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  • Dyson plans big R&D expansion, starting with a new 3,000-person tech campus

    by 
    Mat Smith
    Mat Smith
    04.09.2014

    One in every three Dyson employees is an engineer. That's roughly 1,700 of them and the UK-based company is looking to increase that number. It's announced plans to build a new technology campus in Wiltshire, UK, focused on science and technology research and development. The plan includes four different facilities within a single one leafy compound in Wiltshire, UK. It'll cost £250 million to build it, and could create around 3,000 new tech and science jobs. Dyson will scale up its R&D efforts from here, with collaborative topics like its recently-announced robot research lab expanded and "strengthened" with help from over 10 UK universities -- the company has already cooperated with Cambridge, Imperial and Newcastle while it developed its existing products. Finely-engineered robots, new motors (and probably a few high-end vacuums) are likely just a few years away. Better watch yourself, Roomba. Image Credit: Getty

  • Dyson issues recall after bladeless heater starts a few 'contained' fires (update)

    by 
    Timothy J. Seppala
    Timothy J. Seppala
    03.17.2014

    As if a legal battle with Samsung wasn't bad enough, Dyson has to put out a fire within its own walls now. The company's issued a voluntary recall for the heater versions of its Air Multiplier fans because a few have short-circuited and caught alight, as spotted by Reuters. The entire sales run (around 1,000,000 units, as Dyson tells it) will be recalled after reports that four of them malfunctioned, resulting in "contained burning" inside the machines. For its part, the outfit says that there haven't been any instances of injury or property damage; it's simply being proactive to get this straightened out as soon as possible. How soon? Well, Dyson promises more info within 24 hours. We'll update this post as new details arrive. Update: Dyson has apparently started the recall process abroad (including in Israel and the United Arab Emirates). After registering your product, the company will contact you to schedule delivery of a new unit and pickup of the old one. Perhaps best of all, the replacement heater comes with a two-year warranty on parts and labor. Update 2: The company hasn't gotten the formal go-ahead for a recall in the US, but customers in the States can register at this site to get the ball rolling. [Thanks for sending this in, Kaschif!]

  • Samsung countersues Dyson over vacuum copycat claims (update)

    by 
    Matt Brian
    Matt Brian
    02.17.2014

    Dyson's decision to sue Samsung over claims it copied its vacuum design looks like it's really starting to suck. Less than six months after it took action against the Korean company for allegedly infringing its patents, which it later dropped, Dyson now finds itself on the receiving end of a multi-million dollar countersuit. The Korea Times reports that Samsung isn't looking to prove the validity of its designs. Instead it's focusing on the resulting legal fallout: The company claims last year's litigation "hurt [its] corporate image" by labeling it as a serial copycat, so it's seeking 10 billion won ($9.43 million) compensation because it "negatively affected" Samsung as a brand. Dyson pulled its original claim after it found examples of prior art, allowing Samsung to take its stand against "patent trolls that use litigations as a marketing tool," and warn off other companies looking to take similar action. Strong words indeed, Dyson certainly won't want to let the dust settle on this case.

  • Dyson invests over $8 million into robot research lab (and it's not just for vacuums)

    by 
    Mat Smith
    Mat Smith
    02.09.2014

    Dyson has announced that it'll invest £5 million into a robotics labs at Imperial College London, aimed at developing vision systems to help robots "understand and adapt to the world around them." The company had in fact planned to launch a robotic vacuum cleaner way back in 2001, but Sir Dyson said the prototype was too heavy and expensive... and it never hit stores. This time, research won't only concern itself with automated vacuums but other domestic robots, according to the BBC. Dyson has apparently been working on robotics with Imperial College since 2005: the university's Professor Andrew Davison is set to head up the new lab. "We now have the mechanical and electronic capabilities, but robots still lack understanding" James Dyson says there's still a lot of work to be done: "My generation believed the world would be overrun by robots by the year 2014. We now have the mechanical and electronic capabilities, but robots still lack understanding... mastering this will make our lives easier and lead to previously unthinkable technologies." -- and probably some new Dyson hardware that's harder to imitate.

  • Dyson's latest vacuums still look alien, boast more sucking power

    by 
    Jon Turi
    Jon Turi
    01.16.2014

    Over the years, Dyson's managed to vault its line of household suction beasts into the world of enviable gadgets -- a rare feat for a home appliance. And the company hasn't been sitting on its laurels with recent successes: Dyson's engineers have been hard at work to make them smaller, lighter and more powerful. The latest upright and hand-vac models -- the DC 58/59 and the DC65 -- are a testament to this ethos. While the sleek, space-age design has remained virtually unchanged from previous models, there are a series of under-the-hood improvements and some of the changes were tailored specifically for the US market. The new DC65 upright vacuum arrives in three flavors: Multifloor ($499), Animal ($599) and Animal Complete ($649), and boasts a remodeled airflow and new brush design, which are said to improve suction by 25 percent. For wire haters, the cordless varieties got overhauled too in the DC58 ($250) handheld and DC59 ($500) digital slim; both arrive with Dyson's new V6 digital motor that hits 110,000RPM to get at those fine specks of dreck that have settled into your floor's nether regions. All these models will be landing at Best Buy starting January 19th, just in time to prepare for spring cleaning. Update: Dyson's initial release estimates were incorrect. The DC65, DC58 and DC59 will all be available starting January 19th.

  • Captain's Log: Star Trek Online's reputation systems for the new player

    by 
    Terilynn Shull
    Terilynn Shull
    12.16.2013

    One thing new MMO players will learn is that games that have levels inevitably also have a level cap, meaning that when a character reaches the highest level, there's not often much left to do other than to wait for a new expansion. This conundrum has left many developers trying to find ways to keep players in the game while they worked on new, larger content pushes. Many accomplish the task by creating repeatable quests or missions. Some games, Star Trek Online included, have integrated what are known as reputation systems into their games. Reputation systems are meant to keep players participating in repeatable content, allowing them to apply the currency received from that play to obtain select items and unique rewards.

  • Dyson sues Samsung for copying vacuum design

    by 
    Matt Brian
    Matt Brian
    09.10.2013

    If Samsung's patent infringement battle with Apple wasn't enough, the Korean company is in the spotlight again over claims that it intentionally copied the design of a patented Dyson vacuum. The British manufacturer has filed a lawsuit with the UK High Court accusing Samsung of duplicating the steering mechanism used in its DC cylinder models and embedding a similar component in the new Motion Sync vacuum cleaner (unveiled last week at IFA 2013). Unfortunately for Samsung, Dyson patented the mechanism back in 2009, which has led Sir James Dyson, the company's founder, to call it a "cynical rip-off." Considering Dyson successfully sued its rival for infringing on its "triple-cyclone" patent four years ago, Samsung's lawyers might just have to suck it up and make a settlement offer.

  • Dyson DC47 and DC50 Animal vacuums shrink in size but not in suction

    by 
    Nicole Lee
    Nicole Lee
    05.14.2013

    If you're one of the remaining holdouts who hasn't yet picked up a Dyson vacuum cleaner, get ready to be enticed by a couple new ones. The household name in suction has introduced two new "Animal" series dust busters, the DC47 and the DC50. The former is canister-shaped, while the DC50 stands upright. Both were designed to be much smaller and lighter than their predecessors, with the DC47 weighing in at 13.47 pounds and the DC50 tipping in at 11.6 pounds. They both boast 2 Tier Radial cyclones to extract more microscopic dust, a new Ball pivot that's supposedly more maneuverable and carbon fiber brushes that promise to remove more dust from hard floors due to a lack of static build-up. If you're sold, get ready to cough up some major cash: the DC47 Animal is $449.99, while the DC50 Animal is $499.99. If you want the latest and greatest in designer vacuums, you can snag one from the source link or your favorite Dyson retailer.

  • Dyson's latest AirBlade dries your freshly washed hands straight from the Tap

    by 
    Joe Pollicino
    Joe Pollicino
    02.04.2013

    While it was never the most original take on powerful commercial hand driers, the Dyson AirBlade has nevertheless been an admirable piece of public restroom kit. Now seven years since its official debut, the company's refreshed the super-charged water dissipator to be 5.5-pounds lighter, dubbing it the AirBlade mk2. Taking things a step further, a new V-shaped model can output the same 420mph blower speed in a package that's roughly sixty-percent smaller. Dyson didn't stop there, though, as its Tap model brings the tech straight to the faucet. The stainless steel enclosure houses the same 1,400-watt DC brushless motor as the previous models, dispersing HEPA-filtered "sheets" of air through a single laser-cut slit in each of two wings that extend from the Tap's sides. The silenced, carbon fiber-enclosed motor is positioned away from the sink whether it's on a wall or a counter, leaving only the streamlined faucet in view. More interesting yet, we're told it reaches 92,000RPM in about 0.7 seconds! Of course, the system is totally automated, with infrared sensors for the water and dryer portions. Sure, over-engineered does come to mind, but we can't say we wouldn't be giddy to get our mitts under one at some point. As it stands, hand-washing connoisseurs can begin placing orders for the Tap come February 5th, and the others in May. For now, you can get your hands dirty (clean?) by clicking past the break for the obligatory detailed press release and video demo.

  • IRL: Dyson DC44, NUU ClickMate PowerPlus and the Galaxy S III

    by 
    Engadget
    Engadget
    09.30.2012

    Welcome to IRL, an ongoing feature where we talk about the gadgets, apps and toys we're using in real life and take a second look at products that already got the formal review treatment. Can't get more random than this, folks: in this week's edition of IRL, we have Darren recommending a vacuum cleaner, Dan Cooper continuing his search for a backup phone charger and Jon Fingas putting the Galaxy S III to the test against his beloved HTC One X.

  • Dyson's engineers head off to the races, create dragsters using spare parts, DC-16 motors (video)

    by 
    Joe Pollicino
    Joe Pollicino
    04.13.2012

    Dyson engineers certainly know a thing or two about creating innovative vacuums and fans Air Multipliers, but did you know they've also dabbled in the world of high-speed racing? Such is apparently now the case, as these folks were tasked with building go-kart drag racers out of spare parts, resulting in a variety of wheeled wonders viaing for the fastest run on a makeshift strip in the office. Of course, there was a catch -- all of the dragsters had to use the motor from Dyson's DC-16 handheld vacuum in a battle for maximum torque. We won't spoil the outcomes for you, so scroll down to catch a video mashup of all the hijinks in the video below.

  • Dyson's DC39 stateside-bound, couples canister footprint with 'Ball'-functionality come March

    by 
    Dante Cesa
    Dante Cesa
    02.24.2012

    Lest you thought its previous 'City' endeavors were the pinnacle of diminutive bag-less suction, here comes Dyson with the DC39. Previously available elsewhere, the British company's latest canister will soon sashay into the US for a cool $499. That's a sizable wad of cash, yet that investment nets you access to a diminutive vacuum stuffed with the company's 'Ball' technology -- enabling a teensy unit already capable of a lot of suck to be infinitely more maneuverable. That's apparently no small feat, as it took seventy engineers more than three years to stuff over a hundred components into that spherical derriere. Those interested can look for it mid-March -- for the rest of us, PR and a cutaway of its insides await after the break.

  • Inhabitat's Week in Green: Rolls Royce 102EX test drive, electric unicycle and a sun-powered leaf

    by 
    Inhabitat
    Inhabitat
    11.13.2011

    Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green. Electric vehicle momentum swept the states this week as Inhabitat took a spin in the new Rolls Royce 102EX Phantom EV, and we brought you exclusive photos of BMW's brand new i3 and i8 electric cars. We also showcased six sexy electric vehicles set to hit the streets in 2012, watched a 350MPG EV win the Future Car Challenge, and saw scientists create the world's smallest electric vehicle from a molecule and four motors. Meanwhile, El Al airlines announced plans to launch a line of hybrid-electric Boeing 737 airplanes, Ryno unveiled a crazy electric unicycle, and a team of students revealed Uganda's first electric car. It was a big week for alternative energy as well as Kenya announced plans to tap lava power with a newly Toshiba-built geothermal energy plant and scientists made a breakthrough in using urine as a viable power source. We also looked into a scientist claiming to have achieved cold fusion, a 'solar cucumber' that harvests fresh drinking water from the ocean, and a sun-powered leaf capable of making ice in the desert. In other news, green textiles advanced by leaps and bounds as scientists wove fabric from 24-karat gold, researchers developed a reusable fabric that administers drugs through the skin, and the University of Kiel's developed a super-adhesive tape inspired by Gecko skin. We also showcased an incredible set of sculptures made from recycled circuit boards, we watched a crop of styrofoam robots invade Germany's streets, and we saw an innovative self-powered irrigation system win the 2011 James Dyson award. And just in time for the chilly winter season, we found these oh-so-handy texting gloves which feature conductive fingertips that allow you to touch, tap, or type on any mobile touchscreen outdoors without having to remove your gloves.

  • IRL: Kingston Wi-Drive, Dyson DC35 and being an Ubuntu fanboy

    by 
    Engadget
    Engadget
    10.26.2011

    Welcome to IRL, an ongoing feature where we talk about the gadgets, apps and toys we're using in real life and take a second look at products that already got the formal review treatment. The lively comments in yesterday's Nest thermostat post got us thinking: for all our talk of smartphones and Ultrabooks, it's the mundane, not-glamorous stuff that we're spending most of our money on. Take Brad, for instance, who had to make room in his iTunes library for the Aladdin soundtrack and had to get creative after maxing out his iPhone's (non-expandable) storage. Or Zach, who felt not one, but two vacuum cleaners were necessary in his bachelor pad. And at least one of us avoids paying anything by choosing to tinker around in Ubuntu. How'd Brad make do with his 16GB of fixed storage? Why is Zach such a compulsive cleaner? And who's the Linux fanboy on staff? Meet us after the break to find out.

  • Dyson intros Hot AM04, aims to change the home heating game (video)

    by 
    Joe Pollicino
    Joe Pollicino
    09.14.2011

    Leave it to James Dyson to give your ordinary household appliance a new spin. Tonight in New York City, Mr. Dyson took to the stage in order to properly unveil his latest gizmo -- the $399.99 Dyson Hot AM04. As its name suggests, this is the company's latest fan Air Multiplier, but with a ceramic heating element to keep your toes toasty. On those muggy summer days, you'll be able keeps things breezy similar to previous Air Multipliers, and when the winter's bitter cold hits, you'll be able to heat things up anywhere from 32 degrees Fahrenheit to as high as 99 degrees -- caliente. The unit is designed much like a jet's wing, bringing air in from its bottom grills and amplifying it six times as it soars out through the ducts. Interestingly enough, we're told that the heating element stays at one preset temperature, measuring the room until it reaches the level you tell it to. As you'd expect, an inbuilt safety mechanism flips the whole thing off if it tips over. With its tiltable base or an included IR remote, you'll be able to change the temperature, choose between ten fan speeds and set it into an oscillation mode. Better yet, the remote magnetically clings to the top of the unit -- perfect if you're prone to losing things. It's currently available in white or silver directly from Dyson (though a remote-less version is tipped for those looking to save a few bucks), and you'll find more details in the PR past the break. %Gallery-133818%

  • Dyson unleashes DC41 Animal vacuum cleaner for pigpen apartments

    by 
    Amar Toor
    Amar Toor
    09.01.2011

    We normally wouldn't leave our housework in the hands of an animal, but Dyson's new DC41 Animal vacuum cleaner may force us to reconsider. The company's latest Ball-based sweeper uses Dyson's proprietary (and complicated-sounding) Radial Root Cyclone technology to maximize its 235 air watts of suction power -- most of which is concentrated at the cleaner's head. It also ships with a mini turbine head, which you can use to clean up the hair that real animals leave on your car seat. In true Dysonian fashion, however, this Ball-bearing beast won't come for cheap. You can scoop one up at the source link below, for a cool $600.

  • Beats by Dr. Dre get the ColorWare treatment, minus the color (video)

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    04.20.2011

    Now, you'd think ColorWare would be working furiously to release some flashy iPad 2s, but that's not what we're getting today -- instead we now have a pair of Monster headphones to complement that ever-so-necessary neon Dyson Air Multiplier we assume you've already added to every room in your tastefully decorated mansion. These very limited edition ColorWare "Chrome Beats" headphones don't actually have any color, but they admittedly do look pretty slick, excepting the $1,000 price tag necessitated by this perfect storm of overpriced branding. ColorWare is only decking out 50 of these 'cans, so grab that platinum card and head over to our source link to get your pair.

  • ColorWare hits a lurid low with Dyson Air Multiplier

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    01.25.2011

    When it comes to ColorWare, the surprise is never the choice of colors, it's the price you'll pay for exclusivity on a lime-green and suicide-orange paint job. This time its the already overpriced $300 Dyson Air Multiplier getting the $450 ColorWare treatment. For that absurd price you'll be treated to a brand new "bladeless fan" personalized with the airfoil, base, and control colors of your choosing from a healthy palette of gloss and sofTouch finishes. Of course, there's always the $150 option to send in your existing product for ColorWarezation, assuming you can go three weeks without habitually demonstrating the concepts of inducement and entrainment to baffled pets and family.

  • Dyson City review

    by 
    Tim Stevens
    Tim Stevens
    11.02.2010

    When it comes to vacuums it's obvious that we tend to like the ones that propel themselves -- your Roombas and your XV-11s and the like. But, when it comes to getting something properly clean sometimes you need to break out the manually modulated models, and those from Dyson tend to be the most coveted. The $399 Dyson City is the latest, a little sucker for those with smaller floor plans and shorter attention spans. But, we think it's good enough for country folk too. %Gallery-106447%

  • Keepin' it real fake: Dyson's Air Multiplier gets ripped off, multiplied a few more times

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    09.06.2010

    We never really understood the value proposition behind Dyson's (admittedly boisterous) Air Multiplier, but that's mostly due to the $300+ MSRP. Cut that back to right around $40, and you just might have us singing a different tune. Thanks to the wonders of KIRFing, Dyson's bladeless fan has seen itself duped and multiplied over in China, with a 10-inch version now selling for just $41.05 so long as you buy ten or more units. Abiko seems to the company hawking the knockoffs, with its version reportedly "indistinguishable from the original." So, what's it going to be? The real deal? Or the real deal? Update: Dyson requested that we add this comment, so we're more than happy to present you with it. "The Dyson Air Multiplier™ fans were launched in 2009 after four years of research and development. A team of specialist Dyson engineers have refined and patented the technology: illegal copies are of significantly inferior quality. Dyson rigorously defends its intellectual property and treats any infringement very seriously. Dyson is taking legal action against anyone who copies its technology."