If you'd rather that your non-game Oculus Rift experiences be nonfiction, it looks like that wish is coming your way rather soon. Next week, Zero Point hits Steam and it offers full 360 degree views of a Department of Defense military training camp, a beach scene and even the extremely crowded LA Convention Center during E3 2013. The rub of the video is that it's the first of its kind -- a documentary about virtual reality, filmed in VR and made for the platform. It's very meta. Each scene is explorable, with either head tracking, a game controller or a mouse running the action. It's apparently compatible with all past-and-future Oculus dev kits, and will cost $15 come its October 28th release. However, IGN notes that if you purchase before November 4th it'll only run you $12. Want a preview before you buy? Of course you do; just head past the break for that.

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Microsoft Lumia logo

Over a year after the acquisition was first announced, Microsoft is officially replacing the Nokia Lumia brand. In a blog post today, the software giant revealed its upcoming smartphones will now be known as Microsoft Lumia. The new Microsoft branding will appear on future phones from the company, with a plain black version of the company's four-squared logo also set to make an appearance.

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Online radio streaming app iHeartRadio has just made good on its promise to add support for CarPlay, Apple's new car infotainment system. But, it's not the only app joining Spotify on CarPlay today -- Rdio, a free music streaming service with offline playback, is tagging along. By introducing optimized apps for Cupertino's car platform, both online services make it easier for users to navigate their interfaces on an onboard screen. Sadly, there are very few people who can actually enjoy the updates right now, as CarPlay's only available on Ferrari FFs and select Pioneer in-dash systems, though most automakers promise to load it on their vehicles' entertainment systems in the future. Other web services also vow to eventually introduce optimized apps for the platform, including CBS News Radio and, of course, Beats Music.

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Loyal Honda fans, crisis averted. You don't have to switch to Subaru, Volvo or Ford if you want their anti-collision technology, now that the Japanese automaker has officially announced its own. The company has just launched a new and enhanced driver-assistive system called "Sensing," which, true to its name, can sense vehicles and pedestrians that might be blocking your way. Using a radar hidden in the front grille coupled with a camera on the windshield, the system can detect whether you're in danger of colliding with another vehicle or a person crossing the street. It then gives you both audio and visual warnings if so, gently applies the break if you still haven't after a while, and then brakes hard in your stead if you're thisclose to running somebody over or smashing against another car.

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The internet's been blamed for making a lot of things redundant, and you'd be justified in assuming that that extended to America's Funniest Home Videos too. Except, surprisingly, the wealth of cat videos and stripper-pole-fail clips online hasn't had a fatal effect on the long-running show, according to Bloomberg. How the series has managed to survive is apparently been by embracing the internet and creating a trio of YouTube channels, a Facebook page that, according to AFV's Vin Di Bona, gets an average 5,000 to 10,000 shares per post and a partnership with online video giant Maker Studios. Di Bona also says that the wealth of AFV digital content is driving viewers back to its traditional broadcasts too.

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In this Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, photo, Chet Kanojia, founder and CEO of Aereo, Inc., stands next to a server array of antennas as he holds an antenna between his fingers, in New York.  Aereo is one of several startups created to deliver traditional media over the Internet without licensing agreements. Past efforts have typically been rejected by courts as copyright violations. In Aereo’s case, the judge accepted the company’s legal reasoning, but with reluctance. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Aereo can no longer relay TV shows to its customers using its teeny-tiny antennas (for now, that is), according to US District Judge Alison Nathan. It's been a while since the Supreme Court decided that the service violates the law by "transmitting performances of copyrighted work to the public," but it's only now that a judge has issued a temporary ban order. For those who've forgotten what it is: Aereo used to stream live or nearly-live programming to its subscribers' phones, laptops or tablets for $8 a month. Each customer is assigned a minuscule antenna of his own (pictured above), which captures shows from the airwaves, as well as a DVR that stores recordings for a later time. Now, though, it's no longer allowed to beam on-air TV shows to people's devices anymore. Even worse, Judge Nathan has refused to acknowledge it as a cable service, which means it can't reinvent itself as one -- even if it's now willing to pay those licensing fees.

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Does the topic of laser guns intrigue you? Perhaps you're more interested to learn about Facebook's new anonymous chat app? Read on for all our news highlights from the last 24 hours, including Google's Android Wear update, CERN's mysterious photos, our very own gamer's shopping list, and more.

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LG has been trying for years to catch up to Samsung and Apple in phone sales, and its next step on that path is to make a device with an LG CPU inside. The G3 Screen phone that it's releasing this week in Korea will have an eight-core "NUCLUN" (pronounced NOO-klun) processor, based off of an ARM big.LITTLE design similar to Samsung's octacore Exynos chips. NUCLUN has four 1.5GHz cores for the tough tasks, and four 1.2GHz cores for easier stuff that help it save on battery life. Otherwise, there's also a 5.9-inch 1080p screen and support for the new, faster LTE-A networks that download at up to 225Mbps. Until now, LG's phones have mostly relied on Qualcomm chips for their processing needs, but Dr. Jong-seok Park believes going its own way will help the company "achieve better vertical integration" and greater flexibility going forward. Of course, we're wondering when a NUCLUN-powered phone will go on sale outside of Korea, but considering the progression of Exynos, that could take a while.

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The early '90s were a simpler time: Mullets were acceptable, everyone was wearing Zubaz pants and rocking your dad's flannel didn't make you a hipster. In an effort to bring us back to the era when grunge ruled the earth, the folks at formerly-defunct 3D Realms has bundled 32 of its classic games into one package and is selling 'em DRM-free over at its website. What's in the collection of almost everything the company produced? A killaton of games (and a remastered soundtrack, apparently), that's what; including, but not limited to: Duke Nukem 3D, Commander Keen: Goodbye Galaxy, Wolfenstein 3D and Wacky Wheels. The anthology will set you back $40, but if you act within the next two days you can get it for half of that. There's a video after the break if you need a refresher course on who the company is, too. 3D Realms also promises that in the coming months it'll have much more to talk about including its in-development games. Come get some, indeed.

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If you were thinking of milking Bitcasa's unlimited cloud storage for all it's worth, you'd better have an alternative lined up. The company is dropping its signature Infinite storage option after November 15th, in tandem with an upgrade to new infrastructure. You'll have to migrate to a limited tier (such as the new 10TB, $999 per year Pro plan) if you want to keep all your content. Why the sudden clampdown? According to Bitcasa, you probably weren't using it -- only 0.1 percent of its accounts chew through more than 10TB. Moreover, some of those that are consuming that much space are reportedly abusing it at a level which "seems impossible" for any one person. The company hasn't elaborated on what these nogoodniks are doing beyond violating the terms of service, but it's easy to see a company trying to use Bitcasa as a makeshift storage server.

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