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"DNA origami" is nothing new -- in fact, IBM once considered it as a way to make microchips. However, Scientists at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden have become ridiculously good at folding the building blocks of life, and built a bunny to prove it. The point was not to do a party trick, of cour...

July 23rd 2015 at 10:05am 0 Comments
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Over the past few decades, engineers have leveraged Moore's Law to the fullest, resulting in powerful ultrathin laptops and feature-rich miniature wearables. Back in 1981, a 23-pound Osborne 1 computer was considered portable, with 64KB of onboard memory. Today, smartphones weigh just a few ounces...

June 13th 2015 at 11:00am 0 Comments
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Have you ever wondered why a supposedly defect-free material ends up cracking? University of Pennsylvania researchers have an answer. They've studied supposedly flawless materials (in this case, palladium nanowires) to see how they break on a nanoscopic level. As it turns out, these failures usual...

June 8th 2015 at 2:45am 0 Comments
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Orb spider silk, already among the toughest and strongest materials found in nature, could soon get a super-strong nanoscale upgrade. A research team from the University of Trento, Italy recently sprayed 15 Orb-weaving spiders, members of the Pholcidae family, with carbon nanotube or graphene part...

May 5th 2015 at 9:12pm 0 Comments
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Living up to his billing as an inventor/visionary, Ray Kurzweil kicked off an engineering conference in Detroit this week by imagining what might power cars of the future. Sure, he mentioned the self-driving cars his employer Google is working on, but a more interesting response was to a question...

April 22nd 2015 at 9:11pm 0 Comments
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Doctors dream of injecting cells with large nanoscopic cargo to treat or study illnesses. The existing approach to this is extremely slow, however. At one cell per minute, it would take ages to get a meaningful payload. That won't be a problem if UCLA scientists have their way, though -- they've d...

April 12th 2015 at 2:35am 0 Comments
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The days of having to rely on pricey lab sensors (or carefully trained canines) to detect bad food and bombs may soon come to an end. Oregon State University researchers have developed a hybrid optical and nanotechnology sensor that's at once super-sensitive to gas, but won't weigh a ton or cost a...

April 5th 2015 at 4:01am 0 Comments
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If you're the type of man that enjoys dry feet and pants, you'd better think twice before emptying your bladder in Hamburg, Germany. Pee against a wall in the city's historic red light district and there's a good chance that your stream will come back to bite you thanks to a coat of nano-paint.

March 11th 2015 at 3:18am 0 Comments
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Step aside, graphene, "silicene" is the trendy new nano-material in town that could one day supercharge future tech. Scientists have created the world's first transistor out of the silicon-based material, and it's a mere one atom thick. Unlike its much-maligned graphene cousin -- which has yet liv...

February 5th 2015 at 12:32pm 0 Comments
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As Tom Brady and other athletes can attest, you really, really want to avoid tearing your knee's anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). It can't heal up, and the tendon graft used to reconstruct it will likely leave you with permanent pain. Victims may have a much easier time of things if Northwestern...

January 4th 2015 at 12:52am 0 Comments
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A team of MIT researchers have developed nanoparticle sensors that could eventually be used to monitor tumors or other diseases, as well as act as a tool to diagnose illnesses. These nanoparticles are made of polymer chains that can bind to the sensors a doctor needs. For instance, in the scientis...

November 19th 2014 at 5:03am 0 Comments
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Many will tell you that green tea is good for your health, but researchers at Singapore's A*STAR might just make it a literal life-saver. They've developed nanoscale drug delivery "missiles" that use a key ingredient from green tea, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), to kill cancer tumors more effec...

October 7th 2014 at 7:09am 0 Comments