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teapower

I would of thought by now that the rate of updates would of slowed down. Do you think we won't see anymore Android 2.X updates?

Will Android 3 bring just one 3.5 update but nothing else?

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21 replies
Dpmt

Yeah they need to slow down.
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teapower

Definitely. Well the rate of updates. Not the development rate. Just pack all 2.1 and 2.2 (and maybe 2.3) into a 2.5 update.
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jonursenbach

Google has always been in the boat of "release early, release often".
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anomalyconcept

...and keep things in beta forever :P
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brett

I think the reason that they do releases instead of having everything done internally until a huge update is that Google wants opinions from 'the outside.' If you're like Apple, you basically dictate what you think people should like. With Google, it seems that they'd rather hear what people would like and then they do that.

I do think development will slow down but I think that it will continue to be quick at least through this year because they are trying to sort of solidify their base features and whatnot.
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teapower

I see what your saying about getting other's opinions but I prefer alot of incremental updates instead of waiting a whole year for a bunch of features but with Google's model of releasing to hardware OEMs and letting them put there skins on top of it, it doesn't make sense.

I think it was okay to do some rapid releases at the beginning but they need to slow down now, with updates, not development, they have a ways to go before they can slow down on that.
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anomalyconcept

The hardware OEMs can choose which version they want to use as a baseline. But yes, the downside of having so many releases is that often by the time the product actually makes it to market, it's already several versions behind (see all the android 1.6 devices out).
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beau

I've seen nothing from Google that says they have any intention of slowing down or that their speed is in any way a problem. They see Android like GMail, something they can make changes to at any time.

I think it is a problem though. I'm a bit reticent to take on a two year Android contract unless I know I can stay up to date through the life of the contract.
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peter

Most people who buy phones aren't paying attention to this stuff. They barely even know the difference between each smartphone OS, let alone that there are different versions they need to pay attention to.
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LANjackal

That's very sad but also very true. One of my buddies has a DROID like I do. I asked him if he got the 2.1 update and he had no clue what I was referring to. I didn't even bother to try making him any wiser. Lost cause.
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deinfinityx

Thank you, people like us the ones that care will probably root our phones or buy a new one shortly after, especially with with plans like Tmo's. Google has basically just said they are watching the modding community not because they don't want it but because they are the ones coming up with all the cool stuff that will get implemented.
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teapower

True, but won't they be mad if apps start to not work?
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deinfinityx

That's not Google's fault or the manufactures, its the developers. And with every release they are given ample time to upgrade their apps so that they work universally. If they don't they deserve to be pulled. Apple does the same thing.
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beau

It's a dual responsibility of Google and the developers to maintain compatibility. We're at about 40 different Android devices now and increasing rapidly. It's would be too much to ask for devs, especially indie devs, to test on all of those devices for compatibility.
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teapower

True, but iPhone devs are developing for one platform because all devices get updates at the same time. Android devs might have to develop for 1.5, 1.6, 2.0.1, 2.1, and 2.2!
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foxyNinja

It's really not that much more difficult. Besides figuring out a layout, developing on 1.6 is just like developing for 2.2 (unless a dev wants to use the new API's). I built my app using the 2.1 sdk and changed it to 1.6 before releasing, without changing any code, and it works. They've made backwards compatibility simple, at least in my experiences.
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teapower

Show's you how much I know about Android development, or any development! Is Android development hard? I've never developed on any platform but I'm interested in developing, probably HTML though (I know, I know, not real development (right?) )
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Siraris

If you want to develop in HTML, you should explore developing for the Pre. Development for Android is mostly Java based. And "hard" is a relative term. For someone experienced in coding? I don't think development for Android would be that difficult for them. If you don't even know HTML? Yea, it probably would be pretty difficult initially.
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foxyNinja

Well I don't have much experience really. I learned in a few days and put together a fairly nice app. I actually started on iPhone which took about a week to figure out. I mostly looked around online and played with stuff. I think it's a fun thing to get into, even just as a hobby.
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clindhartsen

One would hope Google would either enforce upgrading to the current versions, or at least limiting how many new versions come out. WinPho caused fragmentation of it's own kind, Google could end up doing the same if there's no level of control.
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Siraris

Google has stated on numerous occasions that they will release multiple updates per year.
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