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  • Panasonic Lumix GF6 passes through Taiwan certification with WiFi

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    04.03.2013

    Panasonic's support for WiFi in its Micro Four Thirds cameras has so far skewed toward the high end. Thanks to a new filing at Taiwan's National Communications Commission, though, we know the entry level should be covered as well. The regulator has been looking at a DMC-GF6 camera with with built-in WiFi, hinting that the Lumix GF5's sequel will make networking one of its centerpiece upgrades. Other clues aren't quite as forthcoming -- there's nothing imaging-related at the NCC, so we don't know if the GF6 is an optical revolution or another subtle refresh. It's mostly safe to presume that Panasonic will watch out for celebrity leaks this time around.

  • Panasonic's new Lumix and camcorder lineup arrives at CES

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    01.07.2013

    Panasonic may not have dedicated much time to its 2013 Lumix and WiFi camcorder lineup in its CES 2013 press conference, but we're going to break it down for you. The HC-X920, HC-V720 and HC-V520 comes with built-in Wifi, a level shot function and real-time broadcasting, letting you relay the images straight to a smartphone. The HC-V210 and V210M have 72x optical zoom, optical image stabilization and a F/1.8 lens. On the Lumix side, it's announcing the Lumix DMC-TS5, a ruggedized model with a 16.1 megapixel sensor that can dive to depths of 43 feet and is shockproof from a height of 6.6 feet. The LZ30 bridge camera has a 35x optical zoom and a 35mm lens The XS1 has a 14mm thick body and a 14.-4 megapixel sensor. The ZS30 has an 18.1-megapixel sensor, 20x optical Zoom and integrated WiFi and NFC. The company is also shuttling out a GoPro rival in the form of the HX-A100 wearable HD camcorder, which we'll try to get our greasy mitts upon to show you more. Follow all the latest CES 2013 news at our event hub.

  • Panasonic Lumix GH3 launches on December 13th, but pricing remains a mystery

    by 
    Mat Smith
    Mat Smith
    10.25.2012

    Panasonic's forthcoming mirror-less multimedia wonder has been given a release date. Yep, the Lumix GH3, with its 'unlimited recording time' and magnesium alloy build, will arrive in the Land of the Rising Sun just over a month from now. While the Japanese press release doesn't specify pricing, you can expect this Lumix to arrive in body-only and two lens kit variants, one with a 12-35mm f/2.8 zoom lens, and another with a f/4.0 - 5.8 rig. Behind those optic options (not to mention the ability to capture 72Mbps 60p video), you'll be getting a 16-megapixel sensor, splash-proof shell and a flip-out OLED touchscreen alongside a 614K-dot viewfinder. If that leaked video sample piqued your interest, check out the full spec rundown at the source below.

  • Panasonic's GH3 mirrorless camera gets official: 16MP, WiFi and 72Mbps HD video in a ruggedized body (hands-on)

    by 
    Joe Pollicino
    Joe Pollicino
    09.17.2012

    It's not a secret in the least thanks to a video slip-up by Panasonic a few days ago, but today the company is ready to officially announce the successor to its venerable GH2, the Lumix DMC-GH3. This Micro-Four Thirds mirrorless shooter is nearly as big as some entry-level DSLRs, but it's loaded with features to make up for it. Packed inside its dust- and splash-proof magnesium alloy body, you'll find a 16.05-megapixel Live Mos sensor that'll handle 200 to 12,800 ISO natively with extension from 125 to 25,600. Aiding it is Panasonic's latest Venus engine, which enables 6 FPS burst shooting (20 in 4-megapixel mode). Notably, Panasonic is pushing this as a "multimedia" shooter given its robust video features. Unlike many ILCs, the GH3 touts unlimited recording time, so you won't be held back by the likes of the camera overheating -- sadly, the approx. 29-minute recording restriction for PAL regions is in place however. You'll be able to shoot in either MP4, MOV, AVCHD or AVCHD Progressive, with a maximum bandwidth of "72 Mbps (ALL-Intra) / 50 Mbps (IPB)." The formats can be recorded using frame rates of 24, 30 and 60p (excluding MOV and AVCHD), and you'll even be able work with SMPTE time-codes for syncing footage easily in post production. On back, there's an articulating 3:2 614K-dot OLED touchscreen, which can be used for tap-focusing while recording video, along with a 16:9 1,744K-dot OLED view finder -- both of which provide 100% frame coverage. Thanks to included WiFi connectivity, you'll be able to control the camera from your mobile device -- although, its HDMI out may be better suited for film-making. Along the side, there's a duo 3.5mm jacks for monitoring and recording audio straight from the camera with a mic of your choosing or a Panasonic's optional shotgun mic. Speaking of accessories, an F2.8 35-100mm lens will also be introduced with the camera, touting a dust- and splash-proof design. There's no word on price just yet for the GH3 or its accessories, but we're told the camera will hit shelves for a number shy of $2,000 when it's released later this year. The unit we got eye-on time with was an admittedly rough and early build, but you can check it in detail at the gallery above while we get some more impressions at Photokina. You'll also find extended details in the press release after the break. Zach Honig contributed to this report.

  • Panasonic G5 mirrorless camera gets September 13th release date in Japan

    by 
    Jamie Rigg
    Jamie Rigg
    08.23.2012

    We enjoyed our short time with Panasonic's new mirrorless G5 in our hands-on last month, even if it was a little on the porky side. And, if you hail from the Land of the Rising Sun and had your heart set on one of these 16-megapixel shooters, Panny's announced you'll get your chance from September 13th. We're getting dangerously close to missing the stateside launch target of August, but where the US website is showing the G5 as unreleased, availability on Amazon tells a different story. We're reaching out for confirmation on that -- as well as pricing -- and will update should we hear more.

  • Kipon preps Canon EF lens adapters for Micro Four Thirds, NEX cameras with electronic control

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    07.25.2012

    Adapters to fit Canon's EF lenses on Micro Four Thirds and NEX camera bodies most definitely aren't new. Without any electronic link, though, that Lumix GX1 or NEX-F3 owner has had to focus by hand, sometimes without any aperture control -- what year is it, 1930? Kipon wants to make sure you'll never have to stoop to that level again through a pair of new adapters that keep the electronic controls working. As always with these parts, there's likely to be catches: we don't know the prices and ship dates, for one, and lens conversion can still hurt the autofocus speed. Even so, anyone who's been hoarding (or simply envious of) Canon glass now doesn't have to eye an EOS-M just to get a mirrorless camera with the lens adapter they crave.

  • IRL: Canon EOS 7D, Snapseed for iOS and Panasonic's Lumix DMC-TS4 rugged camera

    by 
    Engadget
    Engadget
    07.20.2012

    Welcome to IRL, an ongoing feature where we talk about the gadgets, apps and toys we're using in real life and take a second look at products that already got the formal review treatment. And we're back! Most of us Engadgeteers are freshly returned from a staff retreat to the countryside, and for whatever reason, we're in the mood to gab about cameras. This week, Steve explains his love for Canon's 7D, Darren makes a case for Snapseed and Dana takes Panasonic's rugged TS4 shooter into the Puerto Rican rain forest.

  • Panasonic's Lumix lineup grows: DMC-G5 Micro Four Thirds, DMC-FZ200 superzoom and DMC-LX7 hands-on and sample shots

    by 
    Michael Gorman
    Michael Gorman
    07.18.2012

    It's been nearly half a year since Panasonic's Lumix series of cameras got any new members, but today the company is introducing three more shooters to the family. First up is the DMC-G5, the latest addition to the company's Micro Four Thirds lineup. It's the successor to the G3 and packs a 16-megapixel sensor capable of shooting 1080p videos at 60fps and stills in up to 6fps bursts at a max 12,800 ISO at full resolution. The G5's LVF has a proximity sensor to automatically switch between it and the camera's 920,000-dot capacitive screen depending on which one you're using to frame your shots. When the G5 goes on sale next month, you'll have your choice of black, silver and white models.%Gallery-160553% In addition to the G5, Panasonic's also introducing a new superzoom camera, the DMC-FZ200 and a high-end DMC-LX7 point-and-shoot. The FZ200 replaces the FZ150 and pairs a 12-megapixel sensor with a 25-600mm constant f/2.8 aperture Leica Elmarit lens with nano surface coating to reduce flare and ghosting. It has a 24x optical zoom and shoots 1080p video at up to 60fps along with stills in up to 12fps bursts, though its max ISO is only 6,400. Meanwhile, the LX7 has arrived sporting a 10-megapixel sensor and a 24-90mm, f/1.4-2.3 Leica Summilux lens with the same nano surface coating as the FZ200. Like its Lumix brethren, it shoots 1080p video at 60fps, and shares the same maximum 12,800 ISO as the G5. It'll be available in black and pearl white when it ships in August. We got to spend some time with all three, so join us after the break to learn a bit about what its like snapping pics with this trio of Panasonics.%Gallery-160554%%Gallery-160552%

  • How would you change the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1?

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    07.08.2012

    We've got a big, no, massive soft-spot for the GX1 around these parts. It was being reviewed during this year's CES and our man behind the lens rapidly became the object of our envy. In fact the only thing that really made us wince when testing it was the $950 price for the kit model -- otherwise we could feel our wallets opening obligingly. But how about those of you who did opt for one of these beauties? Does your experience match our own, or were there some unexpected bumps along the way? Now's your chance to share them with us.

  • Panasonic Lumix FX90 gets remote app for iOS and Android

    by 
    Mat Smith
    Mat Smith
    05.28.2012

    Taking full advantage of the Lumix FX90's WiFi capability, Panasonic has unveiled its companion apps for both iOS and Android devices. Throwing in shutter functionality and zoom control alongside a larger viewfinder, it's pretty much a glossy dumb remote; there's no further features to make the most of your precious smartphone, although the camera itself is already capable of linking up your camera shots with your major social network of choice. The app requires a firmware update on the camera, but it should ensure all those self-portraits really pop in the future. Download links for the wannabe self-obsessed are waiting below.

  • Leica boosts compact portfolio with V-Lux 40 point-and-shoot, APS-C-equipped X2

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    05.10.2012

    Leica has built a name for itself in the compact market over the years with a handful of Panasonic rebrands -- these Lumix models come equipped with a matte black housing, Leica lens and that famous red dot, with the inflated price tag to match. With this latest batch of cameras, the company appears to be taking a more respectable approach -- at least with its high-end X2. But first, let's tackle the V-Lux 40. On the Panasonic front, this camera looks strikingly similar to the Lumix DMC-ZS20 we saw emerge after CES. Both cameras include 14.1-megapixel 1/2.3-inch CMOS sensors, a 20x, 24-480mm f/3.3-6.4 optical zoom lens and 1080p video capture. The housing has been modified slightly to include a recessed control panel, Panasonic branding has been removed and the Leica logo added. Such luxuries more than double the camera's price from $269 to $699. Ouch. You can pick up the V-Lux 40 beginning today, or you can grab two virtually identical ZS20s for the same amount, with significant cash to spare. You may remember the Leica X1, but you probably don't. This $2,000 shooter was determined to be overpriced when it launched way back in 2009, and now the APS-C-equipped series has returned for a refresh. Dubbed the X2, this year's flavor ups the ante with a 16.2-megapixel CMOS sensor (boosted from 12.2) while retaining that beloved $2k sticker price. The compact all-in-one includes a fixed 24mm Leica Elmarit f/2.8 ASPH lens, which the company validates as a "classical focal length for photojournalism," and a 2.7-inch 230k-pixel LCD on the rear. There's also an option to add a Viso-Flex 1.4MP viewfinder with a 90-degree swivel function, along with a shoe-mounted mirror finder. The $1,995 camera's price tag may be tough to swallow -- but only until you discover the gratis copy of Adobe Lightroom in the box. Both the ZS20 V-Lux 40 and X2 are available now. Snap past the break for the pitch from Leica.

  • Panasonic Lumix GF5 accidentally leaked by Hong Kong spokesperson?

    by 
    Richard Lai
    Richard Lai
    03.18.2012

    Frequent social networkers will tell you that Instagram's usually plastered with food photos and self-portraits, so we were quite surprised to see a product leak over there. After some careful inspection, we're pretty certain that the above picture shows a legit Panasonic Lumix GF5, which from this angle bears much resemblance to the GF3 bar the grip. To add credibility here, the uploader is none other than Hong Kong celebrity Angelababy who happens to be the brand ambassador for Panny (oopsie!). Unsurprisingly, the twee model has already removed the offending picture from her account, but the direct image link still works.You may be wondering: shouldn't this Micro Four Thirds camera be the GF4 after the current GF3? Well, much like Chinese superstition, Japan also prefers to steer clear of the number 4 as it sounds the same as "death" in Japanese. For instance: there was no Lumix LX4 before the LX5. As for specs, Chinese website Nphoto reported earlier this month that the GF5 will also feature a 12-megapixel sensor but with a better signal-to-noise ratio and topping at ISO 12800, while on the back it'll have a much sharper LCD with 920k dots (instead of just 460k on the GF3). Judging by the looks of things it shouldn't be long before we see Angelababy presenting this new camera for real -- let's just hope that she gets to keep her job.

  • Panasonic introduces Lumix DMC-ZS20 and ZS15 compact superzoom cameras

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    01.31.2012

    We've seen Panasonic's 2012 lineup of ruggedized and entry-level point-and-shoot cameras, but now the Japanese-based manufacturer is unleashing a pair of compact "Traveler Zoom" cams to the 2012 mix. The Lumix DMC-ZS20 and ZS15 include 20x (24-480mm) and 16x (24-384mm) optically stabilized zoom lenses, respectively, 3-inch 460k-pixel LCDs, 1/2.3-inch High Sensitivity MOS sensors and a 10 fps burst shooting mode (5 fps with continuous AF). The higher-end ZS20 features a 14.1 megapixel sensor and 1080/60p video shooting while the ZS15 captures 12.1 megapixel stills and 1080/60i HD clips. Both cameras include 0.1-second "Light Speed Autofocus" and top sensitivity levels of ISO 3200, though you'll need to opt for the ZS20 to take advantage of GPS with map logging and a noise-canceling stereo mic. The pair will ship in March, with a black, red, white or silver ZS20 running you $350, compared with a $280 price tag on the black or silver ZS15. As always, you'll find the full PR after the break.

  • Panasonic adds Lumix DMC-TS4 and DMC-TS20 to ruggedized camera line

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    01.31.2012

    Panasonic has helped lead the market for ruggedized cameras, which have been a hit among adventurous photographers for years, and now the company has two new additions to add to its water/shock/freeze/dustproof cam line. Described as "the optical outdoor companion," the Lumix DMC-TS4 is Panasonic's new ruggedized flagship, replacing the TS3 and packing a 12.1 megapixel CCD sensor, 1080/60i HD video capture, a 4.6x 28-128mm optical zoom lens and 2.7-inch LCD. Naturally, it can withstand just about everything you'll throw its way, considering that it's waterproof to depths of 40 feet, shockproof to 6.6 feet and freezeproof to temps as low as 14 degrees Fahrenheit. The TS4 also includes GPS, compass, altimeter and barometer functionality, logging all this data to supplement your photos with a full weather and location readout. Panasonic has also added full manual control, letting you adjust both aperture and shutter speed when shooting in manual mode.The TS4 may offer a respectable spec list, but it doesn't come cheap. The TS20 is an attractive alliterative, however, with a slim profile, 16.1 megapixel sensor, 720p HD shooting, a 4x 25-100mm optically stabilized zoom lens and a 2.7-inch LCD. It's waterproof to 16 feet, freezeproof to 14 degrees Fahrenheit and can survive drops from up to five feet. There's no manual option on this lower-end model, but it does include Panasonic's Intelligent Auto mode for more accurate shooting. The TS20 will ship in late-February in orange, blue, black and red for $180, while the flagship TS4 will be available in orange, blue, black and silver for $400 when it ships in mid-March. You'll find both press releases after the break.

  • Panasonic announces pricing for entry-level Lumix CES point-and-shoots

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    01.31.2012

    Panasonic's slew of low-end Lumix point-and-shoots may have slid in under your radar during CES, but now the Japanese camera maker is back to refresh your memory -- this time with pricing and availability in tow. We'll outline the models just below, which are all set to ship in March, but feel free to jump past the break for the Panasonic press release. Lumix DMC-S2 - $109.99 Lumix DMC-FH6 - $129.99 Lumix DMC-FH8 - $149.99 Lumix DMC-SZ1 - $179.99 Lumix DMC-SZ7 - $199.99

  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 Micro Four Thirds camera review

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    01.23.2012

    It's no surprise that the mirrorless interchangeable lens camera category is continuing to grow at a rapid pace. These compact, pro-featured ILCs undoubtedly have a strong future, with mass consumer appeal and a widening assortment of price points. We're particularly taken with the technology's compact footprint -- we're focusing our camera reviews on mirrorless models, and even outfitted our entire CES team with Sony's NEX-C3. But long before the likes of Sony and Fujifilm launched their first cameras, Olympus and Panasonic dominated the then-infant mirrorless category, developing the Micro Four Thirds sensor standard, that, for better or worse, has failed to catch on among other manufacturers. Surprisingly, Panasonic's pioneering days were far stronger than those of recent past, with the company's GF1 melting the hearts of compact-seeking professionals. But following that successful first model, Panasonic opted to take the GF series in a different direction, launching a dumbed-down GF2 (and later GF3) in what was likely an attempt to appeal to the much larger amateur category. This left the GF1 faithful without a worthy successor -- until now. Panasonic's Lumix line gets a lot more crowded Panasonic Lumix GX1 Micro Four Thirds camera surfaces in leaked photos Panasonic launches Lumix DMC-GX1 Micro Four Thirds camera, we go hands-onThe Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 looks pretty standard on paper: there's a 16-megapixel Live MOS sensor, a choice of body colors, RAW shooting, HD video and a top sensitivity of ISO 12,800. Just as it did with the GF2 and GF3 body designs, Panasonic took a different direction with its new X-series lenses, swapping the traditional manual zoom for a motorized version, enabling a much more compact footprint. The difference when positioned alongside the NEX-C3's 18-55mm zoom is staggering, but Panasonic didn't arrive at this slick design without compromise, particularly noticeable when it comes time to swallow the $950 kit price. Still, one look at the hardened matte black metal body is all it takes to know that this is no GF4 -- this is it, the long-awaited successor to the GF1 has finally arrived. So, will the GX1 be our new top pick for the mirrorless category? Join us past the break to find out.

  • Panasonic's Lumix line gets a lot more crowded

    by 
    Brian Heater
    Brian Heater
    01.09.2012

    Panasonic's Lumix line is celebrating a whole bunch of new entries this week at CES. The FH series is expanding with two new slim additions, the DMC-FH6 and DMC-FH8. Both models do 720p video at 30 fps and rock Leica lenses and 5x optical zoom. The 16.1 megapixel FH8 has a three-inch LCD and shoots HD videos in MP4. The 14.1 megapixel F6 captures HD video in JPEG format and features a 2.7-inch display. Both new entries in the SZ series, meanwhile, feature 10x optical zoom, three-inch LCDs and 25mm ultra-wide angle Leica lenses. The SZ7 does 14.1 megapixel images and 1080p video, while the SZ1 goes 14.1 megapixels and 720p on the video front. Also debuting this week is the LUMIX DMC-S2, a 14.1 megapixel compact shooter with 4x optical zoom and 720p video capabilities. The point-and-shoot also features Panasonic's panoramic mode for stitching together images and auto retouch to adjust contrast and brightness in photos on the fly. As for pricing and availability? Not so much. Panasonic has promised such things a month prior to release -- whenever that might be. Lots of pertinent press info after the break.

  • Leica rehashes Panasonic's Lumix Fz150 as the V-LUX 3, because 'image' matters

    by 
    Joe Pollicino
    Joe Pollicino
    12.08.2011

    Leave it to Leica to rebrand a recent Panasonic camera, tack on its iconic red dot and then likely charge a premium. Such is the case with its "new" V-Lux 3 digital superzoom, which is essentially its take on the venerable Lumix FZ150 we spent some hands-on time with back in August. To recap, this shooter features a 12.1 megapixel CMOS sensor, Leica's DC Vario-Elmarit 4.5 - 108 mm f/2.8 - 5.2 ASPH lens (that's 25 - 600mm for you full-frame buffs), 1080p AVC HD video recording at up to 60fps with stereo sound and an a77-like 12fps continuous burst mode (albeit using manual focus). On back, you'll find an articulating 3-inch LCD loaded with a 460K pixel resolution and a 0.2-inch EVF, both of which feature nearly 100% frame coverage. While there's no word price, you can surely expect the V-Lux 3 to cost a few Benjamins more than its Lumix counterpart when it hits shelves in January. Hey, at least you can say it's a Leica, right?

  • Engadget's holiday gift guide 2011: digital cameras

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    11.25.2011

    Welcome to the Engadget Holiday Gift Guide! We're well aware of the heartbreaking difficulties surrounding the seasonal shopping experience, so we're here to help you sort out this year's tech treasures. Below is today's bevy of curated picks, and you can head back to the Gift Guide hub to see the rest of the product guides as they're added throughout the holiday season. With cameras popping up on tablets, smartphones and even Bluetooth headsets, there's a fairly good chance that there's already a device in your pocket capable of shooting high-res stills and HD video. But even with popular apps like Instagram on-board, mobile devices still can't match the versatility and image quality of a dedicated snapper. If you're looking to hide a new point-and-shoot under the tree this year, there are plenty of great options to consider, for any budget. So clear off the memory card and get ready to jump past the break for our top picks that will deliver -- and capture -- plenty of holiday cheer.

  • Panasonic launches Lumix DMC-GX1 Micro Four Thirds camera, we go hands-on

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    11.07.2011

    Remember the Lumix GF1? It was one of Panasonic's first Micro Four Thirds cameras, setting the bar quite high for models to come. But the GF1's successors -- the GF2 and GF3 -- did not live up to expectations, with the company gradually shifting the series towards transitioning point-and-shoot users, and away from early adopters who grew accustomed to the performance and build quality offered by that beloved early mirrorless cam. Now that familiar look and feel is back, in the form of the Lumix DMC-GX1. The 16 megapixel ILC includes a Live MOS sensor and Venus engine, with a maximum ISO of 12,800. Like other Panasonic G-series cameras, the GX1 uses a Micro Four Thirds mount, and is compatible with both Panasonic and Olympus lenses, including the standard 14-42mm zoom that ships with the $800 kit, or the Lumix G X Vario PZ 14-42mm retractable lens that comes packaged for $950. Existing lens owners can pick up just the body for $700. What we really missed was the solid feel of the GF1 -- everything from the housing to the controls felt well-made, while the design of later GF models, was... underwhelming. Picking up the GX1 helped to restore our confidence in the series -- it was a pleasure to hold. There's quite a bit of power under the hood, too. We weren't able to test the GX1, which is expected to hit stores in mid-December, but Panasonic promises autofocus speeds of 0.09 second -- you can focus simply by touching your subject on the 3-inch, 460,000-dot touchscreen. There's also an external EVF option, which attaches to the camera's hot shoe and offers a 1.44 million-dot display with 100-percent field of view. Movie buffs can capture 1080/60i HD video, with either MP4 or AVCHD compression. It goes without saying that the GX1 can shoot in RAW, and offers the complete gamut of advanced shooting modes. Of course the features don't stop there, so jump past the break for the full PR from Panasonic.%Gallery-138523%%Gallery-138519%