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Yesterday at Maker Faire Bay Area 2012 we visited the Electric Imp booth to chat with the startup's founders and get some hands-on time with the tiny wireless computer. What is the Electric Imp? It's a module containing an ARM Cortex M3 SoC with embedded WiFi that's built into an SD card form fact

2 years ago 0 Comments
May 21, 2012 at 12:20AM
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The litany of exciting Maker Faire products continues with MaKey MaKey, a device that turns anything capable of conducting electricity into a controller. Developed by MIT Media Lab students Jay Silver and Eric Rosenbaum, you simply run an alligator clip from the board to an object and hold a conne

2 years ago 0 Comments
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This is Make's John Edgar Park, manfully clutching his Arduino Grande. The oversized device isn't just for show though, it's a fully working unit for those projects where a standard sized PCB just won't do. He'll be taking excited modders though the process of building it at Maker Faire on Saturda

2 years ago 0 Comments
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There are few things out there that can send you into a shame spiral of career despair quite as quickly as watching a group of people with arguably one of the funnest jobs in the world. People like the MakerBot 3D design team, who were tasked with assembling an army of cuddly robots a \"petting zoo

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Sure, it's no $500 3D printer, but the folks at MakerBot always have plenty of fun stuff floating around their Brooklyn headquarters. Stuff like, you know, a Robot Petting Zoo. The company's prepping a slew of 3D printed 'bots for display at the upcoming Maker Faire in California. CNET's got shots

2 years ago 0 Comments
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This weekend's Maker Faire in New York City was lousy with 3D printers. Every tent in the outdoor area was packed to capacity with the things, their owners standing beside them, showing off the small trinkets they'd created with the devices. Judging from their presence, there seems little quest

3 years ago 0 Comments
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Sometimes it's the simplest questions that lead to the most important innovation -- other times it's more that they're just plain fun to answer. Take the one asked by Grand Rapids, MI-artist, Sam Blanchard: what would the Wachowski Brothers' bullet-time effect look like, were it shot on, say 20 P

3 years ago 0 Comments
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What does it take to pique your curiosity? Would a building-sized, needle-nosed 50's space ship do the trick? Perhaps the female form, constructed entirely out of obsolete typewriter parts? How about a machine designed specifically to find out how many licks it takes to get to the center of that bl

4 years ago 0 Comments
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Nintendo's Wiimote (and the Nunchuk, by extension) have certainly been wired up to control their fair share of oddities, but we honestly can't think of a more suitable use for a spare 'chuk than this right here. The so-called Beancat is nothing more than a motorized beanbag chair that takes directi

5 years ago 0 Comments
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BMOW (Big Mess O' Wires) is a DIY PC, complete with a hand wrapped 8-bit CPU. Built by a game developer named Steve Chamberlain, this bad boy operates at 2MHz and sports 512KB memory, two-color video output, and a 512 x 480 display. According to Wired, the processor is closest in design to the MOS

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Austinites and Texans near and far, we hope you're headed out to your local Maker Faire this weekend -- wish we could be there, too. Seriously, where else in the world are you going to see a skinned Sega Dream Pony? Do us a fave, put your pictures on up the Engadget Flickr group, would ya?

7 years ago 0 Comments