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Scientists from MIT have figured out how to hack living cells to store biological events around them. They modified E. Coli cells to generate so-called retrons -- a type of mutated single-strand DNA -- in response to stimuli like light or chemicals. Those lo-fi \"memories\" can then be read back to

1 month ago 0 Comments
November 14, 2014 at 3:14PM
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So far, HIV has eluded a cure because it installs its genome into human DNA so insidiously that it's impossible for our immune system to clear it out. While current treatments are effective, a lifetime of toxic drugs is required to prevent its recurrence. But researchers from Temple University may

5 months ago 0 Comments
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Cancer's not slowing its march to ruining as many lives as it possibly can, so it's always pleasing to hear of any new developments that act as hurdles. The latest in the world of disease-prevention comes from Harvard University, where researches have created a dime-sized carbon nanotube forest (re

3 years ago 0 Comments
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We all know that light can't exactly pass through solid objects -- unless of course, you're using a laser or something. Yes, X-rays allow us to look into suitcases at the airport and broken bones in our bodies, but there's a new kid on the block that claims to have done the impossible in a novel fa

3 years ago 0 Comments
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We're no strangers to the futuristic catch-all idea of 'self-healing' -- it's one of the basic tent poles of many conceptions of tomorrow. That said, researchers are currently hard at work at Arizona State on a material that -- you guessed it -- can detect when it is damaged and, of course, heal it

4 years ago 0 Comments
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Researchers have devised plenty of innovative ways of viewing living cells, but their options are a bit more limited when it comes to actually manipulating cells without, you know, destroying them. Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles have now come up with one promising new possi

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Inkjet printers have long been used to print out all sorts of unusual goods, and while we've heard of scientists utilizing said technology to print stem cells, engineers are now exploring ways \"to print 3D structures of cells.\" According to Paul Calvert, a materials scientist at the University of Ma

7 years ago 0 Comments
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According to reports, a team of scientists have developed a battery which uses \"betavoltaic\" cells to keep chugging along for up to 30 years without the need for a recharge. If you believe what they say (and that's a big \"if\"), the battery uses a non-nuclear form of radioactive material as the basi

7 years ago 0 Comments