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After Math: Break them up

The calls for regulation are coming from inside the campus.
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It's been another week of gaffes from the tech industry's marquee companies -- but then again, when aren't firms living the "move fast, break stuff" credo not shooting themselves in the foot? Google is in antitrust trouble with Indian authorities, Amazon is in hot water with the FTC over child privacy, and even Facebook's co-founder thinks Zuckerberg has strayed too far into Elliot Carver territory.

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Riot Games staff walk out after sexism lawsuits result in forced arbitration

Riot Games' staff took a break from the gaming industry's famously tight production deadlines this week to protest one of their employer's other inhuman policies: forced arbitration in sexual discrimination cases.

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The end of Works With Nest could be trouble for smart homes

So, about all those Nest products you bought. Google announced this week that it's abandoning its Works with Nest program this summer in favor of a more tightly controlled Works with Google Assistant system. The changeover will "break IFTTT" outright, according to a Google representative.

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India reportedly opens Android antitrust investigation

Remember that EU lawsuit against Google, alleging that the company leveraged Android's dominance in the market to shut out potential competitors? The one that resulted in a $5 billion fine? India is now looking to get in on that action, with its Competition Commission bringing a suspiciously similar lawsuit against the company this week.

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FTC complaint alleges Amazon's Echo Dot Kids violates child privacy law

And let's not forget Amazon's newest legal troubles. A group of privacy and child-safety advocates leveled an FTC complaint against the online retailer this week, accusing its Echo Dot Kids smart speaker retaining audio recordings and data, even after being "deleted" from the device.

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A ransomware attack is holding Baltimore's networks hostage

Just in case recently resigned Mayor Catherine Pugh hasn't broken Baltimore City Hall badly enough with her self-published children's book scandal, the city government was beset this week by a broadly effective ransomware attack. The digital hijackers have demanded 13 Bitcoins (about $76,280) to release the city's file system.

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Facebook co-founder urges FTC to break up the company

You know you've strayed into "power-mad media mogul" territory when even your company's co-founder is calling for Facebook to be broken up and strictly regulated. This week, Chris Hughes (shown above wearing shoes like a normal human) penned a New York Times op-ed calling for government intervention on Zuckerberg's "unchecked power."

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Uber and Lyft drivers are striking over pay and job security

Uber held its IPO on Friday, all but guaranteeing that its investors will be significantly richer come the start of next week. Its drivers? Not so much.

In this article: column, opinion, tomorrow
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