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Lenovo Mirage Solo

Lenovo Mirage Solo

from  $399.99+
Lenovo Mirage Solo Review

Lenovo Mirage Solo Review

Posted   05.04.18
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78 Engadget Score
A good product that falls short of greatness.
78

A good product that falls short of greatness.

How we score

The Engadget Score is a unique ranking of products based on extensive independent research and analysis by our expert editorial and research teams. The Global Score is arrived at only after curating hundreds, sometimes thousands of weighted data points (such as critic and user reviews).

Engadget Review

Lenovo’s Mirage Solo is a new kind of self-contained VR headset, and despite some quirks it gets a lot right out of the gate. The addition of WorldSense motion tracking and some clever internal design touches make the Mirage a more powerful, more flexible option than alternatives like the Oculus Go. The strength of the first batch of WorldSense-compatible apps leaves us cautiously optimistic, too. The thing is, at $400 the Mirage Solo costs far more than entry-level headsets and about the same as higher-end tethered options like the Oculus Rift. With the Mirage, Lenovo and Google charted a new path, but it’s not clear right now who this is for.

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Pros
  • Comfortable design
  • WorldSense tracking works well
  • Solid performance
Cons
  • Pricey compared to other headsets
  • Relatively small app catalog
  • Not very portable
78 Engadget Score
A good product that falls short of greatness.
78

A good product that falls short of greatness.

How we score

The Engadget Score is a unique ranking of products based on extensive independent research and analysis by our expert editorial and research teams. The Global Score is arrived at only after curating hundreds, sometimes thousands of weighted data points (such as critic and user reviews).

Scores

Engadget

78
 

Users

Not yet scored
 

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Score Breakdown

 
73
Average Critic Score
 
80
Tom's Guide
The Lenovo Mirage Solo with Daydream delivers a true stand-alone virtual-reality experience with the ability to move around, but it has some drawbacks.
 
80
TechRadar
Impressive by both mobile and tethered standards, Lenovo’s new model has the potential to raise the quality of interactive VR and to take the medium a step further.
 
70
SlashGear
Of the mobile virtual reality headsets I’ve tried, the Mirage Solo is certainly the most engaging. 6DoF, no matter how rare right now, is a huge advantage. Nonetheless, I couldn’t blame you for holding out until there are more VR titles that take advantage of WorldSense. Lenovo’s standalone Daydream checks off the convenience boxes for mobile VR; now it needs the software to catch up.
 
60
Android Central
At $399, this headset is double the cost of the Oculus Go. While the Mirage is certainly more technically capable with its WorldSense features, apps load a little faster and the display is a touch nicer, the experience is not $200 better than what Oculus is offering. Price being one of the big things keeping people from buying more advanced headsets in the desktop-class, this headset is not ready to wow people right now.
 
70
9to5Google
The Mirage Solo is a great product for people who are a fan of VR, but if you’re like me and it’s just a casual thing you’ll only end up doing once in a blue moon, it’s probably not worth your time. As the culmination of Google’s Daydream project, though, the Mirage Solo holds a special spot in the VR world, and it’s something that’s going to set a baseline for future experiences, and set the stage for the next generation of Daydream development.
 
70
Wareable
The Lenovo Mirage Solo cuts the cord in most of the right ways. It’s so easy to just slip on and use, you can’t help wonder why all VR can’t be such a joy. But it’s also as expensive as a Rift headset (sans PC), with a smaller pool of games and more limited input. If you don’t own the PC to support a higher-end headset and just want something you can pick up off the coffee table every so often, this does the trick. Otherwise you're probably better off waiting; standalone VR is only just getting started.
 
70
Gizmodo
I really wish this thing was cheaper, because standalone VR headset was supposed to be the dream. But the Mirage Solo isn’t quite there yet.
 
90
PC World
Its ease of setup, wireless experience, and Chromecast capability make the standalone VR system to beat today.
 
80
TechCrunch
Compared to the standalone headsets that have come before it, the Lenovo Mirage is a steal at $399, but with the $199 Oculus Go launching this week as well, I have a tough time recommending the Mirage over the Go. Oculus has invested so much more time into its core apps than Google has, and while the WorldSense positional tracking is exceptionally impressive from a tech perspective, without tracked controllers the experience for the end consumer is only improved a bit.
 
70
CNET
Google's first self-contained VR headset is one step toward making mobile VR better, but it's not the complete package.

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