Lumix

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  • Panasonic Lumix GF2 preview

    by 
    Vlad Savov
    Vlad Savov
    11.04.2010

    At first glance, sitting all on its lonesome like that, the GF2 might forgivably be perceived as just another mundanely incremental upgrade on what was already a lauded predecessor in the Lumix GF1. But, for once, our pessimism was not borne out by the facts -- far from it. With the GF2, Panasonic has somehow managed to shrink its smallest Micro Four Thirds shooter even further, by a reported 19 percent, and the difference in handling is tangible. The Japanese giant has also lightened the load by seven percent, thrown in a new touchscreen-centric UI, and, predictably, upped the video ante to 720/60p or 1080/60i recording in AVCHD format. Join us after the break to see what we thought of this delicious new recipe for pseudo-pocketable large-sensor shooting. Please note: Panasonic has not yet finalized the GF2's firmware, meaning that the sample images and video below may not necessarily be indicative of the quality you'll get from the final product.%Gallery-106778%%Gallery-106781%

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF2 now official: 12.1MP, Full HD movie mode

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    11.04.2010

    At long last, the Lumix DMC-GF2. Hitting the scene just a few weeks after the GH2, this here Micro Four Thirds rig is Panasonic's smallest and lightest interchangeable lens system camera, and it's packin' quite the specs list. From the top, you're looking at a 12.1 megapixel Live MOS sensor, compatibility with the company's own 3D interchangeable lens (the LUMIX G 12.5mm / F12) and an enclosure that's seven percent lighter (not to mention 19 percent smaller) than the GF1. You'll also find a three-inch touchpanel on the rear, contrast AF system, a freshly designed Touch Q user interface, internal dust reduction system and the ability to record video at 1920 x 1080/60i or 1280 x 720/60p in AVCHD. Better still, lower resolution options are available with Motion JPEG recording, and the 23-area focusing system shouldn't have a difficult time nailing your subject. We should point out that the ISO only ranges from 100 to 6400, but the included hot shoe accessory definitely allows for a flash. Of course, there's no optical viewfinder here, but hey, you can't have it all when you're looking to save space. The GF2 will ship in January with three color choices (silver, red and black) and two bundle options: a 14mm F2.5 pancake kit and a 14-42mm zoom lens kit. Unfortunately for you, pricing won't be announced until mid-to-late December. Bah, humbug! %Gallery-106670%

  • Panasonic's Lumix GF2 Micro Four Thirds camera spotted on billboard

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    11.03.2010

    Where there's smoke, right? Just days after hearing that Panasonic's newest Micro Four Thirds camera was on the way later this week, along comes this -- an event poster in Paris that leaves little doubt about what's to come. As the story goes, this shot was taken over in France, and it's detailing an event that'll actually take place tomorrow. If we had to guess, we'd say the world's smallest mirrorless camera kit will be officially unveiled within the next 24 hours. We mean, wouldn't you?

  • Panasonic Lumix Phone eyes-on (video)

    by 
    Ross Miller
    Ross Miller
    10.05.2010

    Right on schedule, Panasonic's 13.2 megapixel Lumix Phone made its physical debut buried within NTT DoCoMo's CEATEC booth. And by buried, we mean locked behind plexiglass and out of reach of our own hands. That didn't stop the light-capturing mechanics of our cameras, however. We're not sure where the "folding mechanism" mentioned in the press release comes from, but it looks to be a slider phone that keeps a numpad / text entry box out of view. Color options include black, pink, blue, and gold (though frankly, it looked more silver to us). Alas, that also means no chance to provide sample shots from the devices itself, but we do have a smattering of product photos from which you might derive glee -- and that aforementioned video after the break. %Gallery-104245%

  • Panasonic teases a 13.2MP 'Lumix phone' for October 5 unveiling

    by 
    Vlad Savov
    Vlad Savov
    10.01.2010

    Looks like we'll soon have another heavyweight to throw into the renewed cameraphone wars, as Panasonic has put up a teaser site for its first Lumix-branded phone. Lumix is of course Panasonic's camera label, which counts among its luminary membership the likes of the GF1 and the newly refreshed LX5. The new phone shooter promises to beat both in terms of pure resolution with its 13.2 megapixel CMOS sensor, which is accompanied by a 3.3-inch LCD atop a 146-gram body. Much like Nokia's N8 and its protruding sensor compartment, this Lumix handset will have to make room for its expanded imaging equipment, which is why it'll offer a comparatively chubby 17.7mm thickness, to go along with a 116mm height and 52mm width. We'll know more next week when CEATEC 2010 gets rolling over in Tokyo. [Thanks, Anton] P.S. -- It's also noteworthy that Panasonic's press release indicates a folding mechanism for this handset, which, given current trends in Japan, makes it most likely to be a clamshell device. It's also got some DLNA voodoo inside and is coming out by the end of this fiscal year (April 2011).

  • Lensbaby rolls out Composer with Tilt Transformer kit for Micro Four Thirds, Sony NEX cameras (hands-on)

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    09.23.2010

    We've already gotten our hands on Lensbaby's basic Composer lens, but the company has now gone and expanded its bag of tricks even further with its new Composer with Tilt Transformer kit. The key bit there is the Tilt Transformer (also available separately), which can also accommodate any Nikon mount lens and tilt it up to twice the amount of standard tilt-shift lenses. Have a Panasonic Lumix G Micro System or Olympus PEN Micro Four Thirds camera? Then you can get the kit now for $350 or just the Tilt Transformer for $250 -- Sony NEX camera users will have to wait until October 28th to get in on the act. Full press release is after the break, and our hands-on from the Photokina show floor is just below. Enjoy. %Gallery-103089%

  • Panasonic Lumix GH2 and 3D interchangeable lens hands-on

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    09.22.2010

    (function() { var s = document.createElement('SCRIPT'), s1 = document.getElementsByTagName('SCRIPT')[0]; s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = 'http://widgets.digg.com/buttons.js'; s1.parentNode.insertBefore(s, s1); })(); Digg To say the Micro Four Thirds / mirrorless battle is heating up would be understating things greatly. It's certainly the segment getting the most focus here at this year's Photokina, and with Panasonic cranking out yet another, we don't see any signs of it slowing down. The newfangled Lumix DMC-GH2 made its official debut yesterday, bringing with it an impressive list of specifications and compatibility with an oh-so-curious 3D lens that we peeked in prototype form back at IFA. When speaking to booth representatives here in Cologne, we learned that said lens will actually save both a 3D and 2D version of each picture you take, making it a far more viable option for someone who is just looking to test the 3D waters without giving up entirely on 2D. The camera itself felt sufficiently light, but it doesn't seem much more compact than the GH1 before it. And at $900, we've got our hearts set on a bona fide DSLR -- sorry, but it's true. Anywho, hit the gallery below if you're itching for a closer look at your maybe-possibly-probably next shooter (along with glimpses at the trio of lenses that were also revealed here at the show).%Gallery-103017%

  • Panasonic's $900 Lumix GH2 officially debuts: 16MP, 1080p movie mode, 3D interchangeable lens

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    09.21.2010

    Well, would you look at that? The rumor mill nailed it once more, and we couldn't be happier about it. Here at Photokina, Panasonic just removed the veil from its glistening Lumix GH2, a followup camera that looks to be worth every penny it'll cost you to upgrade. There's a 16 megapixel Live MOS sensor, SD / SDHC / SDXC memory card slot, Micro Four Thirds mount, 23 points of auto focus tracking, face detection and so, so much more. Like what, you ask? Like an ISO range from 160 to 12800, hot shoe accessory mount, 3-inch rear LCD, mini HDMI output, USB 2.0 connectivity, a 2.5mm remote / external microphone input and a 1080/60i movie mode. Read on for more... %Gallery-102870%

  • Leica quietly showcases D-Lux 5, redesigned X1 and rebranded DMC-FZ100

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    09.20.2010

    We're tucked away in Leica's high-brow design preview event here in Köln, and while it appears that the vast majority of those in attendance showed just to boast about their suit, we're strictly here for the gear. That being said, let us be the first to formally introduce you to the now-official D-Lux 5 rangefinder. Or, sort of official D-Lux 5. Unlike the M9 'Titanium' -- which the company spent a solid two hours boasting about -- the D-Lux 5 (a rebranded / tweaked LX5?) has been given nothing but a passing glance of affirmation, though we're anticipating a more formal release with specifications and the like tomorrow. Leica aficionados have likely been hearing whispers of this beaut for the past dozen months, but at long last, the unicorn has apparently transformed into a Gypsy Vanner. Though, still a mysterious one. In case that's not exactly your cup of million-dollar tea, it appears that Panasonic's DMC-FZ100 -- deemed the world's best megazoom by critics back in August -- has been reborn as a Leica, though the shell doesn't appear to have changed at all. Of course, we've seen Leica pull this rebranding trick before, but we're sure the so-called V-Lux 2M is far superior in some way that we've yet to be informed about. Rounding out the round of mystique is the gently refashioned X1, which was seen sporting a far more luxurious casing compared to the original. Feel free to drown yourself in the images below, and keep it locked right here for more as we hear it. %Gallery-102818% %Gallery-102820% %Gallery-102821%

  • Panasonic GH2 expected to have 16 megapixel sensor, maybe even 1080/60p video

    by 
    Vlad Savov
    Vlad Savov
    09.18.2010

    It was almost exactly a year ago that we asked you how you'd change the Panasonic GH1, and the consensus response was that the camera's biggest flaw was its stratospheric price. Well, Panasonic's about to help you out there, as it seems a GH2 successor is all but assured to debut at this year's Photokina exhibition, which is sure to put a little downward pressure on GH1 levies. The new shooter is rumored to be making mostly evolutionary upgrades, with 16 rather than 12 effective megapixels squeezed into its sensor, expanded ISO range up to 12,800, faster autofocus performance with the kit 14-140mm lens, 5fps burst shooting, and 1080/60i video recording at 24Mbps. Where things get interesting is the suggestion that the GH2 will be capable of 1080/60p, but that the AVCHD recording format -- whose current spec doesn't include 60 frames of 1080p goodness -- is forcing it to store data in the 60i mode. That'd be a pretty sweet new addition if true and we're inclined to believe it given the additional rumor of three processing cores inside the GH2. We'll know how much of this is legit by the middle of next week, Photokina isn't a place famed for keeping secrets -- quite the opposite, actually.

  • Lumix DMC-LX5 review roundup: great hardware for a not-so-great price

    by 
    Ross Miller
    Ross Miller
    09.06.2010

    Reviews are starting to trickle out for Pansonic's LX3 successor, the DMC-LX5, and so far they all seem to echo similar sentiment. The form factor hearkens back to its Micro Four Thirds darling GF1, at least from the top, with "dinky buttons" (in CNET UK's words) on the back reminding you of its point-and-shoot bloodline. The pictures are solid if not characteristically warm -- and the ability to simultaneously produce RAW and JPEG files is a nice touch -- as is the choice of either Motion JPEG or AVCHD Lite video. The universal issue with this camera is the price; that £449.99 tag (the equivalent of $691 in US currency) doesn't quite seem to match the offerings, especially when it's about on par with entry-level DSLRs with interchangeable lenses (albeit without the slim look). As PhotographyBLOG puts it, Panny's gotta hard case to make for a camera "that looks, at first glance to be very similar to a £299 model." Hey, a hardware switch for changing the aspect ratio (just above lens barrel; 4:3, 3:2, 16:9, or 1:1) doesn't come cheap. Much more detail can be found in the reviews below. Note: It's worth mentioning that this camera can be had for $500 at Amazon right now. Still pricey, but not $700 pricey. Read - PhotographyBLOG Read - CNET UK Read - Pocket-lint Read - Trusted Reviews

  • Panasonic's prototype Micro Four Thirds 3D lens and body arrive in Berlin

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    09.03.2010

    And here it is, Panasonic's prototype G-series micro-four-thirds shooter with new interchangeable 3D lens. We caught the pair hanging out at IFA with nary a soul around to take notice. Too bad for them, good for you if you've made the jump to a panny MFT as the lens will ultimately be compatible with your Lumix G micro system... probably -- unfortunately, Panasonic isn't saying which cams will be eligible for the software update. From the sound of it, the whole kit will get official in just a few week at Photokina with a new G-series body playing host to the new 3D lens. Here in Berlin, however, we've got a G2 body with an updated 3D image processing system doing the dirty work. Nevertheless, it was fully functional and produced a reasonable 3D image with plenty of pop that was ready to view on a brand new Panasonic 3D television. Come on, a 3D television is nothing without 3D content. Sneaky Panasonic, sneaky.%Gallery-101334%

  • Mirrorless camera shootout: DSLR alternatives get sized up and ISO-examined

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    08.17.2010

    It all started with Micro Four Thirds, but now just about everyone is jonesing to play along in the mirrorless camera game. The crew over at Serious Compacts managed to get ahold of quite a few contenders (Samsung's NX10, Sony's NEX5, Olympus' E-P2 and E-PL1, and Panasonic's GF1, GF2 and GH1), and rather than taking 'em apart one by one, they've decided to size 'em up in a fantastic size comparison piece. From lenses to bodies, all six cameras are shown from various angles, and even if you've convinced yourself to not be in the market for one of these bad boys, the eye candy alone is worth a peek. Furthermore, the group has been entered into a telling ISO comparison test, but if you came here looking for a spoiler, you'll be sorely disappointed. Tap those links below to get your study on, won'tcha?

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ100 reviewed: the best megazoom shooter your dough can buy

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    08.13.2010

    Panasonic and superzoom cameras go together like... well, like any two things that are undoubtedly meant to be together. The company has a history of outdoing itself time and time again when it comes to enlarged point-and-shoots with atypically long zooms, and the all-new DMC-FX100 is most certainly not bucking the trend. Announced just a few weeks back, this here Lumix carries a 24x optical zoom, 11fps burst mode, 1080p movie recording and a 14 megapixel sensor. The gurus over at PhotographyBLOG have been testing its every feature for the past few days, and they drew some rather positive conclusions. Confessing that the FZ38 was a hard act to follow, they still felt that the FZ100 managed to top even that, with the only real (expected) knock being the noise that made itself too evident once you pushed beyond the ISO 400 mark. They also felt that the $499.95 asking price was a bit on the high side, but now that Panny's building somewhat of a reputation in this space, we guess it's entitled to try and take advantage. Hit the source link for the fully skinny, but don't even bother if you're hoping for someone to talk you out of pulling the trigger.

  • Engadget's back to school guide: Digital cameras

    by 
    Vlad Savov
    Vlad Savov
    08.04.2010

    Welcome to Engadget's Back to School guide! We know that this time of year can be pretty annoying and stressful for everyone, so we're here to help out with the heartbreaking process of gadget buying for the school-aged crowd. Today, we've got our optical viewfinders set firmly on digital cameras -- and you can head to the Back to School hub to see the rest of the product guides as they're added throughout the month. Be sure to keep checking back -- at the end of the month we'll be giving away a ton of the gear featured in our guides -- and hit up the hub page right here! Time for us to open up chapter two of this year's Back to School advice compendium. Up for discussion today are digital cameras, which have been in the gym all year working on their processing prowess and return today with 720p HD video as an almost standard feature. We've got a good cross-section of young pretenders and finely aged veterans for your perusal, so why not give your mouse a little exercise as well and click past the break?

  • Panasonic will offer interchangeable 3D lens for Micro Four Thirds by year's end

    by 
    Sean Hollister
    Sean Hollister
    07.27.2010

    Like Panasonic's new 3D-capable HDC-SDT750 camcorder but don't want to shell out $1,400 for a brand-new kit? Get a load of this Micro Four Thirds lens. That's right, Panny's just announced an interchangeable 3D lens that affixes to the standard Lumix G-series mount, meaning any of the company's new sub-DSLR shooters could see in stereo with a firmware hack update. Sadly, compatible models are still "to be announced" and even the lens pictured above is just a prototype, but we won't have too long to wait for the real deal -- the Japanese manufacturer says it'll be on sale by the end of the year. Press release after the break.

  • Engadget Podcast 206 - 07.24.2010

    by 
    Trent Wolbe
    Trent Wolbe
    07.24.2010

    This is an incredibly well-rounded and insightful double podcast. It is so well-rounded and insightful that it looks like it might turn into a triple podcast and is, quite frankly, the best podcast the Engadget Podcasters have ever seen. Hosts: Joshua Topolsky, Nilay Patel, Paul MillerProducer: Trent WolbeMusic: Double Rainbow 00:02:33 - Panasonic's new Lumix lineup: LX5, FZ40, FZ100, FX700, and TS10 all official00:06:52 - Canon developing smaller DSLRs to compete with mirrorless cameras?00:07:00 - Nikon planning "new concept" mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras with enhanced video modes00:21:12 - New Xbox 360 4GB ships August 3rd for $199, Kinect standalone priced at $149, bundle coming this holiday for $29900:30:48 - webOS 2.0 coming 'later this year,' says HP's Rubinstein00:30:58 - HP Slate no longer a consumer product, will arrive for enterprise this fall00:31:24 - HP files for 'PalmPad' trademark -- a webOS tablet, perhaps?00:31:35 - HP Slate 500 with Windows 7 surfaces on HP's site00:31:54 - HP confirms that Slate is still kicking, 'next steps' being determined00:41:52 - HP CEO: Palm could end up a 'sub-brand' of the company00:46:41 - Samsung Galaxy S review shootout: Captivate for AT&T and Vibrant for T-Mobile00:48:14 - Dell Streak review redux: thoughts from the New World00:48:41 - Nexus One is sold out in Google's store -- forever00:56:32 - Motorola mini Droid slider caught by Mr. Blurrycam00:59:07 - Droid 2 being prepared for launch, set to arrive August 23rd?01:00:29 - Apple posts record $3.25b profit in first full quarter of iPad sales, says more 'amazing products' coming this year01:00:48 - Apple begins iPhone 4 Case Program: apply for your free case or Bumper now01:01:26 - Apple delays white iPhone a second time, won't ship until 'later this year'01:03:08 - Apple starts refunding Bumper purchases automagically01:07:45 - AT&T announces 26 percent earnings growth for Q2, $4b profit01:16:28 - Droid X users gobbling up 5x the data of other Verizon smartphones01:18:00 - Microsoft reports $4.5b in profit, a record $16.04b in revenue01:18:30 - Steve Ballmer feeling pressure at Microsoft for stagnating share price?01:18:48 - Kin listed as at least $240 million writeoff in Microsoft earnings report01:21:44 - Microsoft to employees: 'everybody gets a Windows Phone 7!'01:21:50 - Microsoft wants employees to code Windows Phone 7 apps 'in their spare time'Hear the podcastSubscribe to the podcast[iTunes] Subscribe to the Podcast directly in iTunes (enhanced AAC).[RSS MP3] Add the Engadget Podcast feed (in MP3) to your RSS aggregator and have the show delivered automatically.[RSS AAC] Add the Engadget Podcast feed (in enhanced AAC) to your RSS aggregator.[Zune] Subscribe to the Podcast directly in the Zune MarketplaceDownload the podcastLISTEN (MP3)LISTEN (AAC)LISTEN (OGG)Contact the podcast1-888-ENGADGET or podcast (at) engadget (dot) com.Twitter: @joshuatopolsky @futurepaul @reckless @engadget

  • Panasonic's new Lumix lineup: LX5, FZ40, FZ100, FX700, and TS10 all official

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    07.21.2010

    You ready to get Lumix'd to the max? Panasonic has five new point-and-shooters prepped for this fall, headlined by the well-leaked LX5. That camera aims to keep what was good about the stylish, high-end LX3 while pushing image quality up a notch, with better image processing and a better lens in front of the same 10.1 megapixel CCD resulting in better low light performance. There's also HD recording in AVCHD Lite at 720p. The FZ40 and FZ100 super zoomers are very similar in their 24x zoom lenses and 14.1 megapixels, but the latter can record 1080p and pull off some high speed burst shooting, while the former is constrained to 720p. The FX700 fulfills the stereotypical role of a "safe" 5x zoom point and shoot, though it scores 1080p recording in addition to the needlessly high-res, looks-good-on-a-Costco-placard 14.1 megapixel stills. Finally, the TS10 brings up the low-end, with a rugged design and that good old 14.1 megapixel resolution. Its 4x zoom and 720p motion JPEG recording make it the oddball of the bunch, but it's waterproof down to 10 feet, shock and dust proof, and a good bit cheaper to boot. The TS10 will be out in September for $249, while the LX5, FZ40, FZ100, and FX700 will be out in August for $499, $399, $499, and $399, respectively. Press releases are after the break. %Gallery-97886% %Gallery-97888%

  • Panasonic Lumix LX5 outed by tech support page, improvements are black and white

    by 
    Sean Hollister
    Sean Hollister
    07.17.2010

    Panasonic may be pushing Micro Four Thirds tech these days, but that doesn't mean it's forgotten about the pocketable high-end -- in fact, full spec sheets and pictures have just leaked from the company's technical support website, detailing the unannounced latest in the Lumix LX lineup. The 10.1 megapixel DMC-LX5 doesn't have any revolutionary new features, sadly, but it certainly brings the 2008 LX3 predecessor up to spec in nearly every way, with a longer 3.8x optical zoom lens by Leica, 12,800 ISO mixed-pixel sensitivity and a familiar-sounding AVCHD Lite 720p video recording mode. Slightly heavier due to a larger 1250mAh battery, the camera supports SDXC memory cards this time round, has an anti-glare coating on the 3-inch LCD and thankfully replaces those bulky breakout component cables with a mini-HDMI out. There's also an optional electronic viewfinder and a jog dial on the back, but we don't want to ruin all your fun unearthing these gems; peruse the specs yourself at our source link.

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 reviewed, premium features warrant its premium price

    by 
    Tim Stevens
    Tim Stevens
    07.09.2010

    Another entrant has entered the Micro Four Thirds ring, and it's Panasonic delivering the Lumix DMC-G2 -- a new shooter with similar still performance but, this time, some rather nice enhancements, the most major being a three-inch articulating touchscreen. You can control some aspects of the camera with a touch, perhaps most useful being tap-to-focus augmented by the camera keeping focus on whatever you tapped on, even if it moves around. But, a full suite of physical buttons and dials still await your fingers, enabling you to tweak settings without fiddling with menus. The 720p video recording now supports AVCHD, giving your SDHC or SDXC memory card a break, and there's an input for an optional stereo mic. Ultimately still performance here is said to be identical to Panasonic's more budget-minded DMC-G10, which clocks in $200 cheaper than the G2's MSRP of $799, but lacks 720p video and the fancy touchscreen. Worth the extra cost? That depends on how deep your pockets are. Update: DP Review has its review up as well.