. But don't worry, the OS info bar isn't going anywhere The app is free and, being a Creative Lab joint, is open sourced on GitHub.

Tesla Motors Inc. Model X SUV Reveal

As is his wont, Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk was Tweeting up a storm Friday afternoon, following the Wednesday-night debut and hand over of the first "Founder" edition Model X crossovers. Among the missives was this little gem, now deleted, which read, "there will be a Model 3 and a Model Y. One of the two will." Since the Tweet was in response to "Not gonna lie, I'd sell my soul to @elonmusk for one. Please tell me the Model III crossover will have these doors!", from @AwesomelyOZ, we know he was talking about the unique rear portals.

Spain Solar Powered Fashion

One of the biggest obstacles to adopting solar or wind power is simply the cost of getting started. However much an electricity company might save in the long run, that up-front expense is tough to swallow. Or rather, it was -- Bloomberg New Energy Finance study has found that the cost of clean energy has dropped so much that it's within spitting distance of dirty sources like coal and gas. The global average cost of onshore wind power has dipped to $83 per megawatt-hour, while silicon solar power now costs $122. Neither of those figures is trivial, but they're not much different than what firms pay for coal (which has risen to $75 per MWh in the Americas) or gas turbines ($82 per MWh). Some green tech is still expensive, such as offshore wind ($174) and marine ($400-plus), but prices have fallen there, too.

Samsung Galaxy at Austin City Limits Music Festival 2015

Last we heard, Verizon was still evaluating whether or not it would support Samsung Pay. But today the carrier shared some good news, revealing it will open its doors to the Korean company's mobile payment solution. Unfortunately, Verizon decided to keep the announcement vague, only going as far as saying that support for Samsung Pay is set to be available "through a future software update." Once it arrives, though, you'll need to have a compatible device to take advantage of the feature -- and this includes the Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge, Galaxy S6 Edge+ and Galaxy Note 5. Hang tight, at least now you know it's actually coming.

Android Auto in a Hyundai Sonata

If you ask Motor Trend, Porsche is leery of supporting Android Auto. The sports car badge supposedly refused to use it due to an agreement that required sending Google tons of data about a vehicle, from its speed to its oil temperature. That would be pretty damning if true -- but it's not, according to the search firm. Google tells The Verge that it doesn't collect any of the information mentioned in MT's Porsche piece, and that you only opt in to sharing things that improve your Android Auto experience, such as hands-free control and navigation.

Android M : Marshmallow

Google has started rolling out Android 6.0, aka Marshmallow, to a handful of Nexus devices. But, as great as that is, there are still millions of people who have to wait for third-party manufacturers or carriers to get the update. Thankfully, companies like HTC, Motorola, Samsung, Sony and T-Mobile are already outlining their plans to distribute the latest, tastiest version of Android. Not everyone will be happy, of course, but the list of smartphones set to receive Marshmallow isn't bad -- and chances are more will be added over the next few weeks. "So, am I getting it," you ask? If so, when? Let's find out.

Controversial Cyber Bill Leaked In Cambodia

To better accommodate its users in emerging markets, many of whom only have access to 2G signal, Facebook announced a number of improvements to News Feed on Tuesday. In short, the news services has been revamped to ensure that it loads efficiently, regardless of network speed or the model of device being used. So if you're trying to load News Feed from a flip phone on a shaky connection, the service will push fewer video posts (which wouldn't load anyway) in favor of more status updates and link posts.

The wait is almost over, Star Wars fans: a new Battlefront is almost upon us. On Thursday, EA will open the Star Wars: Battlefront beta to all players, giving the gaming community it's first mainstream taste of online competitive multiplayer Star Wars since 2005. Can't wait? Tune in to Engadget Playdate at 6PM ET (3PM PT) on Twitch.tv/Joystiq, the Engadget gaming homepage and right here -- Tim Seppala and I made a deal with Jabba the Hutt and nabbed a few PC and PS4 beta codes early. Play your cards right (by answering stupid questions in our chat) and one could soon be yours.

Reddit's Ask Me Anything videos are getting off to a very good start. The social site has just posted its first batch of these moving AMAs, and one of these stars none other than Neil deGrasse Tyson, the Hayden Planetarium director known for making astrophysics accessible to everyone. As you might guess, the video format gives deGrasse Tyson the opportunity to answer with the kind of depth and expressiveness that you don't get with a text reply. Among other things, he chooses the universe's best art (spoiler: it's not a painting) and explains why he doesn't like mind-altering substances.

What would happen if you took the large, open-world chaos that defines the Far Cry series, removed the guns, vehicles, modern weapons and political character motivations? You'd have Far Cry Primal -- a survival epic staged in a re-imagined stone age. It's a different, but intriguing idea. The player takes on the role of Takkar, a lone hunter trying to survive on his own in the savage land of Oros. Really, the trailer says it all.

For all its promise and potential, the original Microsoft Band wasn't exactly a runaway hit. It's OK -- they can't all be winners. Even more surprising than the Band's existence in the first place is that Microsoft is taking another crack at the fitness gadget formula with a 2015 model of its oft-scorned wearable. It's a little smarter and a little sleeker, and maybe -- just maybe -- that'll be enough to change a few minds on the matter.