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We've heard that the \"gold standard\" pen and paper test seems to work fairly well at detecting the earliest stage of Alzheimer's disease, but gurus from Georgia Tech and Emory University have teamed up to develop a much quicker method for accomplishing the same. The ten-minute DETECT test utilizes

6 years ago 0 Comments
January 19, 2008 at 8:34PM
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Yeah, we've got HMDs for the visually impaired, but seriously, who's for sporting one of those things just to catch an afternoon soap? Thankfully, Dr. Eli Peli (and colleagues) from Harvard Medical School is lookin' out for said sect, and has developed a method for \"enhancing the contrast of images

6 years ago 0 Comments
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The world is already well aware of just how potent (and useful) femtosecond lasers are, and a recent study conducted by a team of Arizona State University physicists explains how pulses could be used to dismantle viruses and bacteria without harming a single innocent cell. Rather than follow in the

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We could almost swear we've heard this same scenario played out in a 80s era sci-fi drama, but apparently, this ain't out of any movie script. By utilizing 14 orbiting satellites and enlisting the assistance of NASA's Applied Sciences Program, scientists are reportedly observing our planet's environ

7 years ago 0 Comments
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While dexterous robots have been helping surgeons in America for some time, Edmonton's Royal Alexandra Hospital is finally getting with the program. Beginning in September, a four-armed surgical robot will be used in procedures to treat prostate cancer, and should provide a much improved in-depth vi

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We've already heard that electricity could cause all sorts of fatal side effects, and it's all but conclusive that stray WiFi can warp your brain, but how come magnetic signals are helping people get their lives back together? If you haven't already guessed, here we have yet another alarmist story w

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Caring for those with Alzheimer's could be getting a whole lot less stressful, as VeriChip has reportedly doled out 25 VeriMed RFID implantable microchips at the Alzheimer's Community Care 2007 Alzheimer's Educational Conference. Of course, these aren't the first invasive chips that the company has

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We can't say we'd be first in line to get a dose of Schizophrenia or anything, but Janssen L.P.'s Virtual Hallucinations system shows promise of helping cops, paramedics, and social workers understand a bit more of what the afflicted go through. The technology consists of set of goggles and earphone

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Although we've seen gait monitors and even prosthetic feet that assist individuals in regaining a more natural stride, scientists at Technion Institute of Technology in Israel have resorted to a head-mounted display for its rendition. This virtual reality device combines \"auditory and visual feedbac

7 years ago 0 Comments
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As the saga continues, we've got yet another flip-flopped story rolling through in regard to the toxicity (or not) of cellphones to our environment. Just under a fortnight ago, a report based on an (admittedly lacking) research study claimed that Colony Collapse Disorder within bees was being encour

7 years ago 0 Comments
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As the saga continues, we've got yet another flip-flopped story rolling through in regard to the toxicity (or not) of cellphones to our environment. Just under a fortnight ago, a report based on an (admittedly lacking) research study claimed that Colony Collapse Disorder within bees was being encour

7 years ago 0 Comments
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MIT's brainiacs aren't exactly new to the world of partying, and now scientists at the MIT Media Lab have invented a way to \"reversibly silence brain cells using pulses of yellow light.\" The presumably rave-inspired pulsing design offers up the prospect of \"controlling the haywire neuron activity th

7 years ago 0 Comments
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There's already a bevy of devices out there designed to keep track and manage one's diabetes and glucose levels, but Eli Lilly's innocuous pen-like injector looks to make the process of taking insulin a bit less invasive. The Huma-Pen Memoir resembles your average ink pen and shouldn't look too out

7 years ago 0 Comments
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After a long, hard day spent fixing that ever-present paper jam in the office printer, it's nice to kick back in iJoy's ZipConnect while letting the iGoGo personal massager sooth away your aches and pains to the tune of your favorite Breakfast Club jam. But Ntech wants to add one more aspect to you

8 years ago 0 Comments
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We're sure Dan Aykroyd and the gang never envisioned their symbolic ghost-busting machine being converted into a lice-evicting device, but researchers at the University of Utah are doing just that. The \"chemical-free, hairdryer-like device\" -- dubbed the LouseBuster -- eradicates head lice infestat

8 years ago 0 Comments
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The last time we checked in on electronic nose technology, hospitals were using the still-boutique devices for very specialized institutional work such as monitoring nasty bacteria outbreaks. Recent breakthroughs by a company called Nanomix, however, could make E-Noses a standard tool in every patie

8 years ago 0 Comments