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  • eBay's testing Amazon Prime-like shipping service in Germany

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    05.21.2015

    Amazon Prime offers many benefits to its subscribers, starting with super-fast shipping on web purchases. Not surprisingly, retail competitor eBay must try to match this. Over in Germany, the company has started trialling a program slightly similar to Prime, reportedly called eBay +, which will be launching in the second half of this year. Buyers there are said to have to pay between €15 and €20 (roughly $17 and $22) per year, an amount that would be reasonable considering the service's main purpose: free, fast shipping and other undisclosed exclusive benefits.

  • Amazon's Fire TV Stick arrives in the UK next month for £35

    by 
    Nick Summers
    Nick Summers
    03.24.2015

    Google's Chromecast streaming dongle has proven to be quite the hit, but it does come with some drawbacks. There's no physical remote, for instance, and the lack of menus or any overarching UI can be alienating for some. Amazon took a swing at the idea last October with the Fire TV Stick, and after launching in the US it's ready to tackle the UK too. It'll begin shipping on April 15th, although Prime members can pre-order the device today for £19. That's a sizeable discount on the regular £35 asking price, which is just a smidge higher than Google's offering (£30) in the Play store. If you've been weighing up a new Prime subscription, this could be the time to take the plunge; the company will knock the stick down to £7 for anyone that's willing to sign up for a new 12-month membership.

  • Daily Roundup: Apple Watch battery life, Russian combat bots and more!

    by 
    Dave Schumaker
    Dave Schumaker
    01.22.2015

    One of the biggest complaints about smartwatches is their mediocre battery life. It sounds like the Apple Watch will be no different. In other news, internet activist Barrett Brown was sent to prison for five years and Russia showed off some "combat robots" that still have a lot to prove, fortunately. Catch up on today's top stories after the break.

  • Amazon gives UK Prime members unlimited photo storage too

    by 
    Matt Brian
    Matt Brian
    11.11.2014

    When Amazon announced that it was extending Prime subscription perks to include unlimited photo storage, the online retailer continued its tradition of making features available to US customers only. While we've been made to wait longer for other products and services, the company today saw it fit to open the service to us Brits, allowing you to upload your entire photo library (in full resolution) to its cloud. Amazon lets you upload your images one of three ways; via the web, using its iOS or Android apps, or by downloading its dedicated PC app (a Mac app is on its way). You'll then be able to view them using Amazon's Fire TV, console apps and selected smart TVs -- perfect for when the in-laws arrive at your door unannounced and you need to provide some quick entertainment.

  • AT&T tempts cord-cutters with $40-a-month broadband with HBO and Amazon Prime

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    09.23.2014

    If you tried to count the number of times that we'd wished cable companies would offer nothing more than HBO Go and broadband, you'd run out of limbs well before you hit the total. AT&T, however, is following Comcast's lead in offering a cord-cutter bundle that offers us exactly what we want without any of that messy cable grift we normally have to pay for. The $39 a month U-Verse + HBO bundle offers U-Basic TV and U-Verse Internet Max Plus, paired with HBO and HBO Go but also, more notably, a year's free Amazon Prime subscription as well. The company is also trialling a package that ditches the U-Basic TV and HBO options and just offers you broadband and Amazon Prime for $29 a month, although that's only available in Atlanta, Chicago, Houston and San Francisco. The catch here is that once the 12-month contract expires, you're bumped up to AT&T's standard rates, but, hey, at least that's a year you don't have to worry about paying through the nose for 900 channels you'll never watch.

  • Amazon Prime Instant Video finally comes to Android

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    09.09.2014

    We've been waiting for what seems like forever, but today's the day that Amazon finally lets Android users watch video on the go. The company has updated its core shopping app to bake-in Prime Instant Video, enabling users to catch digital re-runs of The Sopranos whatever device they're rocking. The updated app also now lets customers access every part of Amazon's online retail catalog, so they can pick up a kitchen appliance or two in line at the DMV. The app is available for free on Google Play, with 5GB of free cloud photo storage with Amazon Cloud Drive thrown in as a sweetener. [Thanks, Anthony]

  • Amazon expands Prime Music library with loads of new tracks

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    07.23.2014

    Amazon's recently announced music service for Prime members just got a bit better. Today, the giant online retailer revealed that its Prime Music library is welcoming a bunch of new songs into the mix, from artists such as Miles Davis, Ray Charles, Kendrick Lamar, Shakira, Skrillex, Ella Fitzgerald, DJ Snake & Lil Jon (#TD4W, anyone?) and many, many more. To make use of these newly added tunes, Amazon said it has curated "hundreds" of fresh Prime Playlists, citing this feature as one users have come to love since the service's launch last month. Amazon will need to keep making similar moves if Prime Music is to be a threat to the likes of Spotify, so this is, without a doubt, a step in the right direction. The next natural step would be expanding outside of the US, but record labels might make that a lot more complicated than it sounds.

  • Amazon now offers two-day Prime shipping within Europe

    by 
    Matt Brian
    Matt Brian
    07.17.2014

    Amazon believes its European distribution network is pretty damn solid, so to prove that, it's added a new delivery tier for Prime members within Europe. From today, subscribers can enjoy free two-day deliveries on over a million products stored in other EU countries. Previously, Amazon would make you wait between 3-7 days, but thanks to a number of "improvements and innovations in its cross border delivery network," the company reckons it can offer expedited shipping on more than 3 million products by year end. Although most will continue to rely on domestic next-day deliveries (when available), Amazon's expansion will be welcome news to those who can only get what they need from sellers in other countries.

  • Amazon's Prime Pantry service lets you ship 45 pounds of groceries for a $6 fee

    by 
    Sarah Silbert
    Sarah Silbert
    04.23.2014

    Amazon's dead-set on killing off the grocery store, with a same-day delivery service and even a Dash gadget for restocking items around the house. Now the retailer's going one step further, taking on Costco and Walmart with a new program called Prime Pantry. If you're a Prime member living in the 48 contiguous states, you can ship 45 pounds' worth of household essentials -- in "everyday sizes," not in bulk -- for a flat fee of $6. (Yes, that's on top of your Prime membership payment.) Amazon told us the items available include "popular soft drinks and bottled water, a new range of paper and laundry products in popular pack sizes, single boxes of breakfast cereal, potato chips, convenience-sized personal care products and more." Rumors about an Amazon Pantry service began circling late last year, and while the service is live now, the company hasn't formally announced it.

  • Switched On: Amazon's Puzzling Prime Directive

    by 
    Ross Rubin
    Ross Rubin
    03.29.2014

    Each week Ross Rubin contributes Switched On, a column about consumer technology. More Info Amazon likely to announce media streamer at April 2nd event Showtime's Anytime app arrives on Roku Amazon will reportedly launch a free video streaming service Apple makes its money by selling devices. As such, it's incentivized to have content -- or at least the delivery of it -- exclusive to its devices. For years, the company implemented DRM (digital rights management) on music sold through iTunes. It fought such restrictions, but nonetheless benefited from them. Even today it proclaims its leadership position in the number of applications available for its platforms; many of these arrive on the iPhone exclusively, at least for a while. Netflix, on the other hand, makes its money selling content subscriptions. As such, it's incentivized to have its content available on all suitable devices that consumers use. Indeed, the streaming company has covered an unmatched number of displays. One can access the service from PCs and Macs; iOS, Android and Windows devices; nearly every connected TV and Blu-ray player; major game consoles; Chrome devices; TiVo; and Apple TV. The Roku broadband video box began as a product that ran only Netflix.

  • Weekly Roundup: Apple releases iOS 7.1, Amazon raises the price of Prime and more!

    by 
    Andy Bowen
    Andy Bowen
    03.16.2014

    You might say the week is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workweek, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Weekly Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past seven days -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

  • Amazon is reportedly working on a music-streaming service

    by 
    Sarah Silbert
    Sarah Silbert
    02.27.2014

    Amazon does much more than dominate the online-shopping space. With its Prime instant video service, complete with original series and exclusives, the company has taken on Netflix -- and it looks like challenging Spotify and other music services is Amazon's next step. According to sources who spoke with Re/code, the company is currently in talks with music labels to offer a subscription-style service. The news is hardly surprising, but it's unclear when exactly an Amazon music-streaming platform would arrive. According to one "label source," the company's demand for deeper discounts is holding up its talks with labels. When the back-room negotiations come to a conclusion, though, the cost of buying those music rights will likely be worth it, especially considering hints that the annual Prime subscription could increase by up to $40. In theory, at least, customers would be more likely to shell out that fee if they received more bundled features like free music streaming. However, Re/code makes a good point in noting that many Prime subscribers aren't even aware that they have access to instant video, so perhaps a streaming service would help Amazon highlight the privileges of Prime membership -- if the music service is bundled with Prime at all, that is.

  • Newegg's $50 Premier is like Amazon Prime, but without the video streaming

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    02.05.2014

    While Amazon's debating whether or not it should hike Prime subscription fees in the US, now its decision may have to take into consideration a potential competitor. This morning, Newegg introduced Premier, a $50 shipping service that aims to cope with the likes of Amazon Prime. For that yearly fee, Newegg promises to get stuff to your doorstep in three days or less, as well as a number of other benefits including no restocking fees, free returns and dedicated customer service. You will, however, miss out on the Instant Video streaming offered through Prime, but this also means you'll end up saving $29 per year -- which is something that could make sense to folks who are already subscribed to Netflix. Or, there's always Newegg's free option, Super Eggsaver; just be prepared to wait a lot longer for your online purchases to arrive.

  • Amazon reportedly considering live TV channels for new pay-TV service (updated: Amazon denies report)

    by 
    Joseph Volpe
    Joseph Volpe
    01.21.2014

    If the rumors surrounding Amazon's forthcoming set-top box are any indication, the company's betting big on online video delivery. It's a move Amazon may even be hinting at with its latest recruitment event in Boston. But as the Wall Street Journal reports, access to third-party streaming apps via a set-top box and original programming aren't the only parts of Amazon's online video strategy -- it reportedly wants to get into live TV streaming, as well. The company has allegedly met with major content providers in the hopes of inking licensing agreements for this new cable-like service, though current talks are said to be preliminary. It's not clear if this new pay-TV initiative would be bundled into Amazon's Prime Instant Video service or offered as a standalone package. What's certain is that Amazon would need to price the service competitively so as to stand out amongst its competition -- a somewhat daunting task considering existing carriage agreements. Content providers currently rely on lucrative licensing agreements with cable operators and, typically, balk when those terms aren't favorable (exhibit A: CBS' recent dispute with Time Warner Cable). It remains to be seen if Amazon would be able to lock down agreeable terms for live TV channels and how that would impact subscription packages. Like most of Amazon's rumored projects, however, this could end up being just another exploratory project that may not see the light of day. Regardless, we've reached out to Amazon for comment and will update when we hear back. Updated: Amazon has since responded to our request for comment, saying that the Wall Street Journal report is untrue and that the company has no plans to license TV channels or build out a new pay-TV service. You can read Amazon's official statement below. We continue to build selection for Prime Instant Video and create original shows at Amazon Studios, but we are not planning to license television channels or offer a pay-TV service.

  • Weekly Roundup: Amazon Prime Air drones, LG G Flex review, hands-on with the YotaPhone and more!

    by 
    Andy Bowen
    Andy Bowen
    12.08.2013

    You might say the week is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workweek, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Weekly Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past seven days -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

  • Amazon intros X-Ray for TV, helps you remember those 'Game of Thrones' actors

    by 
    Brian Heater
    Brian Heater
    03.27.2013

    Amazon's continuing the steady X-Ray takeover of media today by extending the feature to its TV selection. The latest implementation of the concept, which has already made its way to the company's e-book offerings, offers up similar functionality to its movie counterpart, harnessing IMDB data to offer up contextual information on actors. The feature's available as of today for "most popular TV shows" on the company's Instant Video offering (some of which are also a part of its Prime video selection). And it's a solid list, too, including: Justified, Downton Abbey, The West Wing, Sons of Anarchy, Falling Skies, American Horror Story, Grey's Anatomy, Doctor Who, The Walking Dead, Lost, Glee, Breaking Bad and Game of Thrones. More info on the feature can be found below.

  • Amazon Prime flaunts a monthly price tag, now offers streaming and two day shipping for $7.99 per month

    by 
    Sean Buckley
    Sean Buckley
    11.06.2012

    Amazon Prime's trifecta of two-day shipping, instant media streaming and monthly Kindle book rentals just became a little more consumer friendly at a slightly higher price. As a Hacking Netflix reader recently noticed, Amazon is now inviting users to buy into Prime for $7.99 a month, bringing the service in line with Hulu and Netflix's monthly pricing schemes. The price of skipping the yearly fee is its own cost, however -- subscribers who stick with Prime for a full year will pay $16.88 over the annual plan. Paying for all 12-months ahead of time is still an option, of course, scoring long-term buyers a 20 percent discount at checkout. Good deal? Sure. Even better if you're trying to save on shipping this holiday season.

  • Amazon extending Kindle Owners' Lending Library to the UK, Germany and France this month

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    10.11.2012

    Amazon's Kindle Owners' Lending Library has grown considerably since launching in the US, and it looks like the company's finally decided it was time to let some other countries in on the service as well. It announced today that Amazon Prime members in the UK, Germany and France would all have access to the service "later this month," although it's not providing a specific date just yet. As in the US, it will let folks borrow up to one book a month for free, with over 200,000 titles available to choose from (including "thousands" in the countries' local languages). Alongside that expansion, Amazon has also announced yet another increase (of $100,000) to its Kindle Direct Publishing Select fund -- which pays independent authors who include their books in the Lending Library -- with an even bigger one planed for November. No word yet on any additional countries next in line.

  • Amazon joins up with Epix, adds thousands of flicks to Prime Instant Video roster

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    09.04.2012

    Truth be told, Amazon's Prime Instant Video selection isn't the most comprehensive library on the net, but it's well on its way, thanks to a new licensing agreement with the Epix. The entertainment network, which partners with studios that include Lionsgate, MGM and Paramount, brings access to recent blockbusters like The Avengers, The Hunger Games and Thor, along with evergreen gems like Justin Bieber Never Say Never. Most importantly, it means Netflix is no longer the only subscription streaming home for those titles after its two year exclusive deal ran out. Amazon's streaming service, which includes thousands of movies and television shows, enables customers subscribing to Prime for $79 per year to stream content without additional monthly fees, in addition to benefits that include discounted shipping and a Kindle book loan program. The terms of the deal have not been announced, but the press release (available in full after the break) lists the partnership as a "multi-year licensing agreement," benefiting customers in the US.

  • Amazon says more items are now shipped with Prime than free shipping, dishes a few other stats

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    08.27.2012

    Amazon isn't one to provide a lot of specific numbers on the products and services it offers, but it has confirmed today that its $79 a year Prime service recently crossed a fairly significant milestone. The company says that more items are now shipped with Prime's two-day shipping than with its standard Free Super Saver Shipping -- which is, presumably, quite a lot. Of course, Prime has grown to become considerably more than just a premium shipping option since it launched in 2005, and Amazon has also taken the opportunity to divulge a few other details on the service. On Prime Instant Video, it says that it now offers 22,000 titles for streaming, a growth of 70 percent this year -- it also notes, somewhat interestingly, that 96.4 percent of the Prime video catalog is viewed in any given week. As for the Kindle Owners' Lending Library, it now counts 180,000 titles, the most borrowed of which is The Hunger Games.