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Before quadrocopters become the four-winged horsemen of the robopocalypse, we're quite happy making 'em dance for our entertainment. A new artistic collaboration between the ETH Zurich university and Cirque du Soleil isn't your standard swarm show, though, imagining a more intimate relationship between man and machine. "Sparked" is the short film born out of this partnership, featuring the talents of several pre-programmed quadrocopters, one human performer and zero special effects. Rather than a technical demonstration, it's a story of a lonely lamp-maker and the (seemingly) inanimate creations that fill his workshop. We won't spoil any more of it for you, so head past the break for the full film, as well as an explanation from the creative and technical minds behind the project about how it came to pass.

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Bitcoins made real

PayPal has been coy about embracing virtual currencies so far, but it just took a big step toward welcoming them with open arms. As of today, the company's deals with processing firms BitPay, Coinbase and GoCoin let you pay with Bitcoin at North American online stores that both use PayPal's Payments Hub and accept digital cash. This doesn't mean your PayPal wallet can suddenly hold Bitcoin; the service says it's only moving "gradually" toward full support, and wants to see how things shake out. However, it should now be easier for many outlets (primarily smaller ones) to accept Bitcoin. Don't be shocked if some of your favorite internet shops flick the switch and give you an alternative to paying with old-school money.

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Acer Chromebook 13 review: long battery life, but performance falls short

After years of getting little respect, Chromebooks are finally on the rise (at least in schools), which means every major PC maker is trying to get in on the action. That includes chip makers too, like NVIDIA. Though the company previously shied away from Chrome OS devices, it's now pledging to power a whole range of different Chromebooks with its Tegra K1 chip, each of them promising long battery life and more graphics muscle. The Acer Chromebook 13 is the first of the bunch, and while some of you might be Chromebook'd out, we were actually excited. Here was a $300 laptop boasting at least 11 hours of battery life, a 1080p display option and enough horsepower to clobber Intel at things like gaming and rich websites. As it turns out, it was all just a little too good to be true.

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Is the PC dead? Well, that depends on who you ask. Still, no one can deny that people's habits have changed drastically over the past few years, namely due to the rise of smartphones and tablets. Samsung, for example, has found huge success selling mobile devices worldwide, but it doesn't look like the company is having the same luck with laptops, at least not in Europe. PC Advisor first broke the news earlier that Samsung was planning to exit the laptop market (Chromebooks included) in The Old Continent, and the South Korean electronics giant has since corroborated this report. "We quickly adapt to market needs and demands," Samsung said in a statement. The Galaxy brand maker did say "this is specific to the region," adding that it isn't "necessarily reflective" of the state of its distribution strategy elsewhere. You can read Samsung's official comment in full after the break.

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Octopus robot in action

Soft robotics can go a long way toward recreating the graceful movements of fish and other animals, and it now looks like they're helpful for replicating some of the stranger creatures on our planet, too. A team of Greek researchers has developed an octopus robot that uses silicone tentacles and webbing to move as elegantly as the real thing -- it's convincing enough that small fish will follow along. It's also much faster than a previous attempts, which used stiff plastic to plow through the water. While the original robot moved along at four inches per second, its squishier successor moves along at a healthier seven inches. That's not nearly as quick as the real deal, which can reach 25MPH in bursts, but it's far more consistent with what you'd expect from a real critter this size.

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Just before Simpsons World arrives offering access to that entire series, FXNow has arrived on Apple TV set-top boxes. While Bart and Lisa make their way to the on-demand repository, the channel serves up FX series like Sons of Anarchy, The Americans, Justified, Archer and more. If you're not into those selections, movies and more from FX, FXX and FXM networks are available -- so long as you have a required cable subscription. As you may recall, FXNow is already streaming its content on Xbox One, iOS, Android, Windows 8, smart TVs and on the web.

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Just as it happened on Android last year, now the iOS version of Google Currents has also been turned into Google Play Newsstand. But the name change isn't the only thing different with the app on Apple's platform. The newly dubbed Google Play Newsstand brings refreshed looks and functionality as well, which make it possible for you to browse through articles in smoother fashion and easily subscribe to topics and publications you're most interested in. While it definitely took the search giant a long time to tweak the Google Currents moniker, at least the application is finally more in line with sibling services like Google Play Movies & TV, Google Play Books and Google Play Music.

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World of Warcraft cutscene

Have you been anticipating Titan, Blizzard's first online role-playing game since World of Warcraft? Unfortunately, you're going to have to pin your hopes on some other title. The studio tells Polygon that it has cancelled Titan despite pouring seven years of effort into the project, which was never officially announced. As Blizzard's Mike Morhaime explains, Blizzard just "didn't find the fun" during a reevaluation -- the game was extremely ambitious, but it "didn't come together" as a cohesive work that you'd want to play. The developers were also nervous about defining themselves as an online RPG company. They want to build "great games every time," even if that means switching genres.

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This year's Ryder Cup won't have Tiger Woods representing the US, although some people argue that this isn't necessarily a bad thing. Regardless, the tournament, which begins today, must go on. To make the experience better for golf enthusiasts, Samsung has teamed up with the PGA and Turner Sports to release a Ryder Cup app for its smart TVs, allowing viewers to switch between live video feeds (provided by NBC and the Golf Channel), see an up-to-the-minute leaderboard right on the screen and easily keep up with either Team USA or the European Team.

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The disappearance of flight MH370 taught the general public one thing: that flight tracking technology isn't as comprehensive as many might have thought. Current radar doesn't have global coverage, and if a transponder fails (as was the case with the Malaysia Airlines flight) there's little that can be done. Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) promises to improve things, but still won't cover the whole planet. Aireon (a subsidiary of Iridium Satellite) has an implementation of ADS-B that promises global reach (a leap from 10- to 100 percent coverage according to its claims). It uses 66 of Iridium's "Next" Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites which is what allows it to cover remote, or oceanic regions out of reach by current systems. "Aireon Alert" has been in development for some time, and is scheduled to launch in 2017. What's new, is that Aireon has announced it'll be providing the it's Alert data to emergency services and the aviation community free of charge. Soon after launch, approved search and rescue teams will then be able to get the location of any ADS-B enabled flight without needing extra avionics.

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