This post was done in partnership with The Sweethome, a list of the best gear for your home. Read the full article at TheSweethome.com

If you need an all-purpose digital kitchen scale for baking, cooking by ratio, or even measuring beans to brew coffee, the Jennings CJ4000 ($26) combines some of the best features we've seen in a scale. It's easy to use and store, comes with an AC adapter to save on batteries, and you can disable the auto-off function so you can take your sweet time mixing or brewing. The Jennings costs only a few dollars more than a bare-bones model, but does something none of them can: it measures in half grams for even better precision.

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A look at two alternatives to those $200 Beats headphones

Thanks to Beats, there's no shortage of $200 headphones on the market. But what about cans coming from folks known for their speakers rather than their rhymes? Given their heritage in the audio space, I had high hopes for both the Klipsch Reference On-Ear Premium headphones as well as Polk's Hinge Wireless Bluetooth cans. At first glance, they're pretty comparable: Both are foldable on-ear models with plush carrying bags and tight iOS/OS X integration. As it turns out, the similarities fell away quickly once I actually put them on my skull.

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If you're a fan of Nintendo, chances are you're also a fan of Splatoon producer Hisashi Nogami, although you may not know it. Nogami joined the famed Japanese video game giant in 1994 and has been an essential member of EAD, the first-party development studio responsible for some of Nintendo's most beloved games, ever since. Early in his career, Nogami worked primarily as an artist at Nintendo, designing some of the iconic imagery in games like Yoshi's Island and Super Mario 64. But it wasn't until 2001 that he got his big break with Animal Crossing, an N64 title he co-directed with Katsuya Eguchi.

In recent years, Nogami's work has focused more on the quiet details that surround the Nintendo game experience, as he's worked on both the Wii U's menus and its Mii avatars. Splatoon, his first major AAA work since Animal Crossing: City Folk in 2008, hits Wii U this week with a splash of messy color and an online component. In advance of the game's release, I spoke with Nogami over the phone (via translator) to discuss the makings of Nintendo's next, breakout IP.

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We already know Apple is working on a fix for a recently discovered texting bug that can render your Messages app useless (and in some cases even reboot your phone), but now there's a faster solution for anyone affected. You just need to use Siri to read your unread messages and send a dictated reply, according to a support document Apple posted yesterday. After that, you'll be able to open the Messages app once again and delete the malicious thread. The messaging bug was originally uncovered by Reddit users, and it involves sending a note with a series of Unicode characters through any iPhone messaging app. Of course, this workaround is only a fix for people who already received one of the tainted messages -- you'll have to turn off notification previews for apps if you want to stay completely safe. It's unclear when Apple will deliver an update to solve the issue, but given how easy the bug is to exploit, we figure it's coming soon.

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It's hard to believe, but that bastion of instant gratification, Facebook, has never supported GIFs (except via a kludge). But that appears to be fixed and you can now express your joy or add some comedy to posts on the social network. You just need to add a GIF link from Giphy, Imgur and other sites to your status updates, and it'll play inline like magic (uploads won't work, however, as TNW spotted). We're not sure when Zuckerberg and Co. turned the feature on, though it doesn't seem to work yet on mobile apps and may take some time to roll out to your neck of the woods. Meanwhile, here's a little inspiration.

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Far from just being that character in Pulp Fiction, GIMP is also an open-source alternative to Photoshop that's given away freely for all to use. Unfortunately, there's been a kerfuffle between the project's creators and SourceForge, one of the places that the software is available to download. The latter stands accused of adding for-profit adware to its version of GIMP, which is a big no-no amongst the free and open-source software community. In a posting to Google+, SourceForce is alleged to have frozen out GIMP for Windows rep Jernej Simončič and subsequently injecting malicious code into the build to trap unwitting users.

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We're all expecting to pay through the nose to travel between LA and SF in just 30 minutes, but the minds behind Hyperloop may have a surprise up their sleeve. Hyperloop Transportation Technologies' Dirk Ahlborn has told CNBC that he's considering a business model that apes what we see in free-to-play mobile games. The CEO is kicking around the idea that the travel itself would either be free or dirt cheap, with passengers charged for a series of as-yet undisclosed upgrades. Of course, since we're still a decade or more away from a commercial version of the system, there's plenty of time for him to change his mind.

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Mice with amnesia were able to recover training memories with assistance from blue light, in research that suggests that memories lost in brain trauma could still exist (and perhaps even be recalled) from the human brain. It marks the first time scientists were able to suppress a memory and then bring it back. The research focused on retrograde amnesia, which affects the ability to form memories after a brain injury, or recall what happened before the accident. The group trained two mice teams to remember that one room would deliver a mild electric shock when entered into. Afterwards, placing the mice in the room would cause this reaction without even delivering the shock. Researchers then identified which neurons were active in mice brains when they froze at being in the shock room. labelling those cells with a protein sensitive to blue light, and using a virus to get it where they wanted it. When blue light hit these "memory engram cells" the mouses experienced the same shock — and froze up.

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From screaming goats to Russian meteorites, YouTube has been making us unproductive since 2005. What better way to celebrate than with an artsy montage (below) featuring categories like "fails," "memes," and "animals" from YouTube's own Spotlight channel? It's set to Alpha Aerobics by Blackalicious, and will take you back to the day with Nyan Cat, Charlie the Unicorn and -- who could forget -- Kicked in the Head by a Train. Best of all, there's a full list of all 76 videos, which by my reckoning should let you blow a whole other day.

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Remember when the IRS website was hacked and around 100,000 people had their tax data stolen? Officials are now pointing accusatory fingers in the direction of Russia, at least according to CNN. The revelation was made by Illinois Representative Peter Roskam, who is believed to have gotten the information straight from IRS chief John Koskinen. Roskam added that criminal gangs used the information to file around $50 million worth of fraudulent tax refund requests, although it's not clear if any money was handed over. It's the latest in a series of high-profile digital encounters between the US and Russia, after the latter was found to have hacked the White House and accessed the President's unclassified emails. That metallic clanking sound you can hear in the background, by the way, is that of sabers being rattled.

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