Space telescopes are great, but they're hardly the cheapest things to build, launch and maintain, which means scientists are forced to make compromises. The solution to this problem isn't to build a better rocket with a bigger carrying capacity, but to rely upon a low tech way to make any party fabulous: glitter. Researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory believe that the high-tech equivalent of shreds of foil could be used as a cheap and lightweight alternative to the hefty mirrors you'd find in the Hubble Telescope.

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The Harvard professor that brought us a real life smell-o-phone has announced that he's expanding his olfactory-focused products to include eBooks, songs and clothing. Now clothes that give off a scent isn't that weird, but eBooks and songs? How does that work? Professor David Edwards is calling these unusual digital tomes and music "oBooks" and "oSongs," and they pair up with his company's, Vapor Communications', "oPhone" contraption. That device (see above) contains all the scent chips meant to be mixed until it matches the specific scent indicated by the files. When it was launched last year, it was only good for giving off scents attached to messages indicated by the sender through its accompanying app.

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Remember Project Cars, the beautiful sim racer from the team behind Need for Speed: Shift? Well, it's finally coming out, and relatively soon. Or at least that's what developer Slightly Mad Studios is promising, anyway. After three embarrassing delays, we've got a new release date for your calendar: May 6th. The game will be available first on PC (via Steam) in the US before a staggered international release on PS4 and Xbox One: it'll arrive in Europe and Australasia on May 7th, followed by the UK on May 8th and North America on May 12th. There's no word on the Wii U version though, which is a little worrying.

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Free. It's a price we love. Ironically, free usually comes at a price. Today, that price, is the loss of Amazon's try-before-you-buy TestDrive service for Android apps. It turns out, with more and more apps being free (at least to download), there was less demand for a service that let you test 'em out in the browser/virtual machine. Makes sense. Accordingly, Amazon has pulled the TestDrive feature from the appstore -- this has no effect on any apps that used it, just the feature is gone. The downside being there's no longer a way to (easily) check out apps that don't use the free-to-play/freemium model on Amazon's store any more. But, coming full circle... that's the price you pay for having more free apps, right?

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NASA's top priority is still taking humans to Mars, and it says private companies who want to do the same don't stand a chance without its support. Administrator Charles Bolden told a US House budget committee, "our ultimate focus is the journey to Mars and everything comes back to that," adding that the agency still plans to land there by the 2030s. A manned mission to Mars is crucial because the red planet was likely habitable in the past, and scientists must find out what went wrong to prevent a similar disaster on Earth. Bolden went so far as to say that humans need to "get away from being Earth-reliant... (and) Mars is the planet that is the most like Earth."

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Remember that crappy, top-down Halo game that came out a few years ago, Spartan Assault? Well, it got a sequel that's available on Steam, Windows 8, Windows Phone 8, and as weird as it sounds, even iOS. Anyhow, Halo: Spartan Strike will run you $5.99 or, if you're using one of Apple's mobile gizmos or a PC, you can grab the first game and the new one in a bundle for $9.99. Spartan Strike's story is a simulation (much like the last one was) set during the events of Halo 2 -- but there's a twist. Remember the cool new enemies from Halo 4, the Prometheans? They're in this game too, which raises more than a few questions regarding its fiction and timeline.

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The Dawn spacecraft has recently captured the sharpest pictures of Ceres to date, showing the dwarf planet's bright, sunlit north pole. NASA's space probe has been steadily making its way to the celestial body since 2012 after a 14-month stint orbiting the asteroid Vesta. It fired up its ion thrusters in March to slowly approach the Texas-sized proto-planet and settle into orbit, until it reaches an altitude of 233 miles from the surface. Its ultimate goal? To take 3D images and create a high-res map of Ceres, which might harbor some form of water.

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Pull to refresh in Chrome for iOS

Don't like that Chrome makes you use two hands to comfortably surf the web on your iPhone 6? Your life just got a bit easier. Google has updated Chrome for iOS so that you can pull down to not only refresh web pages, but open and close tabs. At this rate, you might only have to reach up when you want to type in a site address. There's also a Today View launcher widget that includes voice search, suggested answers for common searches and support for password managers like 1Password and LastPass. All told, you should spend more time browsing and less time stretching your fingers -- that's a worthwhile upgrade in our books.

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Whistle on a blackboard

When it comes to whistleblowing, privacy is paramount -- just ask Edward Snowden. It's also why news from an American Civil Liberties Association report (PDF) about anonymous government tiplines not using HTTPS encryption is all the more alarming. In a letter to Tony Scott -- not the late filmmaker, the United States chief information officer -- the ACLU's Michael W. Macleod-Ball and Christopher Soghoian implore the government to fast-track efforts to swap the some 29 websites that are required by law to protect the anonymity of tipsters over to HTTPS. If that can't happen immediately (Scott has a two-year plan to encrypt all government websites) then the ACLU suggests allowing people to use the Tor browser for alerting the authorities about fraud or waste in the interim. Currently, the anonymity-minded browser is blocked by certain federal agency websites.

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If you have no choice but to use an XP computer (workplace or school just can't let go, huh?), at least load it with a third-party browser, like Chrome. Why? Google has decided to continue supporting Chrome for XP until the end of 2015, so you can keep the machine safe from browser-based attacks a bit longer. And yes, that means you're getting all upcoming features and security patches. Mountain View was originally going to abandon the browser this month but changed its mind -- the company didn't explain why, though it's most likely because the antiquated OS refuses to die despite Microsoft cutting off its updates a year ago. Now, in case you find yourself still using an XP computer by 2016, you can either switch to Firefox (which doesn't have plans to end XP support) or convince the boss/dean that it's high time for an upgrade.

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