Lumix

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  • Panasonic intros Lumix DMC-L10 DSLR

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    08.30.2007

    Panasonic's still relatively new to the DSLR game, but it looks like it's intent on proving its worth, and it's now rolled out its second such camera: the Lumix DMC-10. This one clocks in at a hefty 10.1 megapixels, and boasts a swiveling 2.5-inch LCD, along with Panasonic's Venus Engine III image processor, a "Supersonic Wave Filter" dust reduction system, and some nifty features like face detection and "intelligent ISO control." You'll also get a LEICA D VARIO-ELMAR 14-50mm / F3.8-5.6 ASPH. / MEGA OIS lens with the camera, which can of course be swapped out if you're looking to mix things up a bit. Look for this one to be available sometime this October with an MSRP of $1,300.%Gallery-6584%

  • Panasonic unleashes a trio of wide angle, 8 megapixelers: Lumix FX33, FX55, and FZ18

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    07.24.2007

    Panasonic just unveiled a trio of new Lumix shooters: the wide angle DMC-FX33 and DMC-FX55 (pictured) with 3-inch LCD and FZ18 with 18x optical zoom. Kicking things off are the two nearly identical 28-mm wide angle compacts. The FX33 bests its FX30 sib by packing an 8.1 megapixel 1/2.5-inch CCD and new light sensor to increase the 2.5-inch LCD's brightness when in direct sunlight. The FX55 then, brings the same pixel count along with that monster 3-inch LCD and same 28-mm wide angle, 3.6x optical zoom LEICA DC lens. The DMC-FZ18 meanwhile, brings the same CCD sensor only with a 28-mm wide angle, 18x optical zoom Leica DC Vario-Elmarit lens. All three ship in a variety of colors with face detection tech and Panny's optical image stabilization which will definitely come in handy on the biggie zoom.%Gallery-5175%[Via LetsGoDigital] Read -- DMC-FX55 Read -- DMC-FX33 Read -- DMC-FZ18

  • Panasonic's Lumix DMC-FS2: another ho-hum 7.2 megapixel shooter

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    06.04.2007

    Panasonic just slid out a new Lumix shooter in Japan under the name DMC-FS2. It comes packing plenty of average with a 7.2 megapixel CCD, 3x Leica DC Vario-Elmarit zoom lens, ISO 3200 "high sensitivity" mode, and 2.5-inch LCD on the backside. It can record about 350 shots off a single charge and record 848 x 480 video at 30fps direct to SDHC/SD cards. The FS2 will ship in choice of pink, black, or silver in Japan (and presumably beyond) starting mid-June for an undisclosed price.%Gallery-3620%[Via Impress]

  • Panasonic's wide-angle Lumix DMC-FX30 gets reviewed

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    06.01.2007

    Panasonic's 7.2-megapixel Lumix DMC-FX30 doesn't hold any world records in terms of size or amenities, but the point-and-shoot does manage to offer up some fairly decent innards for a relatively modest price -- none of which matter if performance suffers. To find out just how worthy Panny's wide-angle, OIS-equipped snapper is of your cash, DigicamReview took it for a spin and threw in its two cents (er, pence). Interestingly, the device was generally hailed as an excellent choice for those in the market for a pocketable camera, as the highly-regarded Leica 3.6x optical zoom lens, effective image stabilization, versatile 2.5-inch LCD, logical menu structure, and respectable image quality all took home praises. The only real digs on the shooter came from high amounts of noise when shooting with a cranked ISO (and even some at ISO 100) and the inclusion of red-eye in some snapshots, but both negatives aren't strangers to the handheld camera realm. Overall, reviewers seemed overly giddy about the FX30, and while we'd certainly give Canon's SD800 IS a glance before plunking down on this wide-angled digicam, the low price of the Panasonic just might help make up your mind.

  • Panasonic's 12 megapixel Lumix DMC-FX100: a wide-angle, "HD video" shooter

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    05.21.2007

    Oh boy, lookie lookie. Panasonic just announced their new Lumix FX top-ender, the DMC-FX100. Packing a 1/1.72-inch, 12.2 megapixel CCD, this compact shooter manages to squeeze in a 28mm wide-angle Leica DC lens with 3.6x optical zoom. The cam features VE III processing along with Panny's Mega Optical Image Stabilizer and Intelligent ISO control (up to a 6400 sensitivity) to reduce blurring. Shutter release is measured at 0.009 seconds while bursting 8 shots per second at full resolution. It even records WVGA (848 x 480) video at 30fps or 1280 x 720 at 15fps direct to SDHC/SD cards. Nice, should be a winner by the time the reviews roll around.

  • The 2006 Engadget Awards: Vote for Digital Camera of the Year

    by 
    Ryan Block
    Ryan Block
    04.13.2007

    Now's your chance to cast your ballot for the 2006 Digital Camera of the Year! Our Engadget Awards nominees are listed below, and you've got until 11.59PM EST on Monday, April 16th to file your vote. You can only vote once, so make it count, and may the best tech win! The nominees: Canon 400D / Rebel XTi, Canon SD800, Nikon D80, Panasonic Lumix DMC-L1, Sony Alpha 100, and Sony HDR-SR1. %Poll-324%

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX12 reviewed

    by 
    Conrad Quilty-Harper
    Conrad Quilty-Harper
    03.05.2007

    The Photography Blog has a review up of Panasonic's new Lumix DMC-FX12 point and shoot cam, one of the first we've seen from Panasonic's 2007 range of cameras. In terms of basic specifications, the DMC-FX12 is a middle-of-the-pack 7.2 megapixel camera that features a 35mm 3x zoom lens. The Photography Blog found the design to be one of the strongest aspects of the device, with a thin (0.95-inches) case making it feasible to keep it in a pants pocket: one thing we noticed from the pictures is that it has some pretty awful stickers on the front, albeit removable ones. On the back is a large 2.5-inch LCD (which replaces the viewfinder) which the review mentions was rather low resolution. As for image quality, this was found to be favorable, especially with regard to the lack of noise compared to former models at high sensitivities. On the downside, you've got to delve into the menus in order to change the sensitivity, and the output of all images tended to be on the soft side. This latter problem is confounded by the complete lack of any setting to change sharpness: you'll be booting up Photoshop in that case. Overall, the Lumix isn't a revolutionary camera, but it is a very respectable all-rounder that happens to produce low light output that beats its predecessors. It should be available this month for around $229.

  • Panasonic's 2007 line-up of Lumix cams -- the other 9

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    01.31.2007

    You already seen their best, now check the rest of Panasonic's 2007 Lumix digital cameras: the TZ3/TZ2 (pictured), FX12/FX10, LZ7/LZ6, and LS75/LS70/LS60. All the new digicams deliver Panasonic's Mega OIS optical image stabilization, Venus Engine III image processing capable of recording shots at ISO 1250 sensitivity, and the ability to record 848 x 480 videos to SDHC or SD cards at 30fps. The DMC-TZ2 and DMC-TZ3 are all purpose, wide-angle shooters which carry some bulk unlike the new DMC-FX30 we checked earlier. Both the TZ2 and $349 TZ3 ship in May and pack a 28mm wide-angle, 10x optical zoom LEICA DC VARIO-ELMAR lens in a less appealing (and less expensive) chubtastic slab. The TZ3 sports a 8.5 megapixel CCD and 3-inch 230k color LCD while the TZ2 brings both a smaller 7.39 megapixel CCD and 2.5-inches LCD capable of 207k colors. The $229 DMC-FX12 and $199 DMC-FX10 should hit in March with a regular 3x LEICA DC VARIO-ELMARIT optical zoom lens and 7.2 and 6.0 megapixel CCDs, respectively. The $199 DMC-LZ7 and $179 DMC-LZ6 each boast a 7.2 megapixel CCD, 6x LUMIX DC VARIO optical zoom lens and convenient AA battery operation. The LZ7 offers a 2.5-inch LCD versus the LZ6's 2.0-inch display. Bringing up the rear is the LS-series of Lumix cams. AA-batteries and a 3x LUMIX DC VARIO optical zoom lens can be found in each of these entry level models with the LS75 sporting a 2.5-inch LCD and 7.2 megapixel CCD. The LS70 shares the CCD but steps the LCD to 2-inches like the LS60 which further cuts the CCD down to 6.0 megapixels. We'll punch in the holes on price and availability when the details roll in. All the pics after the break.[Via LetsGoDigital, Thanks David] Read -- DMC-TZ3 / TZ2 Read -- DMC-FX12 / FX10 Read -- DMC-LZ7 / LZ6 Read -- DMC-LS75 / LS70 / LS60

  • Panasonic's DMC-FX30 wide-angle 7.2 megapixel shooter: not quite the world's slimmest

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    01.31.2007

    Panasonic is also unveiling their Lumix DMC-FX30 this morning which Panny claims is the "world's slimmest" to pack a 28mm wide-angle lens. Ok, but at 22-mm (0.87-inches) it's a full 0.2-mm thicker than the listed specs for Samsung's new 28mm wide-angle L74 which packs the same 7.2 megapixel CCD and 3.6x zoom but a bigger 3.0-inch touchscreen LCD around back. Thing is, the L74 has an irregular shape so who knows what to believe at this point -- it wouldn't be the first time Samsung fudged its numbers. So... hyperbole aside, the FX30 is thin and features a 3.6x LEICA DC VARIO-ELMARIT optical zoom lens, 7.2 megapixel CCD, Mega OIS optical image stabilization, Venus Engine III image-processing for shooting at ISO 1250, and a 2.5-inch 207k pixel LCD (the L74 throws down 230k pixels) with "Power LCD" to boost brightness by 40% (at the expense of battery life) when outdoors. It also records 848 x 480 video to SDHC cards at 30fps and shoots with a shutter release time lag of 0.005 seconds and a 2 frames per second burst mode at full resolution for a maximum of just 5 images. Rounding things out are a 280 picture battery and $349 price tag when these ship sometime in February. [Via LetsGoDigital, Thanks David]

  • Panasonic's DMC-FZ8 shoots 7.2 megapixels with a 12x zoom

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    01.31.2007

    Panasonic is kicking out their new 2007 Lumix camera lineup this morning. We'll brings you all of 'em later but let's get busy with the biggest news of the bunch first, the DMC-FZ8 -- heir apparent to the hotly reviewed DMC-FZ7. Positioned right in that gap between high-end compacts and DSLRs, the new FZ8 features Panny's Venus Engine III image processor and delivers a 7.2 megapixel CCD sensor, 12x LEICA DC VARIO-ELMARIT optical zoom lens, optical image stabilization, RAW file format support, ISO 1250 sensitivity, an SDHC memory card slot, and the ability to shoot 848 x 480 video at 30fps. It's at the ready with a 1.8 second startup time, 0.005 second shutter release lag, and a burst mode that shoots at a rate of 3 frames per second at full resolution until your memory card is full or the 380-shot battery gives up the ghost. Available in March for a righteous $349.[Via LetsGoDigital, Thanks David]

  • Panasonic FX-07 gets limited edition lacquer

    by 
    Ryan Block
    Ryan Block
    11.26.2006

    Those Lumix FX-07s are surely fast sellers, but apparently Panny had no problem goosing sales a little with some limited edition versions of the compact shooter. Manufactured in 100 piece lots, these FX-07s come in five unique finishes, and are packaged in paulownia wood boxes for the tidy sum of ¥59,800 (about $515). Our pan-Pacific pals can get one of the 500 pieces being produced come December 12th.

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ50 reviewed

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    09.09.2006

    While the DMC-FZ50 was never intended to be a complete overhaul of the well-regarded DMC-FZ30 it replaces, it seemed that Panasonic was trying to address the gripes on the prior model, as well as toss in a few unexpected niceties to boot. Apparently the upgrade was a success, as the folks at DPReview found a lot to love about the evolutionary camera, especially for the price. Sporting the obligatory 12x zoom, 10.1 megapixels (up from 8), a TTL flash hot shoe, SDHC support, 16:9 movie / still mode, Venus III Engine (upgraded from the Venus II), and an Intelligent ISO that adjusts up to 1600 on the fly, this hybrid megazoom packs an impressive spec list. Reviewers were quick to praise the high-end feature set, and felt that it outpaced the competition in terms of amenities, but did point out that image quality suffered due to the small sensor used to compensate for all those megapixels. The biggest digs came from the added noise and bleeding colors found at any ISO above 100 (like many Panasonics), but these qualms were quickly solved by downsizing the images for normal viewing / storage. Overall, DPReview slapped a "Highly Recommended" tag on the FZ50, and apparently weren't too dissatisfied with the image hiccups, as they pronounced it "the best equipped, best specified, and best handling bridge camera on the market today." With a claim like that backing it up, dropping $650 on this shooter doesn't seem all that painful.

  • Panasonic's Lumix DMC-FZ50 10 megapixel shooter

    by 
    Evan Blass
    Evan Blass
    07.19.2006

    We're not done with Panasonic's new additions to the Lumix lineup just yet; in addition to the four compact shooters we just saw, the company also unveiled a prosumer model called the DMC-FZ50, which packs a 10.3 megapixel CCD and 12x optical zoom into a DSLR-like body. Besides improving upon the resolution of its 8 megapixel predecessor, the FZ30, the FZ50 also throws down a new feature called Intelligent ISO Control, which adjusts the ISO setting (max. 1600) and shutter speed based on subject movement -- promising to minimize image blur without forcing the user to adjust the manual controls. Further enhancing ease-of-use are a new Function button that delivers quick access to frequently-used settings and a longer-life battery that claims to deliver around 360 shots before recharging becomes an issue. Other differences between the FZ30 and FZ50 include the addition of SDHC card support, a TTL Flash hot-shoe, 16:9 shooting mode, and the so-called Venus Engine III image processor, but the elimination of TIFF file support and several thousand pixels from the 2.0-inch LCD. Luckily the higher resolution and new features don't mean that you'll pay too much more for this updated model than you did for the old one, as it's expected to cost just $650 when it hits stores in September.

  • Panasonic unleashes slew of Lumix compacts

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    07.19.2006

    Our friends at Panasonic are really coming out swinging today. Their new range of Lumix compacts has some considerable spec bumps, and even if the designs do seem a little "safe" after Samsung's recent release, we're sure most consumers could fine a decent fit among the new lineup. Headlining is the DMC-LX2 (pictured), a successor to their LX1 which introduced the first compact 16:9 widescreen sensor. The LX2 bumps the megapixels to 10.2, has a 2.8-inch widescreen LCD, ISO 3200 (though not at full resolution) and intelligent ISO control that can automatically adjust for the sudden movement of a subject. Despite the increase in resolution, Panasonic claims they've significantly reduced noise thanks to their Venus III engine. The LX2 also includes a 4x zoom, and optical image stabilisation. Next up we have the DMC-FX50 and FX07, dual successors to the FX01 shooter. Both of them share a 7.2 megapixel CCD, 3.6x zoom, optical image stabilisation, and that Venus III processor, ISO 3200 and intelligent ISO control featured in big brother LX2. The FX50 goes for a new 3-inch screen, while the FX07 sticks with 2.5-inches and manages a slightly more compact body. Finally, the DMC-FX3 takes some cues from its siblings, but cuts the megapixels to 6. The optical image stabilisation is always welcome, but the ISO 1600 and 3x zoom specs are a bit more standard. Some of the best news here is the prices for these four cameras, ranging from the $500 LX2 ($100 cheaper than the initial LX1 pricetag) to $280 for the FX3. All four should be out some time this September. Keep reading for pics of the rest of the lineup.Read - DMC-LX2Read - DMC-FX50 & DMC-FX07Read - DMC-FX3

  • Panasonic's Lumix DMC-FZ7 reviewed

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    04.20.2006

    PC Magazine just laid-out a postivie review on Panasonic’s Lumix DMC-FZ7 six megapixel superzoom shooter. The reviewer fawned over the “excellent image” produced by this “very inexpensive” cam's “outstanding” VARIO-ELMARIT 12x optical zoom lens steadied by Panny’s MEGA Optical image stabilizer. The ability to shoot 640 x 480, 30fps video in both bright and low light with "little noise" was found to be “above average” -- especially in this price range. Yeah, there was some noticeable shutter lag and the non-articulating 2.5-inch LCD solarised when viewed from a sharp angle. Still, that didn’t stop PC Mag from slapping an Editor’s Choice, 4/5 rating on this $400ish $300ish cam when all was said and done.

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ1 reviewed

    by 
    Ryan Block
    Ryan Block
    04.02.2006

    The big company's little camera division that could has been doing it over and over for years now, and CNET Asia caught a preview of their new DMC-TZ1, the smallest 10x optical digital camera around. They seemed to find the 5 megapixel shooter's OIS and pixel binned 1600 ISO to be decent  (despite the expected exaggerated noise at higher ISOs, of course), and its travel functions useful -- though its unique folded optics design seemed to impair zoom-in time, and the TZ1's removable lens cap raised an eyebrow or two. CNET still seemed to find it "very good," though, so being that it's a straight up point and shoot, if you're cool going without manual camera functions this thing might just be in your future.[Via DP Blog]