DivX

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  • Yamada stuffs seven-inch LCD into HTV-200XU boombox

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    04.22.2007

    Cramming Bluetooth, iPod capabilities, or even entirely too many speakers into a boombox are all fair game, but Yamada's latest rendition manages to include a seven-inch LCD for an all-in-one home threatre for the studio apartment set. Sure, we've seen LCDs big and small within sound systems before, but this media-centric conglomerate actually takes the video side of its duties quite seriously; you'll find support for DVB-T, DivX, DVDs, and MPEG4 movie files, while it even provides for a 5.1 output to cap off the "theater going experience." Additionally, the system purportedly hooks up to your TV if the built-in screen begins to hurt your retinas, rips your CDs, and also plays nice with MP3s, JPEGs, and FM radio when your video collection runs dry. The system itself reportedly packs 30-watts of RMS power, connects to your PC via USB, and will set you back around €220 ($300).[Via CNET]

  • Engadget Podcast 106 - 04.13.2007

    by 
    Trent Wolbe
    Trent Wolbe
    04.13.2007

    Finally, some answers! Yes, Sony is killing the 20GB PS3. Yes, Xbox 360 will get a QWERTY keyboard device. Yes, Leopard is actually delayed. Yes, Palm is developing its own mobile Linux OS. And yes, we're definitely still holding the 2006 Engadget Awards. All this and more on Engadget Podcast 106, enjoy! Get the podcast [iTunes] Subscribe to the Podcast directly in iTunes (enhanced AAC). [RSS MP3] Add the Engadget Podcast feed (in MP3) to your RSS aggregator and have the show delivered automatically. [RSS AAC] Add the Engadget Podcast feed (in enhanced AAC) to your RSS aggregator. [RSS OGG] Add the Engadget Podcast feed (in OGG) to your RSS aggregator. Hosts: Peter Rojas and Ryan Block Producer: Trent Wolbe Music: Solvent - Instructograph (Ghostly International) Program: 01:26 - 20GB PlayStation 3, RIP: 2006 - 2007 06:28 - Xbox 360 Spring 2007 Dashboard update 13:07 - How-To: play DivX and Xvid on your Apple TV 17:14 - Apple's Leopard delayed to October, iPhone blamed 24:16 - Apple sells 100 millionth iPod, deems experiment a success 27:45 - Palm prepping its own Linux-based OS 35:46 - Dell Axim, RIP: 2002 - 2007 40:12 - Hands-on with the SanDisk Sansa Connect 46:33 - The Engadget Mobile Interview: Sky Dayton, CEO of Helio 47:55 - The 2006 Engadget Awards - vote! LISTEN (MP3) LISTEN (AAC) LISTEN (OGG) Contact the podcast: 1-888-ENGADGET, Engadget (Gizmo Project) or podcast at engadget dawt com

  • Apple TV and HD quality: It's not the hardware

    by 
    Ben Drawbaugh
    Ben Drawbaugh
    04.11.2007

    We quickly realized that the Apple TV wasn't going to be a HD powerhouse and our tests have indicated as much -- we have also discovered that the problem is not the hardware. The Apple TV will not sync many videos and Apple has yet to provide any HD via the iTunes Music Store. Sure some of the trailers are in HD, but not all and how can we tell which without watching them. When we first started testing the Apple TV with a few HD clips we encoded ourselves, we were very disappointed and while it is still crazy to compare the Apple TV to HD DVD or Blu-ray, acceptable results are possible. We opened up our Apple TV and added a few codecs as well as copied over a few videos that would otherwise refuse to sync and we were very surprised at the results, not only were we able to watch some great looking HD, but our surround sound came alive with Dolby Digital 5.1 (no we don't count Prologic II). The real question is why: why would Apple not support DD 5.1, other codecs and most of all, why wouldn't they support higher bitrate video than 5Mbps when the Apple TV can play them so well? If the Apple TV fails to follow the iPod in it's foot steps, we will most certainly blame it on Apple decision to leave these out.

  • How-To: play DivX and Xvid on your Apple TV

    by 
    Ben Drawbaugh
    Ben Drawbaugh
    04.10.2007

    The two biggest Apple TV limitations are the lack of codec support (like XviD, DivX, etc.) and not even having the ability to do basic surround sound like Dolby Digital 5.1. These issues were resolved almost immediately after the Apple TV was released, although the hacks were somewhat less than practical. Something as simple as getting your Apple TV to, say, sync and recognize your XviD movies as playable was no simple feat. Thankfully, that's no longer the case, and we want to show you how to get the most out of your Apple TV. Who says you can't have your cake and eat it, too?

  • Samsung F500 Ultra Video officially becomes DivX-certified

    by 
    Brian White
    Brian White
    04.09.2007

    Although Samsung dropped the news on its newer F500 handset becoming the "world's first" DivX-certified handset when it was launched a few moons ago, DivX has made that statement certifiable, as the video codec and tech company announced today that the Samsung SGH-F500 "Ultra Video" would be the "world's first" handset with official DivX certification. If you've been waiting to get all those DivX movies and, umm, TV shows onto your handset for portable handset viewing, the Sammy F500 may be your ultimate golden handset, at least for 2007 or so. So, it's official -- let the DivX video start pouring from that F500 (when you get one, that is).

  • Cheap wireless media hack with Netgear access point and Dvico DivX box

    by 
    Conrad Quilty-Harper
    Conrad Quilty-Harper
    04.07.2007

    Using nothing but a Dvico M3100 DivX media player, a Netgear WGT634U wireless access point running some open firmware in the form of OpenWRT, and a bit of coding ingenuity, jkx has managed to create a wireless player that streams movies from his Media Center PC via WiFi. You'll need to have a way of swapping out the €50 WGT634U's firmware, and you'll definitely need these two specific models in order for this specific setup to work. Jkx owns the non-networked version of the Dvico, and that's the reason why the WGT634U with its USB port was needed. So really, this is bit too specific of a solution for streaming your content: in other words, it's one hacker's way of making half of his gear act the way he wanted it to by spending as little money as possible. Even if you can't emulate this specific example, maybe you should take jkx's idea as an inspiration and upgrade existing kit rather than taking the easy way out.[Via Hackaday]

  • Zune hacked for DivX support (sorta)

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    03.01.2007

    The Zune has already seen its fair share of hacks in its relatively short lifetime, from running Linux to supporting USB drives, but it seems that there's still plenty of room for improvement, the latest addition being a small but significant tweak that forces the device to play nice with your DivX files. Whipped up by a member of the Zune Scene forums, the hack simply consists of a modification to the Windows registry that allows DivX files to be dragged and dropped into the Zune software. Then, the next time you sync the device, the files are automatically transcoded into the more Zune-friendly WMV format, ready to be viewed at your leisure. The hack also apparently supports Xvid files, albeit with less than optimal results. Not exactly the solution that native DivX support on the player would be, but if you've got a pile of DivX file and nothing else to play 'em on, it looks like it's about the best you're gonna get for the foreseeable future. As always, however, if you're not comfortable messing with your registry, you may want to steer clear this one.

  • BitrateCalc 2.0: optimal DVD/DivX encoding

    by 
    Brian Liloia
    Brian Liloia
    02.05.2007

    BitrateCalc, a teensy little utility that calculates optimum bitrates for encoding video and audio for authoring DVDs and encoding DivX video discs, has been updated to version 2.0. Although it boasts no new features, it is now a Universal Binary. As far as using the program, all you are required to do is enter the time length of the video and choose your media type and audio bitrate, and you've got yourself a max bitrate figure for encoding that disc! Easy enough. (And free, of course.)

  • DivX & Xvid support too good to be true

    by 
    Andrew Yoon
    Andrew Yoon
    01.15.2007

    Homebrewers will want to be on the look-out once again. If fake downgraders that bricked your PSP weren't enough, apparently another piece of malicious code has hit the web: a supposed plugin for the PSP will allow your system to play AVI, DivX and Xvid files. The program, created by a programmer named "Sc00p," is in fact, littered with trojans that will attempt to infect your PC. Uncool. While it won't brick the PSP, it may be able to harm your computer.[Via DCEmu]

  • MediaGate finally launches MG-350HD, MG-35, and MG-25P in the US

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    01.08.2007

    This might not be quite as earth-rattling as iTunes getting ported to Windows, but it comes fairly close. MediaGate is finally launching its heralded media serving products here in the US of A, after spending two painstakingly long years parading around and thrilling folks in Japan. The "new" MG lineup are self-proclaimed "convergence products," and have done quite a swell job fusing data / media between the PC and TV, and now we Americans can get a taste of what we've been missing out on (or finding elsewhere). The MG-350HD entertainment server plays nice with Windows, Linux, and OS X-based operating systems, holds your choice of 3.5-inch hard drive, outputs in NTSC and PAL, and includes onboard Ethernet / WiFi, USB 2.0, stereo and digital audio outputs, DVI, S-Video, composite, and component. Moreover, it supports high definition streaming, MPEG1/2/3/4, AVI, M2V, DAT, VOD, XviD, OGG, WMA, BMP, GIF, and JPEG, and that's just to name a few popular formats. Aside from lacking WiFi, the MG-35 mimics its more feature-packed sibling just about to a T, but does tout Ximeta NDAS technology. The miniscule MG-25P boasts the most of the same functionality as its bigger brothers, but makes room for a 2.5-inch HDD, lacks a DVI out / WiFi, resides in a more durable enclosure for tight spots (like vehicles and shirt pockets), and also acts as "instant network storage" when you're done dishing out media. MediaGate's trio of media slingers are all supposedly available right now, with the MG-350HD costing $250, the MG-35 demanding $125, and the diminutive MG-25P running just around $80, all sans hard drives.

  • Keian intros KDVD850HDMI upscaling DVD player with DivX support

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    12.28.2006

    While we've seen quite a few luxurious upscaling DVD players come through for those still quietly sitting the fence as the Blu-ray / HD DVD war wages on, Keian's KDVD850HDMI offers up another reasonable substitute to full-fledged high definition discs, and throws in DivX support to boot. Aside from kicking plain ole DVDs up to 1080i via HDMI, playing back DivX files, and touting the admittedly strange dual microphone inputs for that karaoke flair, this unit also touts the ability to render picture-based slideshows and play back MP3 / WMA from USB thumb drives or flash memory cards (SD, MMC, MS, xD). Of course, you'll find the typical coaxial / optical digital audio outputs as well, and while this unit isn't apt to win any awards in the quality department, it should help your (presumably depleted) post-Christmas bank account out by demanding just ¥10,800 ($91).[Via Akihabara News]

  • Teclast kicks out sleek C260 do-it-all for Chinese market

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    12.27.2006

    Teclast is keeping things fresh with its latest style-conscious DAP / PMP / gaming handheld, the C260. Joining the growing fray of Chinese all-in-one wonders, this sexy machine boasts a 3.15- x 1.85- x 0.39-inch enclosure, 2.4-inch QVGA touchscreen, landscape layout, built-in FM radio tuner, audio input for recording, headphone jack, USB 2.0 connectivity, and eight pre-loaded equalizer functions. Aside from playing nice with MP3 / WAV on the audio side, it also reportedly supports XviD, DivX, and AVI on the video front, while displaying JPEG slideshows and simple text files on the side. Additionally, it purportedly features some sort of "gaming" functionality in case the tunes loaded on your microSD card get stale. So if you've been craving a do-it-all device that remarkably resembles LG's Chocolate handset, the 1GB C260 should be hitting the Chinese streets soon for just 399 CNY, or about $51.[Via AVing]

  • Mivx officially unveils MX-760HD HD WiFi media streamer

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    11.29.2006

    Mvix has certainly found its way to your living room before, and we've heard the rumblings of its latest HD streaming / storage device coming to fruition, but just before the holiday rush the firm is officially releasing the MX-760HD Wireless HD Media Center. This feature-laden box supports wireless media (HD thankfully included) streaming over 802.11g with full WEP support, and comes packed with an optional 200 to 750GB hard drive to store files remotely. Sporting a 7.4- x 7.6- x 2.3-inch enclosure, the Linux-based box plays nice with Windows systems and outputs in NTSC / PAL, and even includes an external LCD to give you quick updates on what's going where. Aside from WiFi, it also features Ethernet connectivity and USB ports, and Mvix even includes a remote to control the action from afar. On the rear, you'll find outputs for DVI, component, composite, stereo, and optical / coaxial digital audio to play back any of your DivX, MPEG 1/2/4, WMV, ASF, DAT, DVD, IFO, VOB, ISO, MP3, WMA, AAC, OGG, PCM, AC3, DTS, BMP, JPEG, and PNG files -- and that's just the tip of the iceberg. So if you're scouting a svelte HD streamer with internal storage to boot, the MX-760HD can be pre-ordered now (sans an internal HDD) for $329.[Thanks, Chris and Rich]

  • Casio EX-S770D brings DivX to Europe this month

    by 
    Cyrus Farivar
    Cyrus Farivar
    11.09.2006

    Oh Casio, why must you taunt us with such slick cameras and only make them available in Europe? Indeed, more than four months after the release of the EX-S600D, Casio has just launched its latest DivX-certified digicam, appropriately called the EX-S770D. This new cam is now rockin' 7.2 megapixels, shootin' DivX in a 16:9 aspect ratio,and packin' a 3x optical zoom (plus 4x digital zoom) along with a 2.8-inch screen. We don't know how many euros this'll cost, but it'll probably be somewhere around the EX-S770's (pictured) price of $380 (€298) when it hits the continent before December. [Warning: PDF link][Via DivX press release]

  • Latest DivX release adds 1080i and 1080p support

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    11.08.2006

    We've given you the pros and cons of DivX-HD, but now we've got one more reason to love the highly-regarded format: 1080p (and 1080i, too). You heard right, the next time you feel the need to rip and encode, you can do so in beautiful 1,920 x 1,080 resolution. In the latest DivX newsletter, support was annouced for "full HD digital video encoding in both interlaced and progressive scan modes," and readers were forewarned that watching those ole 640 x 480 clips may prove painful after experiencing this newfangled nirvana. Version 6.4 also boasted a few other improvements, including "faster multipass encoding, better compression when using internal resize filters, and a new adaptive noise reduction feature" to improve overall quality. So, stop hangin' around and give the new tools a go, eh?

  • How-To: Transcode & stream videos on Xbox 360

    by 
    James Ransom-Wiley
    James Ransom-Wiley
    11.07.2006

    Last week's Xbox 360 Fall Dashboard update added support for the Windows Media Video (WMV) video codec. The feature was a welcomed gain for non-Media Center users who have been limited to photo and music sharing between their Windows PCs and Xbox 360s -- and to anyone who's longed to watch video files on 360 via a thumb drive or CD/DVD.Unfortunately, licensing fees and digital rights concerns have limited the patch to WMV-support only. Being Microsoft's proprietary format, WMV is neither popular or oft-used, taking a backseat to preferred codecs like DivX and XviD. And so, we're still left scrambling for a solution to getting our video content onto Xbox 360.

  • LiteOn HD-A070GX HD PVR with HDD and DVD

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    10.26.2006

    It's all been done before, and we're sure it'll all be done again, but LiteOn's new HD-A970GX hybrid PVR boasts of HD resolutions, and works with a hard drive and DVD drive for storage and playback. The 320GB drive isn't the largest around, but it should do the trick, and the included HDMI cable is a nice touch. The A970GX records video to DivX so you can ship your recordings over to you PC or portable player without much hassle. The unit also does the 1080p upscale thing, which is still one of your best bets for getting passable "HD" content for your fancy HDTV. No word on price or availability.[Via PVR Wire]

  • dCube unveils HD XviD-playing MV-8600HD at KES

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    10.24.2006

    The flashy gizmos that keep popping up at this year's Korean Electronics Show continue to impress, and next up is dCube's media-playing extraoridinaire, the MV-8600HD. This stylish box boasts an optical drive that plays nice with a myriad of formats, including HD XviD, MPEG1/2/4, AVI, VOB, IFO, ASF, and WMV on the video side, while supporting MP3, WMA, AAC, OGG, PCM, and AC3 on the musical front. The device can output video at 1080i resolution (no word on upscaling, however), and rocks DVI, component, composite, and S-Video outputs to complement the stereo, coaxial, and optical digital audio ports. It even sports a pair of USB 2.0 ports and integrated Ethernet / WiFi, presumably for attaching external storage and making it accessible over a network. As expected, there's no skinny on pricing or availability details, but you should be able to import this all-in-one wonder stateside real soon.

  • Another petition for Divx / Xvid support

    by 
    Ken Weeks
    Ken Weeks
    10.21.2006

    Normally these petition efforts collapse under the crushing weight of futility, but this one, demanding Divx / Xvid support, already has over 3200 signatures.[Thanks KineticOnline]

  • Toshiba's new prototype media player at CEATEC

    by 
    Cyrus Farivar
    Cyrus Farivar
    10.04.2006

    Speaking of CEATEC, Akihabara News also spotted a new prototype of a Toshiba portable DVD and media player at this year's Japanese trade show. All we know for now is that it supports DivX files and has a 1Seg tuner for your Japanese terrestrial digital broadcasts, but it we're always happy to add more methods of media retrieval to our ho hum standard def optical disc portables. Oh, and it comes in a shiny black casing, if you're so inclined.