ChromeOS

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  • Gemini for ChromeOS

    Google is bringing a slew of AI-powered software features to Chromebook Plus laptops

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    18 hours ago

    Google has a host of new AI-powered features coming to its Chromebook Plus models.

  • Acer Chromebook Plus Spin 714

    Acer, ASUS and HP all have new Chromebook Plus laptops with Google's built-in AI features

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    18 hours ago

    Google announced a host of new AI features for Chromebooks, and Acer, ASUS and HP have new models to showcase them.

  • Acer Chromebook Plus 514 (2024)

    Acer's new $399 Chromebook Plus 514 hits the mark for a solid budget laptop

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    04.18.2024

    Acer's latest Chromebook Plus 514 sounds like it hits the sweet spot of price and performance.

  • Seth Erdman, center, and his fellow students use Chromebooks while working on a lesson in a third grade class on Friday, Jan. 16, 2015, at Walden Elementary School in Deerfield, Ill. (Anthony Souffle/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)

    Google's new Classroom tools include a 'reader mode' for people with dyslexia

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    03.28.2023

    Reader mode is but one of the new features and updates Google has rolled out for education users.

  • The iPhone 14 held in mid-air in front of some trees with the iOS home page facing out.

    How to take a screenshot on any device

    by 
    Jeff Dunn
    Jeff Dunn
    12.28.2022

    We’ve put together a comprehensive guide to taking a screenshot on the most popular phone, tablet, PC and gaming platforms, from iOS and macOS to Windows and Android.

  • Photos of Framework's first modular and repairable Chromebook.
    84100
    84100

    Hear me out: The modular Framework Chromebook is worth the $1,000 (for some)

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    12.12.2022

    It’s been a little over a year since the first Framework laptops launched, and now the company has a new model, the Framework Laptop Chromebook Edition. It offers the same benefits as its Windows sibling – namely, solid industrial design and specs coupled with the promise of customization and future expandability. That said, it’s also one of the more expensive Chromebooks available, starting at $999. That’s a lot of money for a Chromebook – but if it can last you five years or more, it might be worth the cost.

  • Valve Steam Deck

    Xbox Cloud Gaming gets a resolution boost on Steam Deck and ChromeOS

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    11.04.2022

    ChromeOS and Linux users (including those with a Steam Deck) should now be able to play Xbox Cloud Gaming titles at higher resolutions.

  • Steam and Portal 2 running on ChromeOS

    Steam for ChromeOS works on more devices and is easier to install

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    11.03.2022

    Google and Valve have announced that Steam for ChromeOS has graduated to beta. The software now works on more devices, has better hardware support and includes a number of usability fixes.

  • The HP Elite Dragonfly Chromebook seen on a wooden tabletop in a coffee shop.

    HP Elite Dragonfly Chromebook review: The best of ChromeOS, but not worth the price

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    10.31.2022

    Google has been making high-end Chromebooks for almost a decade now, dating back to the $1,300 Chromebook Pixel in 2013. At the time, many people saw it as a beautiful but strange device. In the years that followed, both Google and its hardware partners have made premium Chromebooks more and more commonplace. Though, a still-unconfirmed report earlier this year suggests Google is giving up on making laptop hardware, at least for now. The company hasn’t said anything of the sort yet, but the reality is that Google hasn’t made a new Chromebook since the Pixelbook Go in late 2019. Of course, that hasn’t stopped other manufacturers from making Chromebooks with gorgeous screens, great industrial design and powerful hardware. But HP’s Elite Dragonfly Chromebook, released earlier this year, might be the nicest I’ve used in a long time. It also has a jaw-dropping price point, starting at well over $1,000. Much like the original Chromebook Pixel, HP’s latest is a joy to use that is very hard to recommend because of that price.

  • The Acer Chromeboko 516 GE  laptop seen open, facing the camera on a wooden desktop with a blue wall in the background.

    Acer’s cloud gaming Chromebook is a solid laptop, even if you don’t game

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    10.14.2022

    Earlier this week, Google and hardware partners ASUS, Acer and Lenovo announced a somewhat surprising initiative to build Chromebooks expressly for cloud gaming. While many Chromebooks are a riff on the classic 13-inch laptop, the first round of these devices have large, high-resolution screens with fast refresh rates, anti-ghosting keyboards, powerful processors and a few software tweaks to better work with cloud gaming services like GeForce NOW. All these laptops are set to be released by the end of October, but I got a chance to check out a pre-production version of Acer’s Chromebook 516 GE. Over the last week, I’ve played some games with it as well as put it through my daily work routine. I’ll need to test the final version before giving it a proper review, but the Chromebook 516 GE has a lot going for it, whether you play games or not.

  • Google cloud gaming Chromebooks

    Google is trying to make Chromebooks built for cloud gaming

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    10.11.2022

    One part of Google may have given up on cloud gaming, with Stadia set to be discontinued in a few months. But on the ChromeOS team, there’s a whole new initiative to try and push back on the whole “you can’t game on a Chromebook” thing. Today, Google — along with a handful of hardware and software partners — are announcing what it calls “the world’s first laptops built for cloud gaming.”

  • UKRAINE - 2021/11/30: In this photo illustration, Google Play Games logo is seen displayed on a smartphone in a hand. (Photo Illustration by Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

    Google Play Games are coming to Windows PCs in 2022

    by 
    Andrew Tarantola
    Andrew Tarantola
    12.09.2021

    Google executives announced on stage at the 2021 Game Awards that, come 2022, the app service will be available on Windows PCs in addition to Android and ChromeOS.

  • Select-to-speak

    Chrome OS adds more natural voices for 'Select-to-speak' accessibility feature

    by 
    Igor Bonifacic
    Igor Bonifacic
    10.14.2021

    With today’s update, more natural voices are available in 25 languages and various accents, with more to come.

  • Google Pixelbook Go

    The latest Chrome OS update improves accessibility on Chromebooks

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    10.13.2020

    There are more cursor colors and Google improved the text-to-speech features.

  • GeForce Now

    NVIDIA brings GeForce Now game streaming to Chromebooks

    by 
    Nick Summers
    Nick Summers
    08.18.2020

    NVIDIA is launching a beta version of its GeForce Now game streaming service on ChromeOS today. Instead, you can simply point your browser to play.geforce.now and login with a new or existing GeForce Now account. GeForce Now supports a range of titles from digital storefronts like Steam, Epic Games Store and Ubisoft’s Uplay.

  • Asus Chromebook Flip A436

    Google is making it easier to create apps using Chromebooks

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    08.12.2020

    ChromeOS.dev has resources for web, Android and Linux development.

  • Lenovo

    Google reveals its timeline for killing off Chrome apps

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    01.15.2020

    Chrome apps have been on death row since Google announced in 2016 it would wind down support. Almost four years later, the company has finalized its timeline for phasing them out across Windows, Mac Linux and Chrome OS.

  • Gokhan Balci/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

    Chrome now supports your PC's media keys

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    03.12.2019

    Chrome is finally ready to make use of your keyboard's media buttons. Google has released the polished version of Chrome 73, and its centerpiece is support for the media keys on many newer PC keyboards. You'll need a Mac, Windows or Chrome OS system (Linux is coming later), but this will let you pause a web video even when the browser is in the background. We could see this causing problems if you regularly leave a media app open, but it could be immensely valuable if you treat YouTube like a jukebox or just have to dash off in a hurry.

  • Google

    Chromebook App Hub gives teachers ideas for class activities

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    03.04.2019

    Many schools use Chromebooks, but they might not always know how to make the most of those systems in the classroom -- and Google knows it. The firm is launching a Chromebook App Hub that will both help teachers find activity ideas and connect institutions with developers that might fit their needs. Educators can both create and look for "idea sparks" and apps based on the age range, subject, idea category and even specific learning goals.

  • ASUS

    Chrome OS update expands Google Assistant and Android Pie support

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    02.09.2019

    Google has moved the latest version of its Chrome OS from beta to release status, and with the arrival of version 72 there are changes you'll notice -- if you're using the right kind of device. One of the biggest adjustments is its native integration of Google Assistant (and Android 9 Pie) that brings it to more Chromebooks. Similar to Android, there's a pill-shaped bar at the center of the screen that can expand for users to type into, or access via voice controls. If you're using Chrome OS on some convertible tablet-style hardware like the Pixel Slate, you'll probably appreciate updates to the Chrome browser that make it easier to control with the touchscreen while in tablet mode. 9to5Google notes there's also a now on-by-default picture-in-picture mode for videos playing in the browser, as well as tweaks to menus for its Cast feature and Settings. On the security front, Chrome OS 72 sandboxes its "Shill" network manager to prevent exploits like this one uncovered in 2016, and it delivers the USBGuard feature that secures down access to its ports when the device is locked. That helps prevent attacks using "Rubber Ducky" USB devices that plug in and pretend to be a keyboard to execute commands when your computer should be safely asleep. As usual, Chrome OS hardware should grab the update automatically over the next few days.