Lumix

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  • Panasonic announces Lumix DMC-3D1: dual lenses, 12 megapixel sensors

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    11.07.2011

    Do you shoot 3D photos? Nope, neither do we, but Panasonic certainly seems to hope that'll change -- perhaps even as soon as next month, when its Lumix 3D1 hits store shelves... for $500. And how much camera does half a grand buy you? Well, for starters you get not one, but a pair of 25-100mm optical zoom lenses (30-120mm in 3D mode), pumping images to dual 12.1 megapixel 1/2.3-inch sensors. Two lenses and two sensors make this pocket wonder a natural at stereoscopic 3D video, but it can also pull some pretty clever tricks with still photos. Sure, you can shoot full-res stills and 1080i video simultaneously, but those dual zoom lenses can operate independently as well, letting you snap pics and/or video at multiple focal lengths -- capture a wide-angle shot with one lens and a close-up with the other, for example. Panasonic wasn't able to demo this functionality during our briefing, so we can't speak to the interface, but it certainly sounds like a nifty concept. Beyond that, expect up to 8 fps burst at full resolution, a 3.5-inch touchscreen and "dramatically clear" low-light images, even at high-ISOs (according to Panasonic). Ready to hear more from the camera maker? Jump past the break for the full PR.%Gallery-138520%

  • Panasonic Lumix GX1 Micro Four Thirds camera surfaces in leaked photos

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    10.31.2011

    Panasonic just launched a whole new series of Micro Four Thirds lenses a couple of months ago, and it looks like it might soon also have a new Micro Four Thirds camera to take advantage of them. That photo you see above recently turned up on the Mobile01 forums with a bundle of others, showing a hereto unannounced Panasonic Lumix GX1 MFT camera, which looks like it could be a true successor to the GF1 (as opposed to the GF2 and GF3 that moved in a less pro-minded direction). Rumored specs remain a bit light, but the camera apparently has a touchscreen display 'round back, which will likely see a fair bit of use unless you opt for an external EVF. It's also suggested that the camera will be launching soon -- on November 8th -- although that's obviously yet to be confirmed. [Thanks, Amin]

  • Panasonic Lumix FX90 point-and-shoot packs built-in WiFi, Android / iPhone app compatibility

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    08.26.2011

    For many photographers, in-camera WiFi may be an attractive feature before you leave the store, but confusing setup and limited functionality reduce its appeal once you actually go and try to use it. Panasonic sets out to better take advantage of wireless connectivity with its Lumix FX90, adding Android and iPhone app support for transferring pictures and video directly to a mobile device, then uploading them to Lumix Club -- a cloud-based photo-sharing service -- and on to Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, etc. You can also share photos directly from the camera -- a dedicated WiFi button launches a menu prompting you to select a sharing service -- but app support brings the added benefit of your phone's data connection. Beyond those new wireless features, the FX90 includes a 12 megapixel CCD sensor, 5x, 24-120mm optical zoom lens, 3-inch touchscreen, and 1080i AVCHD video capture. The FX90 will ship this fall with pricing yet to be announced, but jump past the break for the full rundown from Panasonic in the meantime.%Gallery-131062%

  • Panasonic Lumix FZ150 builds on FZ47 superzoom, adds CMOS sensor, 1080p video

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    08.26.2011

    Last month, Panasonic's Lumix FZ47 made some (rather subtle) waves with its full manual video mode, lettering you control aperture and shutter speed while capturing in 1080i. Now, the company just announced its higher-end FZ150, which replaces last year's FZ100, adding 1080p AVCHD capture, a stereo mic with noise cancellation, and a 12 fps burst mode. Image-related improvements include a 12.1 megapixel CMOS sensor, 25-600mm (24x) f/2.8-5.2 Leica lens with nano surface coating, faster autofocus, a new Venus Engine FHD Pro processor, and sensitivity up to ISO 3200. The FZ150 retains its predecessor's 3-inch LCD and 0.2-inch EVF -- both also present on the FZ47. There's also a new side-lever control, letting you adjust zoom and focus with secondary levers positioned just to the left of the lens. Panasonic's latest superzoom cam will ship in late September with a $500 sticker price. PR after the break.%Gallery-131061%

  • Panasonic shrinks its Micro Four Thirds lenses, launches X-series with wide-angle, telephoto zooms

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    08.26.2011

    Anyone who's used Panasonic's 14-42mm Micro Four Thirds zoom lens has probably noticed its relatively bulky design, especially when compared to Olympus's counterpart. Today, the company announced a new lens that offers the same zoom and f/3.5-5.6 aperture range in a housing less than half the size when closed, and still noticeably smaller when extended. The first of two optics in Panasonic's premium X-series -- the second is a 45-170mm f/4-5.6 zoom -- it's been billed as the world's smallest digital interchangeable power zoom lens, thanks to its internal zoom motor which lets you adjust the focal length using a side-mounted rocker -- the design is similar to the zoom toggle included with the company's new FX150 superzoom. Priced at $399, it also includes a metal lens mount, instead of the plastic mount used with the existing $199 14-42mm lens. That second 45-170mm zoom ($449) can replace Panasonic's 45-200mm lens ($349), and while the size difference isn't as dramatic is its smaller X-series sibling, it's still noticeably smaller and lighter. Both lenses include optical image stabilization and feature nano surface coatings, designed to reduce ghosting and lens flare. The 14-42mm lens will ship in October in black and white (for use with silver bodies), and the 45-170mm zoom will ship in September. They'll only be compatible with the GF-2, GF-3, and G3 at launch after downloading a firmware update -- Panasonic is leaving it up to Olympus to release supporting firmware for its own cameras be compatible with all G-series cameras at launch, without the need for a firmware update. Jump past the break for more details from Panasonic, and check out the gallery below -- complete with side-by-side shots for both lens classes.%Gallery-131060% Update: Panasonic issued a correction saying that both lens will be compatible with all G-series cameras without the need for a firmware update.

  • Panasonic GF3 reviewed: aging 12 MP sensor, good upgrade for current compact users

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    08.12.2011

    When the Lumix GF1 was released less than a year after Micro Four Thirds first made its debut, it made a huge splash for its size, image quality, and versatility. Problem is, Panasonic set the bar very high for future GF-series models, and has sadly come up short with its latest update, positioning the GF3 ($600 with 14-42mm kit lens) as an upgrade for compact camera owners while leaving enthusiasts longing for much more. DPReview took the GF3 to task, publishing a very comprehensive review while finding that while Panasonic's latest ILC is a good fit for some photographers, more advanced users will likely be disappointed -- especially if they're expecting a rangefinder-like successor to the GF1. We spent a few hours with a pre-production GF3 earlier this summer, and weren't blown away by its performance. When testing against the class-leading Sony NEX-C3, we found the Sony camera to offer faster focusing, better high-ISO performance, more accurate white balance, and better image quality overall. So unless you're really gunning to save 50 bucks on an ILC with a kit zoom (or you already have a collection of Micro Four Thirds lenses), the $650 C3 is definitely the better bet.

  • Panasonic Lumix GF3: sample photos and video

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    06.29.2011

    We already gave you some hands-on impressions of Panasonic's new Lumix GF3, but we just had a chance to shoot video and stills with the Micro Four Thirds cam at an event in NYC, leaving with a couple hundred photos and a small handful of video clips. There's no question that this GF2 successor was designed with interchangeable lens camera (ILC) newbies in mind, with no dedicated mode dial, a touchscreen display, and a boatload of auto settings, along with the usual spattering of effects modes. Panasonic chose a mock wedding scene as the centerpiece of its demo today, complete with bride, groom, and celebrity cake designer (a rather enthusiastic Ron Ben-Israel). Weddings mean colorful flowers, well-dressed subjects, and food -- but also dim lighting and chaos -- a perfect environment for showing off a camera's strengths shooting in low-light, assuming it can actually deliver. The GF3 probably won't be the camera of choice for our next celebration, however.%Gallery-127453% First up was a balcony shot with bride and groom. As expected, the backlit scene presented an incredible challenge for the GF3, which had trouble focusing and compensating exposure to properly light our subjects -- even the professional wedding photographer on hand had difficulty focusing his GF3 at times. The position-adjustable flash allowed us to light our subjects at an angle, or to bounce light off the ceiling, which didn't seem to work well in the cavernous room. As we progressed through the morning, additional scenes highlighted new shortcomings. Jump past the break for a sample video and more impressions, or check out the gallery above for sample images -- the first four shots highlight different positions with the adjustable flash.

  • Panasonic Lumix GF3 official: 12.1 MP, 1080i video, no hot shoe in sight (hands-on)

    by 
    Dana Wollman
    Dana Wollman
    06.13.2011

    Last week, we caught a glimpse of the Lumix DMC-GF3, a new addition to Panasonic's ever-growing family of Micro Four Thirds shooters. Turns out, the camera we spied in that YouTube video was legit: the company just made it official and yes, it's missing a hot shoe. Available in four colors with 12.1 megapixel resolution, it uses Panny's latest imaging processor, shoots 1080i AVCHD video, and has a 3-inch touchscreen, ISO range of 160 to 6400, and the usual array of intelligent Auto enhancements. Unlike the GF2 -- which isn't going anywhere, by the way -- it's designed with the greenest of novices in mind, which means it forgoes things experienced photogs might like, such as a hot shoe and viewfinder. This one has a mono, not stereo mic, and swaps in a simple scroll wheel on the back side. Panasonic also rejiggered the touch UI to make certain settings easier to find and added a miniature art filter -- already a staple on Olympus' PEN series. Oh, and as a beginner-friendly camera, it looks more like a point-and-shoot than a DSLR -- it's 15 percent lighter than the GF2, and 17 percent smaller. The GF3 will be available in July for $699 with a 14mm lens, to be followed in late August by a $599 kit that comes with a 14-42mm lens. In the meantime, head on past the break and check out our impressions after spending a few minutes with a not-final unit and a 14mm lens. We only got to play with it in a fluorescent conference room, alas, but hopefully our handful of test shots will give you a taste of what you can do with the depth of field should you spring for the higher-end of the two kits. %Gallery-126203% %Gallery-126204%

  • NTT DoCoMo announces 24 new mobile wonders (yes, really) to flood its network

    by 
    Zachary Lutz
    Zachary Lutz
    05.21.2011

    So, Japan... want a new mobile device? How about 24? This grandiose announcement comes straight from NTT DoCoMo, which commonly lays its cards on the table for the delight of consumers. Among the selection you'll find eight new Gingerbread phones, six incredibly high-res shooters (ranging between 12.2 and 16.3 megapixels), eight waterproof handsets, and one embedded with Swarovski crystals. We're particularly thrilled to see the mighty Galaxy S II, 3D-capturing Aquos SH-12C, 700-nit Optimus Bright (contrastingly-named but nearly identical to the Optimus Black), ultra-slim MEDIAS WP N-06C, and mobile payment-enabled Xperia Acro. Oh, and don't forget about the LOOX F-07C -- a multi-talented handset that's running Symbian and Windows 7 Home Premium -- while two LTE-enabled WiFi routers are sneaking into DoCoMo's party, too. That's a lot to absorb, so check out the source for individual release timeframes, which begin now and continue through August -- or just check out the PR after the break.

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3 leaked, expected to launch tomorrow

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    05.11.2011

    Panasonic is rumored to be launching the Lumix DMC-G3 tomorrow, the update to its Micro Four Thirds G2. According to 43 Rumors, the new cam will be 25 percent smaller than its predecessor, and will include a 15.8 megapixel sensor and a 3-inch articulating LCD. Overall, the camera appears to have a very similar form factor to the G2, but scraps the left dial, presumably shifting those controls to the touch-enabled display. The site lists the launch rumor at its highest accuracy level (think DHS threat levels, but for camera rumors), so they're pretty sure we'll have all the details come tomorrow morning.

  • Panasonic Lumix GH2 review roundup: impressive video recording, murky still images

    by 
    Richard Lai
    Richard Lai
    03.27.2011

    In case you're still wondering if Panasonic's mirrorless Lumix GH2 is worth your $900, we've rounded up a handful of reviews to provide a pointer for your next big purchase. While most reviewers agree that this Micro Four Thirds camera appears to be very similar to its predecessor, they universally praise the subtly improved ergonomics, speedy liveview autofocusing, and refined image quality, especially with its 1080p AVCHD video recording (although Digital Camera Resource Page did notice some artifacting in its clips). Noise is also a non-issue up to about ISO 800 or 1600, though it's apparent that the 16 megapixel stills are comparatively dull and, like those from many other MFTs, aren't quite on par with DSLRs -- expect plenty of manual processing work here, as demoed by the good folks over at Digital Photography Review. All in all, the GH2 is a great kit for high quality video capturing, bundled with a pretty good still performance that requires some extra TLC afterwards -- kinda ironic in a way, but hey, this isn't a problem for lovers of video bokeh. Head over to the links below for some in-depth analysis and walk-through before you leave a small dent on your bank account. Read - Digital Photography Review Read - Photography Blog Read - Camera Labs Read - Digital Camera Resource Page Read - Let's Go Digital

  • Panasonic GF2 crashes the Engadget reader meetup, collects a gallery of memories / sample images

    by 
    Vlad Savov
    Vlad Savov
    03.01.2011

    Our reader meetup this past Friday in San Francisco was infiltrated by a somewhat unusual assailant, Panasonic's GF2 Micro Four Thirds shooter. Sporting a new, significantly thinner, pancake lens primed at 14mm with a maximum F2.5 aperture, this eminently portable camera managed to sneak into the building while concealed inside one of our editors' jacket pockets. As we've said before, the major difference between the GF2 and the GF1 for us is that the new model really feels like a compact point-and-shoot, to the point of making us forget that it has a DSLR-sized sensor within it. We've put together the following galleries, which were mostly shot in the fully automatic mode, to give you a taste of how Panasonic's latest handles the challenges of a poorly lit nighttime scene, on the one hand, and a gorgeous sunny day, on the other. Enjoy! %Gallery-117921% %Gallery-117923%

  • How would you change Panasonic's Lumix DFC-GF2?

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    02.25.2011

    We're drowning in interchangeable lens options, but that's far from being a bad thing. For those that finally caved and picked up Panasonic's Lumix DFC-GF2, we're interested to see how you'd change things if given that golden opportunity. Are you satisfied with the size, weight and design? How's the low-light performance? Would you alter anything about the lens selection? Introduce a version that changes colors with the seasons? Go on and get creative in comments below -- the GF3 needs some ideas, you know?

  • Panasonic announces Lumix GF2 pricing and availability, plenty of other models too

    by 
    Tim Stevens
    Tim Stevens
    02.01.2011

    Today is the day that budget-minded Panasonic lovers have been waiting for, when the company finally announces what it's going to charge domestically for the Lumix GF2 and a suite of other models it's announced in the past months. The Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens GF2 will ship this month for an MSRP of $499.95, body alone. If you want the new 14 - 42mm GF2K lens you'll be looking at $599.95, the 14mm prime GF2C lens will cost $699.95, while the 12.5mm/F12 Lumix G, which captures pictures in 3D, is a relative bargain at $259.95. Pansonic also unleashed a flurry of MSRPs for other Lumix compact models unveiled at CES, with the FP5 and FP7 costing $200 and $230 respectively, the FH2 and FH5 priced at $140 and $150. More details and numbers in the pair of PR after the break.

  • Panasonic unleashes Lumix ZS10, ZS8, FX78, and TS3 point-and-shoot cameras

    by 
    Joanna Stern
    Joanna Stern
    01.25.2011

    Thought Panasonic was done unleashing Lumix point-and-shoots for a bit? Us too, but apparently the compact cam fun isn't over yet. Yep, in addition to the eight it released earlier this month at CES, the company has four new ones for your eyes only tonight. Naturally, we've got all the important details and few glossy shots below. Oh, and if that's not enough for ya, you can always hit the break for the full press releases. Up first are two new powerful shooters joining the ZS family: the DMC-ZS10 and DMC-ZS8. Like the previous ZS cams, the 14.1 megapixel ZS10 has a 24mm ultra-wide-angle and 16x optical zoom Leica lens, records 1080p video, and sports a three-inch touch LCD. The specs certainly impress, but Panny's also hoping you take its 3D Photo mode seriously -- the setting can produce a "realistic 3D photo" by taking 20 consecutive shots and overlaying the best two. Naturally, the images can be viewed on any of the Viera 3DTVs. The ZS8 sports most of the same specs, but cuts it down to just 720p recording. No word on the pricing on these two, but they should be hitting shelves in March. Like its FX75 brother, the DMC-FX78 is all about Full HD. Packing a Leica 24mm wide-angle lens, the 12.1 megapixel FX78 can record full 1920 x 1080-resolution video in AVCHD. But beyond the recording specs, Panasonic has improved its 3.5-inch Smart Touchscreen, which basically allows you to control all the cam's functions -- autofocus, zooming, playback, etc. -- with, well you know, just a touch. Like the ZS cams, the FX includes the 3D Photo mode. As you may have guessed, no pricing yet on this bad boy, but it will come in black, gold, and white in March. Last but not least is the rugged TS3. Like the DMC-TS1, the 12.1 megapixel shooter is completely waterproof, not to mention shockproof, freezeproof, and dustproof. Yep, it's as proofed as they come, and throw in the fact that it packs a compass, altimeter, and barometer and you pretty much can swap this thing out for a ton of other gear. As an actual camera, the TS3 doesn't sound too shabby either -- it can record 1080p video, packs a 3D mode, and boasts a 28mm wide-angle Leica lens. Nope, no pricing, but it'll join the others in March. %Gallery-115010% %Gallery-115009%

  • Panasonic debuts Lumix FP5, FP7, FH5 and FH2 ultraslim compact cameras

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    01.05.2011

    It ain't Photokina, and it ain't PMA, but darn if the cameras aren't rolling out left and right here at the 2011 edition of CES. This evening, it's Panasonic's turn, and we've got four new Lumix point-and-shoots to discuss in more detail below: For starters, we've got a pair of newcomers to the Lumix FH series, the FH5 and FH2. Both of these are sporting sleek, svelte exteriors, with the DMC-FH5 nabbing a 16 megapixel sensor and the DMC-FH2 stepping down to 14 megapixels. Both of 'em feature a newly-developed retractable 28mm wide-angle lens, a 4x optical zoom and a 720p movie mode. You'll also find a newly-incorporated Venue Engine VI, which hastens startup and overall reaction times. Mega optical image stabilization, face detection and an intelligent scene selector are all included, as is the Lumix Image Uploader to get your shots up onto the web, STAT. Pricing on this duo is expected at a later date, though we are told that the FH5 will ship in silver, violet, black and gold, while the FH2 dons black, red, pink and blue outfits. Looking for something with a bit more pizazz? The ultrathin FP series is growing by two today as well, with the 16.1 megapixel DMC-FP7 and 14.1 megapixel DMC-FP5 offering up a sexy exterior, 4x optical zoom and a 720p movie mode. The FP7 goes with a mirror-like finish, while the FP5 sticks with matte. The FP7 (shown above) also has a nicer-than-average rear, with a 3.5-inch LCD; the FP5 steps it down ever-so-slightly to a 3.0-incher. Both models include Smart Touch Screens that enable shooters to tweak lots of settings within hitting a single physical button, and the FP7 goes one step further by offering one-touch re-touching. The duo also incorporates Panny's Venus Engine VI, mega optical image stabilization, face detection, an intelligent scene selector and a dedicated iA button. Pricing remains a mystery for these as well, but you can decide between red, blue and black on the FP7 or black, pink, silver and blue on the FP5. %Gallery-112599% %Gallery-112598%

  • Panasonic intros Lumix DMC-S3, DMC-S1, DMC-FH25 and DMC-FH27 compact cameras

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    01.05.2011

    More Lumix goodness? You betcha. Hot on the heels of Panasonic's CES unveiling of the FP5, FP7, FH5 and FH2 ultraslim compact camera comes this: even more Lumix compacts. Per usual, we'll tell you exactly what you need to know below, and those hungry for more can peek the full releases after the break. Up first we have two new folks joining the S series: the DMC-S3 and DMC-S1. Both of these are designed for up-and-comers looking for ease of use, with the S3 having a 14.1 megapixel sensor and the S1 dipping to a 12.1 megapixel sensor. Both of 'em tout a 720p movie mode, refreshed designs and a 4x optical zoom lens. Panny admits that they're both "entry-level," though you'll still find optical image stabilization, face detection, an intelligent scene selector and the Venus Engine VI image processor. There's a 2.7-inch LCD on the rear of each unit, and while the S3 will ship in blue, red, black and violet, the S1 will arrive in black, gold, blue, pink and silver. Mum's the word on a price and release date, sadly. The DMC-FH27 and DMC-FH25 point-and-shoots are both aimed at the fashionistas in the crowd, with the pair touting a 16.1 megapixel sensor, 8x optical zoom lens and a 720p movie mode. There's also an advanced Intelligent Auto mode for those who detest fiddling with settings, and the Venus Engine VI image processor promises to speed up just about everything dealing with operation. Face detection, optical image stabilization and an intelligent scene selector are all present, though the FH27's 3-inch rear LCD one-ups the 2.7-inch panel that's on the FH25. Per usual, Panny's keeping its trap shut when it comes to a price and release date. %Gallery-112601% %Gallery-112598%

  • Panasonic's Lumix GH2 now shipping in America

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    12.22.2010

    It's not exactly November, but those who pre-ordered early may still end up with a Lumix GH2 beneath their tree. The highly-anticipated GH1 followup -- which was introduced back at Photokina -- has officially begun to ship to end users in the US of A. The official order page shows a one to two week wait, but we've confirmed with Panny itself (as well as tipster Nate, the proud owner of the one above) that units are indeed trickling out as we speak. For those in need of a refresher, this Micro Four Thirds shooter packs a 16 megapixel sensor, 1080p movie mode, SDXC support and an ISO range from 160 to 12,800. Feel free to take a peek back at our hands-on from Germany, and make sure you cancel those holiday plans STAT -- wouldn't want this sitting on your doorstep for a solid week, now would you? [Thanks, Nate]

  • Panasonic GF2 shipping December 3rd in Japan, turning gringos green with envy

    by 
    Vlad Savov
    Vlad Savov
    11.18.2010

    As far as we know, the western hemisphere should still have the mirrorless GF2 from Panasonic penciled in on its January 2011 must-own list, but Japan is (predictably) getting the party started a little early. Panny has shot out a brief statement this morning to say that its home nation will receive the GF2 -- alternately attired in red, white or black -- on the 3rd of December. That's a good couple of weeks before we expected to even have pricing for North America and Europe, leaving the rest of us to just pout and stare at the calendar with disdain. And if pricing is what you need, Impress has some of its usually deadly accurate estimates to offer you, with the GF2 body set to cost ¥60,000 (about $720) by itself, ¥80,000 with the F2.5 14mm pancake kit lens, or ¥90,000 if paired with the 14-42mm glass. We'd advise not taking straight currency conversions as indicators of pricing anywhere outside Japan, however, due to the atypically high value of the yen at the moment. Wistful sighs, on the other hand, are free everywhere.

  • Panasonic Lumix GF2 vs. GF1... fight!

    by 
    Vlad Savov
    Vlad Savov
    11.05.2010

    If yesterday's preview of the GF2 wasn't enough for you, here's a little more eye candy to feast upon. We paired up Panasonic's all-new Micro Four Thirds shooter with the GF1 that preceded it and collected a nice little gallery for your perusal below. The major difference between the two is in their dimensions -- the GF2 feels a lot closer to your typical compact camera -- though there are plenty of smaller modifications as well, such as the refashioned grip on the camera's right side, the replacement of the jog dial up top with a stereo mic array, and the introduction of a luminous iA button for switching on the intelligent auto mode. The back of the GF2 is also quite a bit tidier, which has been achieved mostly by eliminating some buttons in favor of the touchscreen interface. Check it all out below or jump past the break for some video action. %Gallery-106820%