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Last week, the internet was awash with journalists' interpretations of Spotify's new privacy policy. Depending on whom you ask, the policy was eerie, creepy or just downright atrocious. While Spotify scrambled to reassure us that it wasn't really interested in snooping through your photos or tracking your every move, people publicly quit the service, argued with its CEO and generally hated on the company. Such public outcries are now commonplace. But what is it about the industry that evokes such an endemic distrust? Why are we so quick to believe they're out to do us harm? Aaron Souppouris and Devindra Hardawar try to get the bottom of the matter. Or at least argue about it.

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Researchers have completed a novel study that may help the wind farm industry avoid protected golden eagle habitats. Wind turbine blades reportedly kill up to 300,000 birds per year in US, which is admittedly a small percentage compared to those killed by your cat. Still, the golden eagle is particularly susceptible, considering that around 100 individuals were killed last year by a single wind farm in Altamont, California -- and there are only 500 breeding pairs in the state. The new study posits a simple idea: Why not plot both golden eagle habitats and the areas with the best wind farm potential, and make sure the areas don't intersect?

NASA-funded research has created a material that could self-heal in seconds. Two layers of solid polymer sandwich a gel that with an ingredient that solidifies on contact with air (i.e. when one or both of the outer layers is damaged). This differs from other approaches that rely on a mostly-liquid compound, or similar, slower techniques. The protective applications in space craft (like the ISS) are obvious, and could add a vital line of defense against dangerous debris. The ISS already has shields to protect it, but reactive armour in the event of damage would be even more reassuring. Back down here on earth, the same material could be used in cars, pips, containers and even phones (beyond scratches). Watch the material get shot and self-heal in the video below.

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Today on In Case You Missed It, Usain Bolt may be the "fastest man on Earth" but he can't outrun a cameraman on a Segway. An amatuer drone pilot stumbles across a sunbather 200 feet above the ground. NASA puts its 3D-printed rocket engine pump through a grueling series of tests. The UK showcases its amphibious weedwhacker and some delightfully demented genius has recreated the Pokemon theme song within Grand Theft Auto V.

If you come across any interesting videos, we'd love to see them. Just tweet us with the #ICYMI hashtag @engadget or @mskerryd. And if you just want to heap praise on your handsome guest host, feel free to hit him up @mr_trout.

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DirecTV and AT&T are sitting in that proverbial tree, but that isn't going to stop any telecom competitors from throwing rocks their way. Case in point: Sprint is running a promo that gives DirecTV customers a year of free cell service by switching to the Now Network. Of course you need to either be a new customer or adding an additional line of service through the telco, and even then it has to be either a Sprint Lease, iPhone Forever, Easy Pay or you have to cough up full retail price for a phone to take advantage of this. If you qualify for this sweet action you'll need to upload your recent satellite bill to the carrier's website. A $36 activation fee applies as do taxes and service charges that accrue on a monthly basis. Should you want in on this deal it'd be wise to hurry as it ends September 30th.

Inside The 2015 E3 Electronic Entertainment Expo

The Xbox One is a large console, but it seems Microsoft is in no rush to unveil a slimmer model. The company was rumored to be launching an "Xbox One Mini" in October, but Phil Spencer, Microsoft's head of Xbox, has shot down the idea on Twitter. His "not real" statement is pretty definitive, although of course, that doesn't mean Microsoft isn't planning a redesign for a later date. Although the Xbox One's sales are behind the PlayStation 4, it has a slew of exclusives coming out this fall including Halo 5: Guardians, Forza Motorsport 6 and Rise of the Tomb Raider (okay, that last one is actually a timed exclusive). If Microsoft is working on a "Mini" model, it's more likely to appear at somewhere like E3 next year.

Mirrativ

Japanese mobile game company DeNA has launched an app called Mirrativ that lets you livestream anything and everything that's happening on your phone. Think of the app as a mix of Periscope and Twitch -- yes, there are plenty of ways to stream your face and your games to the world, but with Mirrativ you're not limited to just either-or. DeNA is also targeting a broader range of uses than just gaming. What else might you like to stream? Speaking with The Wall Street Journal, DeNA's Junichi Akagawa says that users could perhaps browse online stores while seeking "shopping advice" from followers, or read news articles and share their thoughts on the topics.

Android Auto developers now have way to try out their apps without spending lots on an actual head unit or entire car. The Android Auto Desktop Unit (DHU) runs on your Windows, OS X or Linux desktop and works in conjunction with the companion app on Android 5.0 (Lollipop) or higher. Installing it is a bit of a rigmarole and you'll need to connect your Android device via a USB cable, but you probably already know that if you're a developer. Once you've compiled and installed your app, it'll "behave as if it's connected to a car," according to Google.

Google has transformed Android search for apps and now displays the results in a pictorial, grid-like fashion. For instance, searching for "music apps" (either in Now or a browser) brings up the above grid, and clicking on a given app will take you straight to Google Play, as you'd expect. The feature, spotted by Android Police, appears to have rolled out over the last few days. Regular search results are still displayed below, but the grid images take up the entire first page, in much the same way as Google's Knowledge Graph. It only works on Android, so far -- doing a similar search on iOS yields a regular app list with the option to install.

While there are already a handful of connected wearables for kids in the market, here's one with a more complete set of features. Courtesy of Chinese tech giant Tencent, this QQ Watch comes with a 1.12-inch 128 x 128 OLED screen, IP65 ruggedness, an SOS call button and its very own 2G radio. More importantly, though, the tracking functionality uses GPS, WiFi and cellular triangulation simultaneously for higher accuracy. There's even a 0.3-megapixel camera on board, and since the watch can be hooked up to WeChat, lost kids can send photos to their parents as an extra clue for locating them. Battery life? It's good for up to five days, apparently, after which you can charge up the watch with its magnetic connector. There's no word on the pricing just yet, but a company rep said it'll be "very affordable," and it'll launch in China in October, followed by global rollout before end of the year.

After pushing out updates that focus on making its visuals better, Vine (for iOS and Android) is getting a major upgrade that introduces a bunch of new music features. The one that sounds most useful for creators, especially if you need a bit of help to quickly edit tracks for posting, is "Snap to Beat." Once you switch it on, the app can find the perfect part of the song to create a never-ending music loop with. You can, however, disable it anytime to add sound effects or to customize your BGM. In case you want to use a popular song, though, just click the app's music note icon to access a new scrollable Featured Tracks section full of well-known singles you can add straight to your six-second videos.

Around 7,000 NYC cabs are currently beta testing a new e-hail app called Arro, which the industry hopes can help it get back the customers it's lost to Uber. Arro isn't the first hailing app for cabs -- it actually works quite similarly to Uber -- but the startup believes it can do better than its predecessors. Why? Because; (a) it doesn't have surge pricing, meaning you'll just have to pay whatever shows up on the meter, and (b) it has a partnership with Creative Mobile Technologies (CMT). That's the company that controls the video screens and payment systems in about half of the 20,000 green and yellow cabs in the city.

Discovery hasn't jumped the shark yet, but it's definitely gotten really, really close to a few ferocious sea beasts. Discovery VR is the company's new foray into virtual reality and 360-degree experiences, and it begins with a series of short-form, shark-infested videos from Mythbusters. It also launches with Gold Rush and Survivorman spin-offs, showcases of freeboarding and surfing, and tours through California's Half Moon Bay and Muir Woods. We first heard about Discovery shooting Mythbusters and other shows in VR back in May. The Discovery VR videos can be viewed online, via mobile apps for iOS and Android, and in Google Cardboard or Samsung Gear VR. Oculus support is "coming soon," though probably not before the Rift actually launches in Q1 2016.

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Right now, there's a bit of an issue going on with Twitch and the PlayStation 4's horror-movie-director simulator, Until Dawn. Yesterday the Twitch Support Twitter account posted that if you were using PS4's built-in Twitch sharing functionality that Sony had disabled archiving. Based on the response we got from Sony, it doesn't seem like it was for a nefarious reason or anything, mostly just forgetting to flip a switch.

That rectangular, encrypted Turing Robotics phone that one of our editors called "charmingly quirky" is ready for release. In fact, it will start shipping out on December 18th -- that's also when Star Wars: The Force Awakens hits theaters, and yes, the company rep admits, it's not a coincidence. The Turing phone has a 5.5-inch 1080p screen, features encrypted communication and is built from a metal alloy called liquidmorphium, which is apparently stronger than titanium. Turing Robotics already gave people the chance to reserve units sometime ago, but if you want the "Dark Wyvern" special edition, you can pre-order one on September 24th.

According to HTC, reports that the commercial launch of its Vive virtual reality headset is delayed until next year aren't telling the whole story. The company provided a statement to Engadget saying "We'll have a limited number of units by the end of the year, with more to come in Q1 2016." It seems unlikely there will be enough to satisfy all potential buyers of the "first complete VR system" it's making with Valve's help, but there's still a chance you could get one, and developers have had access for a while. The Vive headset is coming to PAX Prime in Seattle with demos like Fantastic Contraption -- once we know more about when you can have one we'll let you know.

The 2015 Tesla Model S P85D is officially the highest-rated vehicle ever tested by Consumer Reports. In fact, it's so good, it actually broke the magazine's rating system, achieving 103 points on a 100-point scale. The reviewers call the sedan "a glimpse into the future of the auto industry." They actually had to re-evaluate their criteria to give the EV a maximum score.

This phone has a bendable screen, and it isn't just for show: it's equipped with a bending sensor and can actually be used as a form of input, like a stylus or your fingers on touchscreen displays. Our colleagues at Engadget Chinese got a chance to check the concept out at Touch Taiwan 2015, where it was being showcased by local manufacturer AUO. The company claims the device and its 5-inch, 1,280 x 720 AMOLED screen is unbreakable -- true or not, it does look a lot more pliable than, say, the LG G Flex 2, as you can see in the GIF after the break.

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From user-made clips to content from big media properties, video is all over Facebook (and more people than ever are using the social network). Along with that trend comes the problem of piracy: plenty of video publishers are seeing their work distributed on Facebook without their permission, and now Facebook says its going to do something about it. In a blog post today, the company says it is building a new video matching system for a "subset" of video publishers. Facebook says that its tool will "evaluate millions of video uploads quickly and accurately, and when matches are surfaced, publishers will be able to report them to us for removal." For starters, this tool will launch in beta with selected partners, but Facebook intends to roll it out more broadly as it gets more effective.