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The history of computing, cars from the New York Auto Show and other stories you might've missed!

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Find out what forty years of personal computing history looks like as we visit The Interface Experience, an exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center's Focus Gallery in New York. Meanwhile, the New York International Auto show was going on this week and there were some very beautiful cars to check out. Catch up on all of these stories and more in the weekly roundup.

Relive the history of computing at 'The Interface Experience'

At a time when devices are faster and slimmer than ever, a collection of bulky old computers can be amusing yet surprisingly evocative. The Interface Experience, an exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center's Focus Gallery in New York, brings on a rush of nostalgia with a ton of vintage machines. Kimon Keramidas, curator and director of the digital media lab, hopes that an interaction with aging technology will make people think critically about their current devices. Unlike the objects that are off-limits behind a glass wall in a museum, the machines at the exhibit are open and quite alive. They've been overhauled with custom programs to initiate a three-way exchange with the user, the software and the hardware.

The most beautiful cars at the New York Auto Show

There are a lot of vehicles at the New York International Auto Show, naturally. This year, though, the prominent theme for carmakers, both from the US and abroad, seemed to be bright colors and concept projects. And that is, after all, what auto shows are essentially about. From the new Honda Civic to the Audi A8-esque Lincoln Continental, there's no doubt that manufacturers aren't afraid to push the envelope and, in the case of the latter, even borrow some design elements from top-tier competitors. One thing is for sure, however: Many of the rides at the event don't need Xzibit to show up and make them stand out. So, with that in mind, here are some of the best and most impressive cars from the 2015 New York Auto Show.

MacBook review: Apple reinvents the laptop again

For months, the internet was abuzz with two similar, and somewhat contradictory, Apple rumors. Depending on whom you believed, the famously secretive company was working on either a 12-inch "iPad Pro" or a Retina display MacBook Air. To date, neither of these products has materialized, but there's reason to believe that both rumors were actually pointing toward the new 12-inch MacBook. The laptop, which goes on sale tomorrow, is in many ways a traditional notebook, with an Intel processor, OS X and a unibody aluminum enclosure similar to what you'll find on the MacBook Air and Pro.

High-tech TV: How realistic is the hacking in prime-time shows?

A group of five impeccably dressed high school girls are almost murdered dozens of times by the same, mysterious stalker and the police in their idyllic small town are either corrupt or too incompetent to care. How do the girls fight back? Hacking, of course. At least, that's one way they do it on Pretty Little Liars. "Hacking" is the deus ex machina in plenty of scenarios on Pretty Little Liars and other mainstream programs, allowing people to easily track, harass, defend and stalk each other 30 to 60 minutes at a time.

Snowden shows John Oliver how the NSA can see your dick pics

In a surprise interview with Edward Snowden, John Oliver made NSA spying revelations more relatable to the American public through the topic of dick pics. The HBO comedian, who gives his satire a sharp bite via exhaustive research, traveled to Moscow for a sit-down with the infamous whistleblower. Oliver wasn't joking around at first when he called a Snowden leak that put al-Qaida intelligence at risk "a fuck up." He added, "You have to own that. ... You're giving documents with information you know could be harmful." After an awkward pause, Snowden said, "In journalism, we have to accept that some mistakes will be made."

Engadget's new buyer's guide picks: the MacBook Pro, Moto E and more!

It's been one busy month for reviews: Engadget has published seven in the past four weeks alone. That means we've got quite a few additions to our various buyer's guides. First up: the HTC One M9. No, we don't like the camera quite as much as the UltraPixel shooter on last year's M8, but on the whole, the M9 is still among the best Android handsets you can buy right now. We've also made a nod to the new and improved Moto E, which remains one of the best budget phones on the market. Meanwhile, we have not one, but several new favorite laptops.

DJI's Phantom 3 brings 4K recording to its most popular drone

DJI's Phantom series of read-to-fly quadcopters have been instrumental in bringing drones into mainstream consciousness. Particularly the Phantom 2 Vision+, which made silky-smooth aerial video possible for have-a-go pilots right out of the box (most other methods involve a fair amount of assembly). Today, the Phantom family grows again with two new members: the Phantom 3 Professional and the Phantom 3 Advanced. So what's new? And, more importantly, which one do you want?

Despite its looks, this 3D printed violin (probably) won't kill you

It might not be a Stradivarius, but the violin you see above is pretty impressive on its own merits. For starters, it's 3D printed and only has two strings. And that's to say nothing of its appearance; this thing looks like it'd be right at home on The Citadel in Mass Effect. The Piezoelectric Violin (as it's officially called), was concepted by a pair of architects who tell BBC that the impetus for its creation was realizing that the challenges of their day jobs aren't all that different from those faced by composers and musicians. It's still playable by "anyone" too, despite its wild looks.

What it's like to shop for an Apple Watch

The Apple Watch is unlike any product the Cupertino company has released before. To succeed, it needs to appeal as both a useful gadget and a luxury timepiece that people want to wear on their wrists. With this in mind, Apple has chosen to display its debut wearable in more than just the retail meccas where it normally sells its iPhones, iPads, iMacs and MacBooks. It's also built special "shops-within-shops" inside a trio of high-end department stores in Tokyo, London and Paris. We visited the one in England, which resides inside the famous Selfridges department store on Oxford Street.

The man who left behind $78 million to revamp a classic space shooter

Eric Peterson has dedicated 20 years of his life to the video game industry, handling development and production in startups and large studios alike. He has a passion for space games, and in April 2012, he helped found Cloud Imperium Games, the studio building Chris Roberts' massive interstellar simulator Star Citizen. Cloud Imperium has since raised $78.6 million from nearly 900,000 dedicated fans, with more adding to the pot every day; it's the largest and most ridiculous crowdfunding campaign in gaming history.

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