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Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a robotic cockroach that can crawl through the tightest of gaps. The team began by studying actual cockroaches, observing how they moved through the densely packed rainforest floor. While some obstacles are pushed past or climbed over, the cockroaches freq...

8 days ago 0 Comments
June 23, 2015 at 9:44AM
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A number of companies have developed photo software for facial recognition, but what happens when your face is partially hidden? What if it's completely covered up? Facebook's artificial intelligence lab developed an algorithm that remedies the issue by picking out folks with other clues. Instead ...

9 days ago 0 Comments
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Solar cells have always been inspired by photosynthesis, so it's only natural for researchers to take cues from different aspects of the energy-making process. A team of UCLA chemists, for instance, have developed a way that will allow solar cells to keep their charge for weeks instead of just a f...

11 days ago 0 Comments
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Lithium-based batteries' tendency to overheat and catch fire has been keeping back the development of promising new technologies. In particular, it's been affecting R&D of lithium-sulfur and lithium-air batteries, both of which are much lighter than current options and can store 10 times more ...

13 days ago 0 Comments
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CNN already announced its intent to make drones part of news coverage. It's not the only media outlet looking to leverage the UAVs, though, as a group of 15 other companies are partnering with Virginia Tech to conduct trials of their own. The university's facility in Bealeton, Virginia is one of t...

15 days ago 0 Comments
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Wireless electricity transmission sounds... dangerous, but the ability to do it could transform the internet of things. Researchers from the University of Washington have charged a JawBone UP24 fitness tracker with nothing but ordinary WiFi. They noticed that regular, ambient WiFi was strong enoug...

26 days ago 0 Comments
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Seals with sensors have been roaming Antarctica's seas for over a decade and the trove of data they gathered is now available to scientists across the world. The research, conducted by an 11-nation consortium called Marine Mammals exploring the Oceans Pole-to-Pole (MEOP), was designed to see how c...

28 days ago 0 Comments
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When you need to move something but it's too heavy to lift off the ground, most of us default to one of two strategies: find someone stronger, or shove it along the floor instead. Researchers from the University of Tokyo's JSK Laboratory are now teaching robots to do the latter. The latest version...

29 days ago 0 Comments
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The human race is doomed, and it's all our own fault. With the quantity of carbon in our atmosphere now well beyond the safe limit, it's almost certain the planet's temperature will continue to rise. Climate change is causing natural disasters of biblical proportions; a situation that's only going...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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What a person does on their phone call tell you a lot about them -- including their GPA. Researchers from Dartmouth College and the University of Texas at Austin have developed an app that tracks smartphone activity to compute a grade point average that's within 0.17 of a point. The software is ca...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Gaming has well known dark sides, but it can also improve spatial skills, reduce stress and even bring families together. Two new studies may further confuse you about the benefits, with one concluding that gaming makes you friendlier in the real world, and another implying it could ruin your brai...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Here's one type of biometric authentication you might not have heard of before: using your brain's response to words as your personal identification. Blair Armstrong and his team of researchers from the Basque Center on Cognition, Brain, and Language in Spain observed the brain signals of 45 subje...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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The European Commission (EC) has finally confirmed what we've all known for years: if you shut down one online piracy site, another will simply take its place. A report published by the EC's Joint Research Center found that the closure of Kino.to, a popular unlicensed streaming site in Germany, ha...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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The standard line about solar power is that while good in theory, the technology just isn't there to keep our lights on and our Netflix streaming. But a new study from MIT (PDF) suggests that's not the case. According to the massive report (an epic 356 pages) current crystalline silicon photovolta...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Forget those teensy deep-sea submersibles cradling crews of brave scientists -- the future of underwater exploration might be led by robots that can do their own thing. MIT engineers, led by professor Brian Williams, cooked up a system that lets autonomous underwater drones figure out and act on t...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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A team of researchers from Yahoo Labs has developed a much affordable alternative to fingerprint sensors for phones. It's a biometric system called "Bodyprint," and it only needs devices' capacitive touchscreen displays to authenticate body parts. Since displays have lower input resolution compare...

2 months ago 0 Comments
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ResearchKit, Apple's open-source initiative to transform iDevices into medical diagnostic tools, is now available to researchers so they can create their own apps. ResearchKit launched with apps aimed at studying asthma, breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and Parkinson's disease, but ...

2 months ago 0 Comments
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When you get your first self-driving car, don't forget to put a few barf bags in it... just in case. A duo from the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute explains that you'll likely be more susceptible to motion sickness in self-driving cars due to a couple of reasons. First, ...

2 months ago 0 Comments
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It's tough identifying Parkinson's disease in its early stages -- there are no standard lab tests to diagnose it and symptoms are subtle. A group of MIT researchers believe the answer could lie in something a lot of people already use: the computer keyboard. They've recently conducted a study prov...

3 months ago 0 Comments