Australia G-20

Australia has proved that it can hold its own against Hillary Clinton any day when it comes to email gaffes. The nation's immigration department accidentally disclosed the passport numbers and other personal info of every world leader attending last year's G20 summit, then compounded the problem by hushing it up. Affected leaders include US president Barack Obama, Russia's Vladimir Putin and British prime minister David Cameron. According to an email obtained by the Guardian, "the cause of the breach was human error... (an immigration employee) failed to check that the autofill function in Microsoft Outlook had entered the correct person's detail into the email 'To' field."

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Scooters don't normally generate much buzz without some kind of gimmick -- unless they're, say, connected to a well-known company and feature a crazy business model. The all-electric Gogoro Smartscooter fits that description perfectly, as it was created by former HTC executives and relies on a network of swappable batteries. After debuting just a few months ago at CES, it will launch commercially this summer in greater Tapei following a pilot program. The centerpiece is the Gogoro Experience Center, a retail outlet that'll show off the Smartscooter EV's design and options. It'll also teach consumers about the GoStation, a removable battery vending machine that's part of the company's Gogoro Energy Network.

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If you're looking for an Apple Watch (and you're shopping old-school, brick-and-mortar style), you won't be able casually dip into an Apple store and get some new tech-laden wrist candy. Not so fast: According to training documents seen at MacRumors, there will be no walk-in sales, at least to begin with. Customers will have to make an online reservation ahead of getting to buy it, supporting rumors that there may indeed be supply concerns. Those who do make a reservation will then then get to try on a watch and have a play sometime between the April 10th pre-sale launch and the April 24th on-sale date. It won't be this way forever, though: According to the leak, Apple will likely offer walk-in sales at a later date.

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Good riddance Music Unlimited; welcome to the party, PlayStation Music. The Spotify-powered music service goes live on PlayStation devices in 41 nations starting today. As we've reported previously, this means even if you're listening to Spotify's free, ad-supported tier you can listen to your favorite playlists in-game. Whether or not your top Drake songs work as well for bounty runs in Destiny as they do for Saturday morning cleaning is another matter entirely, though. And Xbox fans? For now, there's a 40-page thread on the Spotify forums where you can make a case for the app coming to your console of choice -- alas, that's not likely to happen in the immediate future it seems.

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Want to experience exactly how much gadgets have evolved in the last 40 years? The Interface Experience at the Bard Graduate Center in New York has more than 25 seminal devices representing different computing eras, including the graphical interface grand-daddy Xerox Alto and the Macintosh Plus from 1986. Exhibit-goers will even get to try out five featured devices for themselves: a 1982 Commodore 64, the Mac Plus, a Palm Pilot circa 1997, and the original iPad and Microsoft Kinect, both from 2010. There's also a "petting zoo" wall of 100-plus cellphones across several decades that can be touched and tried out.

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Please don't jump on Cleopatra if you meet her. She isn't a real life red-shelled Koopa Troopa -- she's just wearing a 3D-printed prosthesis. See, Cleo the tortoise suffers from pyramiding, which means her shell has thick, pyramid-like growths due to poor nutrition. It also has holes and broken parts that could be injured and infected, especially since tortoises socialize and mate by climbing on top of each other. That's why Roger Henry, a student from Colorado Technical University, designed a 3D-printed shell for Cleo.

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Liquid metal art

Robots typically rely on batteries to get power, but they may soon have to do little more than nibble on another material to start moving. Chinese researchers have developed simple liquid metal machines (not shown here) that zip around if they "eat" aluminum and other substances that produce electrochemical reactions. It's not possible to directly control their movement, but they closely mimic whatever space they're in -- you can propel them through channels, for instance.

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Ready for the next installment of Halo? The bad news is you still have a seven-month wait on your hands, but at least it's a concrete release date, right? Right? The news coincides with a new in-game teaser for Halo 5, with Master Chief et al. attempting to emote again --still while cocooned in giant spacesuit helmets. Hashtags have been readied, as have faux docu-diary tumblr blogs. But you'd probably like to see that trailer before diving down that particular rabbit hole; it's right after the break.

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There's a familiar theme whenever Engadget reviews a Sony smartphone, which is that the hardware's great, but not compelling enough to make you buy one. When Sharif Sakr got his hands on the Xperia Z1, he found that the headline feature -- that 20 megapixel camera -- wasn't strong enough to compete with the Lumia 1020. That said, we imagine that some of you did splash out on this handset, so why not come to Engadget's product forums and spill your brains as to what you liked, and hated, about the Z1?

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Dmitry Morozov's GBG-8 Game Boy camera gun

If you had a spare Game Boy Camera and the printer to match, what would you do with them? If you're media artist Dmitry Morozov, you'd make a one-of-a-kind firearm. His GBG-8 gun uses Nintendo's photographic peripherals and an Arduino board to shoot photos (almost literally) and print them on the spot -- effectively, it's a low-resolution Polaroid cam with a trigger. We can't imagine that this would go down well with security officials, but it could be a blast if you want to capture 8-bit memories with more flair than the original Game Boy gear allows. Let's just hope that Morozov offers some instructions so that his picture pistol is easy to reproduce at home.

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