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If you didn't think mannequins were creepy enough already, maybe this will change your mind. In an attempt to lure shoppers, Japanese department store Takashimiya installed an eerily lifelike interactive robot for its Valentine's window display. The retailer called on robotics guru Hiroshi Ishiguro

2 years ago 0 Comments
February 3, 2012 at 6:32AM
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Does the Uncanny Valley extend to re-creations of our four-legged friends? We'll find out soon enough if Yasunori Yamada and his University of Tokyo engineering team manage to get their PIGORASS quadruped bot beyond its first unsteady hops, and into a full-on gallop. Developed as a means of analy

3 years ago 0 Comments
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Most robotic hands are built with a series of individual motors in each joint, making them heavy, expensive and prone to gripping everything with the subtlety of a vice. Japan's ITK thinks it's solved those problems with Handroid -- designed with cords that mimic the muscles in our meat-paws. N

3 years ago 0 Comments
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After a brief hiatus, that giant Gundam statue we spotted a couple years ago has once again returned home to Tokyo -- though he clearly didn't make the voyage in one piece. Rather than reconstruct the 60-foot robot in its entirety, Bandai, the company behind the Gundam franchise, has decided to

3 years ago 0 Comments
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Japan's Ministry of Defense is pretty good at its hovering drones, but we're not entirely convinced that this one will be fit for purpose. The RC reconnaissance scout reminds us of a spherical Iain M. Banks Culture drone, which is neat, except that this one's more conspicuous, dies after just eig

3 years ago 0 Comments
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How does a self-driving car know where it's going? By using a map, of course -- preferably a self-generated one. In yet another video exemplifying breakneck golf-cart-like speeds, the ZMP RoboCar shows us that it doesn't need a driver to know where it's going. At least, not the second time it

3 years ago 0 Comments
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Joining the extended family of robots assisting with the relief effort in Japan, the Texas-based Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR) has sent its SARbot to Rikuzentakata. Like some of the other bots, this guy can shoot video as it swims under houses and other crippled structures, b

3 years ago 0 Comments
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We'd love to head on down to Fukushima with a DSLR and some iodide pills, but that's obviously not going to happen. Sending in a flying robot seems to be the next best thing, though, and that's exactly what Tokyo Electric Power (TEPCO) has done. T-Hawk, a US-made MAV (Micro Air Vehicle) commonly us

3 years ago 0 Comments
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A few weeks ago, it looked like robots would play a relatively small role in recovery efforts following the earthquake and subsequent nuclear crisis in Japan, but as concern grows over radiation leaks, robotics companies are positioning their mechanical offspring to do jobs deemed unsafe for humans

3 years ago 0 Comments