The Buyer's Guide

Find it, buy it and tell us how you really feel.

78
Global
Score
A good product that falls short of greatness.
78

A good product that falls short of greatness.

How we score

The Engadget Score is a unique ranking of products based on extensive independent research and analysis by our expert editorial and research teams. The Global Score is arrived at only after curating hundreds, sometimes thousands of weighted data points (such as critic and user reviews).

Engadget Review

Pros
  • Compact and extremely solid build Great quality 7-inch, capacitive touchscreen Two cameras
Cons
  • Not all apps scale to the screenLittle support from GoogleNo decent video calling software
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Scores

Engadget

Not yet scored
 

User Reviews

100
jerresand
A gadget unicorn - Engadget
90
korbendalis
The best in its category. We highly recommend it. - Engadget
90
ChazClout
I recently bought this as an upgrade to Dells 5 inch tablet, the Streak. Although...read more
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Score Breakdown

 
68
Average user Score

Storage capacity

83
 

Features

78
 

Durability

83
 

Ease of use

76
 

Portability (size / weight)

85
 

Battery life

70
 

Design and form factor

79
 

Display

82
 
 
100
jerresand
A gadget unicorn - Engadget
 
90
korbendalis
The best in its category. We highly recommend it. - Engadget
 
90
ChazClout
I recently bought this as an upgrade to Dells 5 inch tablet, the Streak. Although an excellent little device, the Streak didn't differentiate itself enough and seemed to me to be simply a large phone. Wanting more, I checked out the recent Android tablet releases and eventually chose the Galaxy Tab after seeing the performance of my wife's Galaxy-S phone compared to my Nexus One. The Tab has some great features and is a great size when it comes to partability and connectivity. 3D gaming performance is stellar, the camera is good enough and music + video playback are perfect. Another feature I've already found a use for the mobile hotspot feature when our home broadband went down recently. Android application compatibility is good although it initially didn't run some apps full screen until I used the "spare parts" compatibility fix posted on jkkmobile. This is definitely worth considering if someone wants an Android based tablet or simple a smaller tablet that is more portable than the iPad, the Archos 10.1 or the Advent Vega.
 
90
chefbenito
This is my wife's primary tablet, secondary to her Laptop and her Android 3g Froyo Phone. She loves it, I also love it. Lots of apps in android marketplace, Froyo may not be "ideal" or "perfect" for a tablet, but is plenty powerful and speedy and supports new hardware. All in a all I am very happy with this tablet and would recommend it. It is not as gorgeous as my iPad, but it probably can do a bit more. Cameras, expandable memory, Flash 10.2, GPS, Google Voice Search, Smaller for better battery life all are exceptional features for this sub 300 dollar tablet. BTW- Purchased w Tmobile 3G data plan, in CT. 3G so good so far, wifi works like a dream. A bit better wifi range than my ipad. Nice device to have.
 
90
JediChric
The best in its category. We highly recommend it. - Engadget
 
90
keyl10
The best in its category. We highly recommend it. - Engadget
 
60
ayejay85
This was my first Android device. Probably won't be the last, but it left a bitter taste in my mouth. I ended up returning the Tab after a few weeks with it. The problems were numerous. 1.) This is the most egregious. The Galaxy Tab Wi-Fi is dramatically lower spec'd than its 3G counterparts. Therefore, every review you can find online does not apply. It has an older generation processor (Arm v7 vs. Arm v8), the graphics processor is also a generation behind and dramatically lower in speed (530 vs. the 540). What does this mean to non tech geeks? The buttery smooth performance you see in reviews for the earlier Tabs is replaced by slow scrolling in webpages, the homescreen taking several seconds to work when you rotate the device, and games simply not working. I couldn't believe Samsung would completely cripple the device like this but a casual glance at the product page produces this gem "features and specifications subject to change without prior notification". It is absolutely insane a major tech company has that disclaimer on a product page, and the fact they don't advertise the radical difference between the devices is shameful. 2.) Another major consequence is one of the coolest features of the 3G Tabs is not present here, HDMI out. HDMI out does not work on the Wi-Fi only version. Probably a result of Sammy putting the Wi-Fi only Tab a generation behind the 3G version. 3.) Finally, this really cemented my decision to return it. I can handle the inferior performance, grudgingly, but I can take it. I can't handle the fact that this device is Wi-Fi only and it doesn't properly connect to Wi-Fi. When I first got the device I had trouble connecting it to networks. After resetting it like 5 times and assigning a static IP address to it, it finally randomly worked. Then, after a couple of weeks and no change on my part I got the same connection problems! Now, after a few more resets, I finally had it. Less you think its just me, google Galaxy Tab Wi-Fi problems and marvel at how widespread they are. Simply put, Samsung is launching new tablets next month (June 8th), and they've clearly given up on the current Tab despite it launching only a couple of weeks ago. Save your money and wait, I promise you this device will only bring frustration.
 
80
vorontheraven
There's a lot to like about this in spite of a few flaws. - Engadget
 
90
KevinCTofel
Excerpt from one of my many blog posts on this device: The Best Tablet Is the One You Have With You The Tab is roughly the same size as, but thicker than Amazon’s Kindle, which ironically I sold when I got my iPad. Prior to iPad ownership, my Kindle would go everywhere with me because of its small size, light weight, stellar battery life and integrated connectivity. And I do mean everywhere: the device would fit in my jacket pocket or could be thrown — figuratively, not literally — in the car or in a gear bag. The Galaxy Tab offers me that same level of portability, while the iPad doesn’t. Here’s a perfect example: I purchased the Tab on a weekend at the local T-Mobile store and my family wanted to hit the mall afterwards. I either carried the device in hand or placed it in my back jeans pocket while cruising the mall for hours. As my wife or daughter stopped to browse for clothes, I quickly whipped out the small tablet to manage email, web-surf, and watch YouTube videos. I wouldn’t have been able to do that with the iPad for one simple reason: the iPad wouldn’t have come with me on a trip to the mall in the first place. If you look at the Tab and compare the screen size to the iPad, it’s easy to think there’s little difference between the two: one has a 7-inch display and one has a 9.7-inch display, right? But in actuality, the Galaxy Tab is half the size of an iPad, making it far easier to tote around and use while standing or walking. As an aside: the difference in icon size is negligible and icons on my iPod touch are actually smaller than those of the Tab, so Apple’s “sandpaper down your fingers” to use a 7-inch tablet argument is a fallacy in my opinion. Compromises Must Be Made The iPad surely wins out on the breadth of application choices, media content availability and overall polish of the user interface. But it’s difficult to quantify that advantage. Is the iPad twice as good as the Tab or is it just a little better? Obviously, the answer will vary for each person, but after a month with the Tab, I find that what it lacks in functionality or ease-of-use is more than offset by the portability for me. And in some cases, the Tab has more functionality than the current iPad; it acts as a mobile hotspot to share the 3G data connection and can accept the microSD card filled with music from my smartphone, for example. For my needs, both devices work perfectly fine for email, web surfing, occasional gaming, using social networks and other bite-sized activities that don’t require a full-blown desktop operating system. Yes, there are more apps for iOS and even when an app is available on both platforms, I often like the iOS version slightly more than its Android equivalent. But to think the Tab is unusable as compared to an iOS device is overstating the difference. I’m willing to give up a smidge of usability or a wider array of software to gain the ability to easily use the device everywhere I go. It’s this very concept that makes the smartphone so enabling, regardless of make, model or platform: the ability to be connected everywhere is what’s driving the mobile revolution forward. In fact, I’m actually using my Android smartphone less as well. The Tab does all of the same things as my Nexus One, but on a larger, higher-resolution screen, making for a better overall experience.
 
80
fourblades
Though this is just a magnified version of the Galaxy phones, it's nice to see some of the native apps are designed with a bigger screen in mind. Feels nice to hold since it's as big as a DVD case and can be held with one hand.