Post Thumbnail

Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology and more in print and on the web. Some weeks, you'll also find short reviews of books that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read. Why Astros' Sophisticated Database Would Be Worth Hacking by Johnette Howa...

12 days ago 0 Comments
June 20, 2015 at 8:30AM
Post Thumbnail

Forget LED light bulbs... in the future, your lighting may be made from carbon. Columbia University researchers have built a light bulb chip that superheats graphene to produce illumination. While that's the same basic concept that you see in an incandescent bulb, the graphene filament measures ju...

14 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

And just like that, LightSail's inaugural flight is over. The Planetary Society has determined that its experimental solar sailer likely entered Earth's atmosphere (and met a fiery end) near the South Atlantic Ocean at 1:23PM Eastern on Monday. Don't bemoan the fate of the Carl Sagan-inspired spac...

16 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Scientists can simulate organs on chips when testing medicine, but mimicking your natural rhythm is another matter -- it's hard to know if those drugs will behave properly under the stresses of your body. That won't be a problem when the University of Michigan's newly developed testing chip comes ...

16 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Typically, recreating a celebrity as an animated 3D character requires painstaking modeling based on motion capture and laser scans. In the future, though, all you'll need is a few limo-chasing photographers. University of Washington researchers have developed a system that creates digital face "p...

17 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

After seven months of not-so-voluntary deep sleep, the comet lander Philae has finally woken up in earnest. The European Space Agency got in contact with its explorer for 85 precious seconds late on June 13th, receiving 300-plus data packets that shed light on what happened following the machine's...

18 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Who would you trust to determine history's most creative art? A room full of seasoned critics? Rutgers University researchers think a machine can do the job. They've developed a computer vision algorithm that ranks the creativity of art based on how similar it is to earlier works in terms of every...

21 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

We've seen flexible displays for some time now, and engineers at Binghamton University developed an origami-inspired foldable battery. The folding part is great, but these batteries are also powered by bacteria and made from paper, providing an low-cost option for remote locales where resources ar...

21 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

As advanced as prosthetic feet and legs have become, they're frequently lousy with stairs. You usually have to reconfigure your limb to make the climb, even if it's just for a few seconds. That won't be an issue again if the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago's efforts pay off, however. Its resea...

23 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Humans might not fly over the dwarf planet Ceres any time soon, but that doesn't mean you have to wonder what it would be like to soar over this miniature world. NASA just released a simulated flyover that uses real mapping data to give a new perspective on Ceres. The vertical detail is "exaggerat...

24 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Have you ever wondered why a supposedly defect-free material ends up cracking? University of Pennsylvania researchers have an answer. They've studied supposedly flawless materials (in this case, palladium nanowires) to see how they break on a nanoscopic level. As it turns out, these failures usual...

24 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

The Planetary Society's LightSail spacecraft just dodged another bullet -- the ground crew has not only regained contact with the Carl Sagan-inspired ship, but managed to deploy its sails. It's still not clear just what rendered the vessel silent last week. However, the Society suspects that there...

24 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology and more in print and on the web. Some weeks, you'll also find short reviews of books that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read. The Agency by Adrian Chen The New York Times Magazine There's a super-s...

26 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Remember Baymax's pain scale in Big Hero 6? In the real world, machines might not even need to ask whether or not you're hurting -- they'll already know. UC San Diego researchers have developed a computer vision algorithm that can gauge your pain levels by looking at your facial expressions. If yo...

28 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

What's that strange circular shape, you ask? That, friends, is what particle physics looks like when it's getting back on track. After weeks of test runs following its return to service, the Large Hadron Collider has resumed smashing particles together for the sake of real, honest-to-goodness scie...

28 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Robotic underwater vehicles from the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Research Institute just helped discover one of the Earth's more elusive scientific treasures. Both an autonomous mapping craft and a remotely operated counterpart (which collected video and samples) traveled 12,500 feet to the bottom of ...

28 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

NASA is convinced that Jupiter's moon Europa is worth visiting, and for good reason: its icy surface could be hiding a giant ocean friendly to life. The agency is going to need the right equipment if it's going to verify its theories, however, which is why it just chose nine instruments that will ...

1 month ago 0 Comments