Fujifilm

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  • Fujifilm's X-T2 camera pairs a familiar design with 4K video

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    07.07.2016

    Based on recent conversations with Fujifilm camera users, I know many of them couldn't wait for the X-T1 successor to be announced. And well, that day is finally here. Today, Fujifilm introduced its new X-T2 mirrorless shooter, a major upgrade over the X-T1 from 2014. The X-T2 features a 24.3-megapixel (APS-C) X-Trans CMOS III sensor without a low-pass filter, which should help capture sharp, DSLR-like images. Additionally, there's an X-Processor Pro chip that, according to Fujifilm, uses improved algorithms to produce a more accurate autofocus system (325 single points, 91 zone).

  • The Fujifilm X-Pro2 is a fantastic camera, but it's not for me

    by 
    Aaron Souppouris
    Aaron Souppouris
    05.07.2016

    I've been looking forward to the X-Pro2, Fujifilm's flagship mirrorless camera, ever since switching over to the X Series 18 months ago. To understand why, you need to know a little about me. I've only really been taking cameras seriously for seven years. My first came in 2009, a slightly battered old Nikon D40. Three years, three Nikons (I upgraded twice) and three additional lenses (35mm, 40mm and 50mm fixed) later, I was tired of lugging around a giant camera, and even more tired of the small selection of good lenses available in my price range. I then tried out a mirrorless Sony camera, but Sony's lens selection at the time was pitiful if you weren't willing to spend big money.

  • Fujifilm X-Pro2: The upgraded premium camera finally arrives

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    01.14.2016

    As rumored, Fujifilm's beloved X-Pro1 is indeed getting a sequel. Meet its appropriately named X-Pro2, the top-of-the-line camera that Fuji fanatics have long been waiting on. Designed for professional photographers, the X-Pro2 packs a 24.3-megapixel X-trans CMOS III sensor and new X-Processor Pro imaging chip, up to 8 fps continuous shooting, an extended ISO of 51,200 and a weather-resistant aluminum body. It also features an Advanced Hybrid Multi Viewfinder, which lets users swiftly switch between electronic and optical modes -- we've seen a similar option on previous Fujifilm cameras, such as the X100T and X100S.

  • Fujifilm reveals the FinePix XP90, a durable point-and-shoot

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    01.14.2016

    Fujifilm couldn't let Olympus, which introduced the TG-870 at CES 2016, have all the fun in the multi-purpose camera space. As such, Fuji has introduced the FinePix XP90, its new rugged point-and-shoot with waterproof (50ft), shockproof (about 6ft), freezeproof (14 degrees Fahrenheit) and dustproof capabilities. Compared to the XP80, Fujifilm's XP90 hasn't changed much, featuring the same 16.4-megapixel, 1/2.3-inch CMOS sensor, 5x optical zoom and 28mm wide-angle lens.

  • Fujifilm's mid-tier camera line grows with its X-E2S and X70

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    01.14.2016

    Not into the FinePix XP90 that was just announced? Don't worry, Fujifilm has something else for you. The Japanese camera maker is also introducing the X-E2S and X70, a pair of compact shooters for people who want to start getting serious about photography. First off, there's the X-E2S, which sports a 16.3-megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS II sensor, alongside a newly developed 49-point autofocus system and a max ISO range of up to 51,200. In addition to that, you'll get 1080p video at 24, 25, 30, 50 and 60 fps, but you won't find any 4K support here.

  • Fujifilm's X-Pro1 camera is finally getting a sequel

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    12.28.2015

    Fujifilm's X-Pro1 was hot stuff for mirrorless camera fans when it arrived in 2012, but a lot has changed in 4 years -- you can get considerably more powerful gear for the original asking price. At last, though, it looks like the photography giant is ready to update its flagship. Fuji Rumors has scored pictures of an X-Pro2 that (at least on the outside) is a welcome refinement of the original formula. You'll still see the familiar, retro-influenced body, but it boasts clear changes to the viewfinder (possibly borrowing from the X100T) and control scheme -- notice the joystick in the shot below? It may also be more compact, although it's harder to tell in these early images.

  • Best gear for your next road trip

    by 
    Wirecutter
    Wirecutter
    09.01.2015

    This post was done in partnership with The Wirecutter, a buyer's guide to the best technology. Read the full article here. A road trip can be a memorable adventure, but all adventures require a little planning. At The Wirecutter, we spend dozens of hours on each of our reviews to find the best gear for every part of your life. This year we drove 1,500 miles through four states to bring you our essential recommendations for your next road trip. Here are eight of our favorites.

  • Fujifilm's X-T1 flagship camera gets an infrared edition

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    08.03.2015

    No, this isn't the next flagship camera you've been waiting on from Fujifilm -- but this doesn't mean some of you won't be interested in it. The company today announced the X-T1 IR, a new edition of its high-end shooter featuring infrared technology, which captures details that aren't normally visible to the human eye. On the outside, Fujifilm's new camera looks identical to the original X-T1, with the two main changes being internal. While the X-T1 IR also features a 16.3-megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS II unit, its sensor's Standard IR cut filter was removed and an anti-reflective coating has been applied to it. Other than that, the remaing specs are the same: there's an EXR Processor II, a max ISO range of 25,600 and a weather-resistant shell, to mention a few.

  • Fujifilm outs the X-T10, an $800 interchangeable lens camera

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    05.18.2015

    If you've been holding out for a cheaper model of Fujifilm's X-Series flagship, the X-T1, today is your lucky day. The company has just revealed the X-T10 interchangeable lens camera, featuring a 16.3-megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS II sensor (with built-in phase detection autofocus), an EXR Processor II and compatibility with Fujinon lenses -- that's great news for people who are already invested in the ecosystem. It will also pack the revamped AF system Fujifilm announced last week, which is said to be speedier and more accurate overall, particularly in low-light conditions and when trying to capture moving subjects. Most importantly, perhaps, Fujifilm is pricing its X-T10 at a reasonable $800 (body-only), or you can shell out an extra $100 for the XC16-50mm kit.

  • Fujifilm's X-T1 camera is getting a revamped autofocus system

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    05.11.2015

    A notable firmware update is coming to the X-T1 and X-T1 Graphite Silver Edition in June, Fujifilm has announced. With this new version, 4.0, both sleek cameras will welcome a vastly enhanced autofocus system and other under-the-hood upgrades -- all of which are expected to improve performance by a long shot. The new Zone and Wide Tracking modes, for one, are said to make it easier to capture moving subjects, while the AF's accuracy has been tuned to focus faster in low-light conditions and on low-contrast items.

  • Fuji's premium telephoto zoom packs some serious punch

    by 
    Philip Palermo
    Philip Palermo
    02.15.2015

    Fujifilm may still be a relatively niche player in the mirrorless camera field, but that's not stopping the company from putting out some serious lenses to go along with its well-regarded X-series cameras. With the $1,600 XF50-140mm zoom, Fuji's hoping to provide a professional-level, weather-sealed telephoto zoom that can compete with the legendary 70-200mm lenses from companies like Nikon and Canon. I spent a month with the lens to see how close the company came.

  • Fujifilm packs a ton of power in the X30 point-and-shoot

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    09.17.2014

    The highlight for Fujifilm at this year's Photokina is undoubtedly the X100T and its brilliant hybrid viewfinder, but the X30 point-and-shoot is also not to be missed. Internally, the $599 compact is nearly identical to its predecessor, the X20, with the same 12-megapixel, 2/3-inch CMOS sensor and f/2.0-2.8, 28-112mm lens, but it features a few improvements that might make an upgrade worthwhile for at least a few select Fuji fans. The most significant boost is a new 2.36M-dot electronic viewfinder, which provides a full 100-percent view, along with a new tilting 3-inch high-res LCD.

  • Fujifilm's hybrid viewfinder makes the X100T compact camera even better

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    09.16.2014

    Both Fujifilm's X-T1 mirrorless and X100 compact cameras were widely lauded, so how could the company improve them without messing up a good thing? We'll talk about the X-T1 Graphite Silver Edition shortly, but in the case of the new X100T, Fujifilm's answer was to address its lone Achilles' heel: the viewfinder. The basics of the camera, like the 16.3-megapixel X-Trans II APS-C sized sensor and fixed 23mm f/2.0 lens remain the same as last year's X100S. Though the lack of a zoom might dissuade some, that lens delivers high-quality images and worked well with the original optical viewfinder (OVF). Though purists love OVFs, they bring certain problems -- namely, parallax issues on close-up shots and problems checking focus. Fujifilm has now addressed those problems with something we've not seen on any other camera: a hybrid viewfinder.

  • Fujifilm's new retro cameras pack smarter viewfinders and more controls

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    09.10.2014

    Those hints of significant upgrades to Fujifilm's retro-styled X100 and X-T1 cameras? Yeah, they're real. The company has just unveiled the X100T and X-T1 Graphite Silver Edition, both refinements of familiar formulas. The X100T gets the biggest update of the bunch. It still has a 16.3-megapixel X-Trans II CMOS sensor and that signature, super-bright 23mm f/2 lens, but should give you much more control over your output. The centerpiece is an improved hybrid viewfinder that lets you focus as if you're using an old-school rangefinder, hopefully giving you a well-composed photo on the first try. New focus peaking, split-image and filter simulation modes should also give you a better sense of how a shot will turn out before you press the shutter.

  • Fujifilm's got a pair of retro cameras in the works for next week

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    09.08.2014

    Less than a week after the tech industry swallows up Berlin, the photography industry does the same thing to Cologne. Photokina kicks off in just under six days, and already Fujifilm's big surprise for the show has been ruined by those tricksy leakers over at Digital Camera Info. According to the report, Fuji's about to launch the X100T, a retro-styled shooter with a 16-megapixel APS-C censor, 3-inch LCD screen and built-in WiFi for smartphone shutter control. Boasting a 23mm f/2.0 lens and shooting up to 51,200 ISO, the X100T will arrive in a wide variety of colors: black, and black with a silver trim.

  • Fujifilm X30 has a futuristic viewfinder to go with its vintage looks

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    08.26.2014

    Fujifilm was one of the first companies to turn compact cameras from "dying category" into "retro-tinged lust object," and its latest model, the X30, is no exception. The redesigned magnesium body still looks sharp, but Fujifilm has added an OLED XGA (2.36 million dots) viewfinder with a blistering 0.005-second lag in place of the last model's optical version. It also has a bigger, higher-res 920K-dot tiltable screen, longer battery life and WiFi connectivity -- which finally brings features like remote smartphone snapping. Core features remain the same, namely the 2/3-inch, 12-megapixel X-Trans II sensor; EXR Processor II; and the 28-112mm-equivalent, f/2.0-2.8 zoom lens. It also has the last model's $600 price tag, which may give some enthusiasts pause -- especially since Sony's stunning, $800 RX100 III is only a short rung up the price ladder.

  • IRL: Trading in Fujifilm's X-E1 camera for the X-E2

    by 
    Philip Palermo
    Philip Palermo
    06.01.2014

    A quick look at my Engadget profile can confirm I've owned too many cameras over the years. For the most part, they've been unassuming tools that have helped me make a living. Fujifilm's recent X-Trans cameras, however, have been something more -– they've been conversation starters. From random passersby to billionaire CEOs, folks have often commented on the aesthetics and image quality of my previous X-100 and X-E1 models. Now that the X-E2 is here ($999 for the body), I expect that trend to continue.

  • Daily Roundup: House of Cards season 2, hands-on with Fujifilm's X-T1 and more!

    by 
    Andy Bowen
    Andy Bowen
    02.14.2014

    You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

  • Fujifilm's dial-filled X-T1 is a manual shooter's dream (hands-on)

    by 
    Zach Honig
    Zach Honig
    02.14.2014

    On paper, the most significant addition to Fujifilm's X-T1 is its weather-resistant housing. But you'll need one of three as-of-yet-unreleased weather-sealed lenses in order to take advantage -- the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 kit optic isn't up to snuff when it comes to keeping out water, sand and snow, so if you opt for the $1,700 bundle, you'll be out of luck. Instead, we're quite taken with the camera's comprehensive control layout, which includes dedicated dials for exposure compensation, shutter speed and ISO (!) mounted up top. Some lenses also include an integrated exposure dial, so you can set the full exposure manually without any need to dig through menus. There's also a 16.3-megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS II sensor and an EXR Processor II, along with a 3-inch, 1.04M-dot tilting LCD and a really nice 2.36M-dot OLED viewfinder for framing shots.

  • Camera and photography deals of the week: 2.7.14

    by 
    Billy Steele
    Billy Steele
    02.07.2014

    If you're still looking to make good on that New Year's resolution to kick your photography habit into high gear, we might have a few options that can help. From an entry-level Nikon DSLR to a Wacom peripheral to aid with edits, there are a few options for spicing up those snapshots. Head on past the break and peruse the full lot. Just window shopping? No worries. Join us and add the gadgets you're shopping for to your Want list; every time there's a price cut in the future, you'll get an email alert!