Since not everybody loves going to a phone store, Sprint recently launched Direct 2 You to help you buy or update a handset from pretty much anywhere you want. It must have been on to something, as it just expanded it to four new cities: New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Denver. In addition, the service is now available to anybody, rather than just existing Sprint clients as before. Essentially, it lets you buy a new device, upgrade from an old one or get customer service from any location you want -- like your home or a ball field -- for free.

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IOC Olympics

Think of the Olympics and you'll likely remember catching some action on the BBC. The Beeb has helped televise the Games since 1948 and delivered more coverage than ever before in 2012, but from 2020, it may no longer be involved. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced today that it has struck a £922 million deal with Discovery for the rights to the 2018-2024 Summer and Winter Games, meaning Eurosport will become the default place for all things Olympics related.

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US Railway crossing accidents are up sharply over last year, but the Federal Railway Administration (FRA) is about to get some high-tech help. Google's Maps will soon include the locations of every public and private highway rail crossing location in the nation. The app will also give drivers navigating with Maps audio and visual alerts when they approach those spots. The FRA said that 270 people were killed in rail crossing accidents in 2015, 48 more than last year. They speculated that, ironically, the increase may be partly due to inattention caused by increased smartphone use on roads.

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Couple playing videogames

We know that Pavlovian conditioning can make you do all sorts of crazy things, so could it be used to make us all a bit healthier? Psychologists from the universities of Exeter and Cardiff believe that it's possible after building a "computer game" that, essentially, trains you to steer clear of bad food. Unfortunately, the game itself is just a flashcard routine where players are asked to push a button when they're shown salad and hold off when they see cookies. If we're honest, the bad guys in the food and drink industry still have the upper hand, just look at Cool Spot, the 1993 platformer that was a giant ad for 7 Up.

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Apple Worldwide Developers Conference Opens In San Francisco

When Apple first revealed iTunes Match -- the service that lets you add your own, non-Apple purchased music to iTunes -- the 25,000 song limit probably seemed huge. That was way back in 2011, however, and Apple VP Eddy Cue has revealed that when iOS 9 arrives this fall, Match will support up to 100,000 songs. Cue reminded followers that Apple Music will also get Match-like capabilities, meaning you can fill in any missing streaming music with your own tracks. Though the service will launch tomorrow with a 25,000 song limit, it too will support 100,000 songs when iOS 9 comes out.

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A small minority of enormous stars explode in a fiery supernova after they run out of fuel and collapse. Regular stars die less spectacularly, but the remnants can still be gorgeous. Case in point is NGC 6153, a nebula about 4,000 light-years from Earth. The ethereal blueish, ellipse-shaped cloud (imaged by Hubble, above) was ejected by a sun-sized star after it burned up its fuel. However, the nebula contains an unusually large amount of elements like neon and argon, and five times the nitrogen of our sun. Why? Likely because its star formed in a corner of the Milky Way with a completely different composition than our own neck of the woods.

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You can allay those fears that the fiber optic network that delivers your internet is going to overload. At UC San Diego's Qualcomm Institute, engineers not only broke the supposed limits of fiber optic data transmission — they utterly smashed it, increasing the power of optical signals almost twenty times the base level. Engineers have usually cranked up the power of the signal to send and receive data faster. However, at one point, that power increase starts to create interference, degrading whatever's getting send to the point of not delivering the data at all. As more light is beamed through cases, the amount of interference between carriers increases — at some point, the data becomes so distorted that it can't be untangled and decoded by the receiver. This time, engineers were able to send the information 7,400 miles without the need for pricey electronic regenerators to boost the signal.

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CSIRO's BioArgo robot

Believe it or not, scientists don't know a lot about how the Indian Ocean works. Without many samples, researchers are frequently left in the dark about the ways that fish, plankton and other aquatic life flourishes in the area. That won't be a challenge for much longer, though. Australia's national science agency is launching a fleet of BioArgo robots that will measure both the biological and physical traits of the ocean to learn what makes it healthy. Much like the Argo machines studying Arctic waters, they'll float deep underwater (nearly 6,600 feet) and drift with the current. They'll usually need to surface only when they're transmitting their findings. Combined with satellite imagery, the BioArgo drones should give researchers a true "3-dimensional picture" of the Indian Ocean -- important when a sixth of the human population depends on this sea for basics like food and transportation.

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Twitter on a Galaxy S6 Edge

Your favorite internet startup might not just be using Twitter for business news and sales pitches in the near future -- the US Securities and Exchange Commission has greenlit using the social network to drum up interest in future stocks and debt offerings. This only works for small outfits raising less than $50 million per year, but it should do a lot to help these young companies get funding when many venture capitalists thrive online. While this probably won't be a make-or-break matter for many companies, it shows that the SEC is aware that stuffy official filings will only get you so far in the internet era. Besides, it's fun to think that a 140-character Twitter spiel may be enough to jumpstart the next big tech firm.

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Conductive ink examples

Those dreams of having computers in your clothing might be more realistic than you think. Japanese researchers have developed a printable conductive ink that maintains a circuit even when you stretch fabric to three times its usual length -- you could have athletic gear with hidden activity trackers, sensors and other computing devices. The key is a careful mix of fluorine, an organic solvent and silver flakes which, when combined, keeps transmitting electricity even under heavy abuse.

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The Vector-APP coronagraph looking at Beta Centauri

In the hunt for planets around distant stars, the stars themselves are often the worst enemy. They're so bright that you rarely spot anything smaller than a gas giant, which isn't much help when you're trying to find habitable worlds. An alliance of American and Dutch researchers may have the ticket to locating Earth-like bodies, though. They've developed a new variety of coronagraph (a telescope filter that blocks starlight) powerful enough to give a much better view of the objects around stars, even when they're half as far from their hosts as Earth is to the Sun. The key is that it doesn't block light directly, like other coronagraphs -- it instead has the light waves cancel each other out, even in the infrared wavelengths where stars tend to blot out their orbiting companions.

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The TouchBot tests an Android phone

Yes, Google hates lag on smartphones as much as you do -- enough so that the search giant has a robot dedicated to spotting that delay between your finger input and what happens on screen. Meet the Chrome TouchBot, an OptoFidelity-made machine that gauges the touchscreen latency on Android and Chrome OS devices. As you can see in the clip below, the bot's artificial digit pokes, prods and swipes the display in a series of web-based tests (which you can try yourself) that help pinpoint problems in both code and hardware. This isn't the only gadget monitoring device lag at Google, but it could be the most important given how much the company's software revolves around touch. Don't be surprised if this automaton boosts the responsiveness of Mountain View's future platforms.

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